The rare Super Flower Blood Moon as seen in the Toronto night’s sky on May 26, 2021.

This cheered me that tonight we had a rare moon in the sky. I was taken aback by the possibilities this raised for me that again nature gives us beauty and with beauty comes the nature of art, or perhaps, just for bloggers, the strength of the written word

I just had to share this. I was sitting on my balcony and watched the moon rise over a building. It was partially visible at first. Then rose to expose itself. I shining beacon.

I found this live action video on you tube a few minutes later.



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MCMLXXIX #weneedhelpdownhere

It’s been since several weeks since I wrote a post, the last being my Valentine’s Day post. We had a nice time.

About tech, once it got increasingly clear that the new normal would all the more include a style of work that focuses on doing it from home, and I’d already been thinking about what normal meant for people who liked to work from home, or found an advantage in doing it, I decided that maybe I could put my hand in at that occasionally and work on my style accordingly.

Today is the first Song Lyric Sunday of the spring this year. Jim has drawn a reference to the Omega. His post is found at: Omega is the End of The Line – A Unique Title For Me (wordpress.com) and you may wish to visit him there.

You can look at the idea in this light: while the alpha male needs to overwhelm, and the beta male needs to get by, the omega male has either quit or surrendered.

Let’s look at it and see what we can do with it.

My Alpha Girlfriend

Omega is the lowest ranking species in the omegaverse/alphaverse universe. Unlike their alpha counterpart, omegas are generally kind, shy, sweet, smart, and hard-working.

Stereotypical alpha: Yeah, Adam is a total omega. He’s smart and sweet but he’s way too weak.

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Omega

The complete Song Lyric Sunday prompt for March 28 is this: Endless/Eternity/Everlasting/Forever/Infinity/Omega.

Powerful words, words like endless, as in an unending circle, and eternity, the very notion of forever, like spirits bound.

I thought of the song Endless Sea, by Iggy Pop (not the Freddie Dredd song).

Endless Sea is on the Iggy Pop album in 1979 called “New Values.” Pop had got known as Iggy in school when he filled in as drummer for blues band The Iguanas. At Ann Arbor, Michigan, the Summer of Love came to pass, and Iggy Pop then age twenty, brought up in a dusty trailer park, was anything than that.

Iggy Pop

The music of Iggy Pop’s not my cup of tea, but I like his song Endless Sea. Endless Sea could be, I think, at least on one level, a song about working a low-level job and being dissatisfied.

In the first verse, Iggy Pop sings about “the service of the bourgeoisie,” as though he were holding down a job and dealing with the public, like having to give up his weekends to make ends meet (he sings, “when you’re tight for the rent”). If you want to be a musician, in theory, you have to do something to make money until you get some recognition.

That said, is there something wrong about working at Nickels Arcade?

Nickels Arcade

The reality, “real life” as some put it, is sort of, I think Iggy sings, baffled and hopeless, horrible, but relatable for those in similar straits. In other words, it’s a burden. For the narrator of Endless Sea, the sea is endless because from where he is on the water, the narrator can’t see the shore any longer, and he is adrift, I would infer, in a “sea” of unwanted circumstances.

It’s a punk rock number, and weird, accordingly. The word punk is often pejorative, but the idea of hustler-made-good is frequently romanticized. “Punk” usually refers to a young man who does things his way, perhaps badly, or perhaps with difficult consequences afoot, a rebel.

I think it first became something that young men started to find between themselves a collective will, by collecting record albums by punk bands.

punk by Parker.:) May 28, 2007 https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=punk

  • Punk is not about hair colour, style, or music, although the music does take a large part in most punks’ lives.
  • Punk is about liking what you like, being yourself, saying what you think and F*CK ALL THE REST.
  • You don’t need a two-foot-high red mohawk to be a punk, although that is wicked cool.
  • You don’t need sleeves, a backpiece, or any tattoos at all to be punk.
  • You don’t need a Misfits, Casualties, Sex Pistols or any band like that jacket, to be punk.
  • You don’t need anything to be punk except for awareness, self-respect, respect for others and an open mind.
  • PUNK IS NOT DEAD.
  • I don’t care if you wear drainpipes or not, you’re a punk cos you’re not some dumb prat who’s a f*cking loser poser who needs to get his shit straight!

I was joking with my friend about the challenge of interpreting song lyrics. “It’s not that straightforward,” she said.

Mind what the band Silver Jews revealed in their song Tennessee: “Punk rock died when the first kid said/’Punk’s not dead, punk’s not dead’.” Mind I’m not trying to put it to rest here. Silver Jews were an American crew from New York City, framed in 1989 by David Berman alongside Pavement members Stephen Malkmus and Bob Nastanovich.

Years ago, when I was in junior high, I memorized a poem titled the sea and recited it for a local competition. “So quiet, so quiet, he scarcely snores,” I murmured on the empty stage, the James Reeves poem again given the shake of life.

The judge commended me.

As a kid, I’d played the taboo Dungeons & Dragons game, the fad of the nineteen seventies that’s enjoyed frequent resurgence from time to time, my mother cautiously giving me the green light

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/14/critical-role-helped-spark-a-dungeons-dragons-renaissance.html

When I was in junior high, the game Dungeons & Dragons, as it was understood at the time, created the Isle of Dread, an archipelago far from the continent. Despite the name of the game, the Isle of Dread featured little in the way of a dungeon, and little in the way of a dragon.

The Isle of Dread

There was a carnivorous dinosaur living on the island, and the “dungeon,” such as it were, on the Isle of Dread, was an evil habitat inside a volcano. I think it was to be implied that the villagers of the island both lived in fear of and revered the giant lizard. Personally taking the role of the Dungeon Master, I aimed for enough of a fledgling theatrical ability to be able to play the game, with friends, and the role-playing lent itself, I would say, to interest in poetry, apart from the combat, spellcasting and character experience.

Far from poetry, and games, the word punk, in music, dates from 1971, coined by US rock columnist Dave Marsh. Previously an editorial manager of Creem Magazine, Marsh had been a contributing proofreader at Rolling Stone, composing stories on Bruce Springsteen, Patti Smith, the Rolling Stones, and The Who.

Endless Sea closes out with the lyrics, “You better go home, buddy,” as though Iggy Pop is warning someone infringing. When I was in school, in grade ten, my English teacher Patti explained that the idea of being plunged underwater can be read as a symbolic rebirth. It’s conceivable that the same imagery is in this tune Iggy Pop wrote.


trainspotting

Around the time I was starting to think about symbolism in the movies, the PolyGram film Trainspotting famously depicted scenes from the lives of youths in Scotland, in the nineteen-nineties, even going so far as to include dialogue in which the main characters discuss real-world music, as, for example, talking about the lag in the career of musician Lou Reed. Both Reed and Iggy Pop are included in the soundtrack for Trainspotting. Here is an idea of dialogue from the film, between characters named Tommy and Spud.

Tommy: I told her, I’m sorry, but these things happen. Let’s put it behind us.

Spud: That’s fair enough.

Tommy: Yes, but then she finds out I’ve bought a ticket for Iggy Pop the same night.

Spud: Went ballistic?

Tommy: Big time. Absolutely f*cking radge. ‘It’s me or Iggy Pop, time to decide.’

Spud: So what’s it going to be?

Tommy: Well, I’ve paid for the ticket.

Here now is the song itself, as well as a transcription of the lyrics. I would like to thank Jim Adams for what he’s done with Song Lyric Sunday, and I hope that the blog hop continues to go well. As well, I wish readers a happy spring time, as I know these are difficult times for all.

Endless Sea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeRKAc8xv_o
Iggy Pop

Oh baby, what a place to be
In the service of the bourgeoisie
Where can my believers be
I want to jump into the endless sea

Oh, oh the endless sea
Oh, oh the endless sea
I want to jump into the endless sea
Let it wash all over me

Above us is a dirty sky
Full of youths and liquors
A little girl, a little guy
This air can’t get much thicker

Oh, oh the endless sea
Oh, oh the endless sea
Oh, oh the endless sea
Let it wash all over me

And when you’re tight for the rent
You think you’re gonna break
But you know it’s no damn good
Just one more phony on the take
You better go home, buddy

I really think,
You better go home, buddy
You better go home, buddy
The endless sea

MCMLXXXVIII #thiswasweirdbutcool

For Valentine’s Day, this weekend, Jim’s prompt is the following: Brain/Mind/Think

Inside Our Heads – A Unique Title For Me (wordpress.com)

I likewise surmise that somebody will think this, but the word mind is in both the title and the lyrics of the band the Pixies’ 1988 tune, Where is my Mind?, so both checkmark boxes have been scratched.

Valentine’s Day is a magnificent day. Likewise, Where is my Mind? is a wonderful rock song, that, for example, concludes an excellent feature film, and it is a spoiler to tell you which movie. Notwithstanding, about the topic of taking care of business, it doesn’t hurt us horribly to battle, on the off chance that we have a way before us, of both self-assurance, and trust.

An anti-hero doesn’t always get the girl.

In 1988, I think the Pixies were already a lovely band. Song Lyric Sunday’s been teaching me how to go more slowly about what you might call a topic of conversation.

I don’t know right away what the lyrics of Where is my Mind? are about. The phrase of the title is an apologetic expression which means: it’s unfortunate that I have not been paying attention. The word mind is in the title of the Pixies tune, and furthermore provides the ensemble.

urban dictionary

I agree that a couple of Pixies melodies examine the Caribbean, the extraordinary swimming there. The website urban dictionary, in its entry for Where is my Mind?, refers obliquely to the recording artist Rihanna, and to her native Barbados.

At the point when I was in my first year of school, one friend hailed from Barbados, and he was a pleasant man. Settling the riddle of turning into a grown-up appeared to be an easy decision. It would include music and entertainment and other beloved properties of our combined cultural experience, growing and unfolding.

I’m attempting to say that to get an opportunity to throw about something like nineteen-eighties period hardware and that sort of business, is fun. To tell the truth, our guy in the dorm liked Star Wars, for example. That’s not the film with Where is my Mind? at the end, by the way.

where is my mind?

Pixies

it’s what you say when your head callaspes and there’s nothing in it.

with your feet in the air
your head on the ground
try this trick
and spin it

by “marooned” October 31, 2004 https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=where%20is%20my%20mind%3F

Before that, my sibling Josh had been known to indicate a proud interest in music at school. You might think it was his CD I grabbed for myself, but I usually didn’t do anything as mean to my brother as stealing from his music collection. When he’d been moved out for years, I sometimes sneaked into his bedroom to find a CD to listen to, left behind by him, but only once in a blue moon did I do something facile like that.

The line-up of the Pixies includes singer Black Francis, which is a stage name, and also Kim Deal, playing the bass guitar. Joey Santiago plays lead guitar and David Lovering plays the drums.

Charles Thompson IV is an American vocalist, musician, and guitarist. Come 1988, Thompson (“Frank Black”) had a bunch of great songs to do. He met Kim Deal for the first time when she was looking to join a band, and she answered his newspaper ad.

She was only discovering her talent, and they got a bunch of songs together, and on their combined strengths as musicians, they struck a deal with 4AD. Their first release as a band is the EP Come on Pilgrim. You know, my Come on Pilgrim CD may be as yet kicking around here.

Where is my Mind?

I should clarify for you that I wasn’t listening to the Pixies as far back in time as 1988. It was well after the band split in 1993 that I got a little more interested in the music the Pixies had heretofore done together. The first Pixies EP is from the year 1987, followed by a 1988 LP, on which you will find Where is my Mind?.

Pixies

The cover art of the 1997 Pixies retrospective Death to the Pixies presents 1987 as the band’s first year. Wikipedia says Where is my Mind? is the seventh track on the Pixies’ 1988 introduction Surfer Rosa. The tune was composed by frontman Black Francis while he went to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, recalling scuba in the Caribbean.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Where_Is_My_Mind%3F

I only took a little interest in what my brother was playing on his stereo, but I saw he had Last Splash by the Breeders, since it was on the radio a lot. Nowadays the Breeders’ Kim Deal has long quit the Pixies, opting not to rejoin, when the band synched up again, in the year 2004.

Julie, a girl from Scarborough who I met during a return visit to my college town, when I was twenty-five years old or so, said that a ton of Christian individuals would simply debilitate exciting music. It is difficult for me to oppose getting keen on music. I would never prize an informed outlook over something more articulate, whether unlikely.

You could say there was something about the way in the days the social media network MySpace was hot handling music that kind of got to me. I had the understanding that a periodical like Rolling Stone would be useful, say, to find great music, but it was interesting to see things were swiftly changing in the 2000s, in many different areas of life.

Have a wonderful Valentine’s Day, readers.

By the way, the word “stop” in the first line of this Pixies song has from time to time got me thinking of why listeners wouldn’t consider stopping the album during play. I think it is a metaphor (though a weird metaphor). By the way, Black Francis sings the word mind nine or ten times during the song.

Where Is My Mind? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49FB9hhoO6c

Pixies

Ooh, stop
Ooh
Ooh
With your feet on the air and your head on the ground
Try this trick and spin it, yeah
Your head will collapse
But there’s nothing in it
And you’ll ask yourself
Where is my mind?
Where is my mind?
Where is my mind?
Way out in the water
See it swimming
I was swimming in the Caribbean
Animals were hiding behind the rock
Except the little fish
Bump into me, swear he’s
Tryin’ a talk to me, say wait wait
Where is my mind?
Where is my mind?
Where is my mind?
Way out in the water
See it swimming
With your feet on the air and your head on the ground
Try this trick and spin it, yeah
Your head will collapse
If there’s nothing in it
And you’ll ask yourself
Where is my mind?
Where is my mind?
Where is my mind?
Way out in the water
See it swimming
Ooh
With your feet on the air and your head on the ground
Try this trick and spin it, yeah
Ooh
Ooh
Ooh
Ooh
Ooh

Songwriter: Black Francis
Where Is My Mind? lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

MCMXC #feelbadafter

“No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness.”

  • – Aristotle

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher who, among other texts, wrote Poetics. Poetics looks to address various types of verse, design, and division, in its segment parts. He characterizes verse that tries to address or copy life, through character, feeling, or activity.

In college, the area where I held up under scrutiny was theatre, and I learned a maxim that a little foolishness is genius, but too much foolishness is madness.

For the thirty-first of January, blogger Jim Adam’s prompt is the words, “Even/Odd.” Either of these words, in a song title, or the lyrics of a song, is the clue. I think this is the sixth time I’ve joined in Jim’s Song Lyric Sundays, a blog hop to share music.

Divided Exactly By 2 – A Unique Title For Me (wordpress.com)

About poetry, the word “even” is in the lyrics of “You’re Still Beautiful,” a 1990 song by the Aussie new wave band, The Church. New wave envelops various styles from the 1970s and the 1980s. The lyrics of “You’re Still Beautiful” indicate to me a kind of despair between man and woman, who perhaps are struggling to reconcile, after spending time apart.

You’re Still Beautiful

The song was part of the 1990 LP Gold Afternoon Fix, and the third of three singles for the LP. It was their second album by the band for Arista Records, after several earlier albums, those ones on Parlophone, I think.

It was the start of the nineties, and the days of The Church as a big, big rock band were coming to an end. That said, Gold Afternoon Fix featured another anthem: the song Metropolis.

The Church

Yet The Church guitarist Peter Koppes didn’t think You’re Still Beautiful was a good song. I like Gold Afternoon Fix, but we’re talking about the word of Peter Koppes, who did a record album as recently as last year, as did Steve Kilbey.

Also, the other guitarist for The Church, Marty Willson-Piper, years later, in his blog, dismisses Gold Afternoon Fix. In 1990, the going drummer for The Church, Richard Ploog, left the band, after doing the percussion for only four of the songs of the recording sessions. A few years later, Nick Powles joined The Church as their drummer.

Willson-Piper asks in his blog:

How did we go along with this approach with all our knowledge and experience? How did this come about when we were always so uncompromising when it came to our music? What the hell happened?

I am not sure whether Ploog provided his talent as a drummer for You’re Still Beautiful, or whether the beat of the song is the drum machine. If I listen again more closely, perhaps I can hear the difference.

The Church was a band I began to appreciate when I saw them on TV, and I thought about their music. When one of my uncles introduced me to the net, not too long after, searching for interview material with the band and that kind of thing was what I immediately thought to do. I was pleased to think, as a high school kid, I could get music like the songs on Gold Afternoon Fix.

You’re Still Beautiful

I enjoyed their album Priest=Aura, and I liked Heyday, too, and other albums of theirs I had on compact discs I quite liked, such as Of Skins and Hearts. I listened to The Blurred Crusade quite a bit, too. I found it charming, contenting.

Starfish in 1988 was exemplary. The lead-in single is a classic hit, but all ten songs on Starfish are great. Steve Kilbey sings eight of them, I think, and Koppes one song and Willson-Piper one song.

Gold Afternoon Fix is similar, with the band’s singer Steve Kilbey singing most of the songs and the two aforementioned gentlemen singing a couple of the tunes.

Willson-Piper in his blog discusses how grunge in 1990 was the writing on the wall. Singer Steve Kilbey was soon to evidence personal problems, and although the next Church record Priest=Aura was perhaps more inspired than Gold Afternoon Fix, Kilbey had no easy time of it, given his taste for what you might call debauchery. The word “even” is employed in You’re Still Beautiful this way: “You’re still beautiful, baby, even when you fall down that way.”

I assume the lady in the song is an alcoholic, or some kind of otherwise out-of-control personage, as Willson-Piper explains, in 2011, in his blog. I like the reference to Dorian Gray in You’re Still Beautiful. Dorian Gray is a Gothic and philosophical character, invented by Oscar Wilde, in the nineteenth century.

I wrote a high school essay about The Portrait of Dorian Gray. The character Dorian Gray remains young while growing old.

The Church

Peter Marks for Smells Like Infinite Sadness wrote NOVEMBER 1, 2015 an article titled Albums Revisited: The Church’s ‘Gold Afternoon Fix’ At 25. “The guitars sparkled, the bass seduced, the drums throbbed and the words remained absolutely timeless; the faithful so often tend to forget this one as it is sandwiched between two juggernauts in their discography and I’ve never quite understood that.”

My younger brother had bought me The Blurred Crusade, and Priest=Aura, too, when I was realized I would become absorbed in listening to the their music. It was like having an interest in poetry without seeming effete, or at cross purposes, for what that’s worth. The Blurred Crusade, I believe, was a Top 10 album ,in Australia, in 1982.

In the months of the pandemic, I turned my attention to watching a venerable Steve Kilbey play his songs on guitar, on Instagram. Reminded me how I felt about them, I brought up Gold Afternoon Fix on WordPress for a Song Lyric Sunday, oddly-timed somehow, as it was about the time Kilbey withdrew from doing his weekly performances. Obviously, it would be decent the off chance he were to get back to Instagram.

What I gathered from Kilbey’s chitchat is that a considerable number of songs by The Church are drawn from genuine encounters, which I’d imagined already. It is the thing that gives the melodies a relatability. Kilbey’s current album has the name Eleven Women.

In college, I had a compact disc edition of Steve Kilbey’s 1988 album Earthed, which came with a small book of poetry Kilbey wrote that I had given a read. My school schedule for English writing incorporated a presentation into how the verse of a poem is perceived. Kilbey’s were similar to the sort of thing I had read in secondary school.

The explanation for the Steve Kilbey LP given the title Earthed is that the records tends to be combined with his record Unearthed, likewise a decent record. Like Gold Afternoon Fix, these two solo records are full of drum machine beats. Earthed has essentially no lyrics at all; Unearthed does.

In 2014 Steve Kilbey reunited with bandmate Richard Ploog, when the drummer, formerly of The Church, rejoined Kilbey, and with Mark Gable of The Choirboys, for a “one-off.”

Richard Ploog and Steve Kilbey

I can’t clarify my interest much beyond saying that it’s an unusual thing, and the music contents me when I need something akin to retro rock music to get feeling good.

Steve Kilbey is now in his sixties. I’ve read Kilbey’s blog “the timebeing” from time to time, over the years, and I have learned a lot about both the band The Church and about poetry in general. He last put up new writing in 2019 http://thetimebeing.com/

Kilbey continues to be active on Twitter, while The Church as a band has gone their separate ways. Here are the lyrics for You’re Still Beautiful.

You’re Still Beautiful

Your mirror finally broke
Your little bunch of followers turned you into a fool
The butt of all their vicious jokes, screaming
You’re still beautiful baby
Nobody can take that away
You’re still beautiful baby
Even when you fall down that way
You turned up backstage at the palace
We thought you was wearing a mask
I felt so fucking embarrassed
When you looked at your reflection and asked, you asked
Are you still beautiful baby
Nobody can take that away
You’re still beautiful baby
Baby don’t believe what you see
Once upon a time I would have killed for you
I’m sorry that you got in this mess
But you’re the walking picture of Dorian Gray
At least it’s artistic I guess

Read more: https://muzikum.eu/en/123-5355-385510/the-church/youre-still-beautiful-lyrics.html#ixzz6kZakpNda

MCMXCVII #badglowup

For Jim Adams’ blog bounce, for Sunday, January 10, 2021, Jim has requested MA, meaning a tune with a title that begins with either the letter M or with the letter A.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2021/01/09/mature-audience/

I thought of a song with an unusual title, that begins with A.

“And Then (The Hexx)” is a song by Pavement, a b-side on Pavement’s “Spit on a Stranger” single in May 1999, I read somewhere. It sort of provides a conclusion to the 1997 Pavement album Brighten the Corners. Quietly now, that’s the Pavement record where the entire quintet is performing–it’s sometimes known as “dream pop.”

A second version of the song “And Then (The Hexx)” is again the conclusion to the next, and last, Pavement album, Terror Twilight. Strictly speaking, to the best of my understanding, the song is “And Then (The Hexx)” for the Brighten the Corners b-side, and simply “The Hexx” for Terror Twilight.

Rock musician Steve Malkmus, who around the year 1990 put together ideas for what became a classic all-American rock record, Slanted & Enchanted, while the young man was in high school in Stockton, California. Nice work if you can get it.

“And Then (The Hexx)” is eerie, and it has happiness to it as well.

Malkmus has reinvented himself twice since Pavement folded. First he played as Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks, and more recently, since 2018, just Stephen Malkmus. I’ve seen video of Malkmus performing his songs by himself for the groove denied tour.

Terror Twilight producer Nigel Godrich was keeping active on Twitter in December 2020, when he tweeted on the thirteenth of December, 2020, that, despite what Godrich called “the dark” of December, Godrich preferred the advice,”get your SAD lamp out and party!” SAD indicates seasonal affective disorder, mild depression brought about by lack of sunlight, in a cold climate.

Just updated my @stationrotatio1 December Vibes…… dark and beautiful month… I’m looking forward to the new year and new times with salivation. Stare at a wall and enjoy…. or get your SAD lamp out and party! #stationrotation https://t.co/nslwbKGr5v https://t.co/gcbQXFs5el— nigel godrich ?? (@nigelgod) December 13, 2020

The feeling echoes what Steve Malkmus said for the 2002 documentary Slow Century. Godrich’s observation is certainly deliberate.

“Get your handkerchiefs out,” Malkmus says, “and party.”

Writing for a Chicago online mag highlighting music, motion pictures, and TV, consequence of sound’s DAN CAFFREY says, “‘Spit on a Stranger’ looks back on a relationship that’s gone kaput — maybe a relationship with a band.”

I have the impression that, of the five band members in the band in 1999, that other than Steve Malkmus, they wanted to hang it up.

When touring the Terror Twilight record, Malkmus often hung a pair of handcuffs on stage, from his mic stand, to illustrate how he felt making a living in a rock band.

Dissected: Pavement
BY DAN CAFFREY
ON AUGUST 11, 2015, 3:00PM

https://consequenceofsound.net/2015/08/dissected-pavement/full-post/

“Terror Twilight,” Caffrey writes, “has a reputation of being Pavement’s tamest album, and that’s true, musically speaking — the tempos are sturdier and there’s much less yowling, despite a ripping harmonica solo (?!) from Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood.” Wikipedia says Jonny Greenwood, from Radiohead, played harmonica both for “Platform Blues,” and for “Billie,” both of which are Terror Twilight songs, Billie penned about Billy Graham.

Whether the various elements of Terror Twilight, Caffrey says for consequence of sound, scare the shit out of you or not, the lyrics prove that, even when they had run out of momentum and had to be practically forced by Godrich to come up with new material (the band reportedly was more concerned with playing Scrabble than recording) — even when music didn’t sound quite like itself, Pavement was still Pavement.

I saw in a more recent interview, it is somewhat eluding me where I heard this (I think it was organized by Vanity Fair for Seattle radio not too long ago), when Malkmus was talking about getting ready to play shows with Pavement, Malkmus said that to this day he enjoys the game of Scrabble.

I presume that’s Pavement fandom knowledge. Malkmus has said publicly he got really quite good. In a round of Scrabble, you make words on the game board utilizing letters, which add to the score.

Anyway, some fans consider “And Then (The Hexx)” to be a Brighten the Corners song, because of the 2009 rerelease of Brighten the Corners with the second CD with “And Then (The Hexx).” It is also the conclusion to Terror Twilight, which when discussed is usually just called “The Hexx.”

I still like to think of “The Hexx” as “And Then (The Hexx),” and that’s why it fits into Jim’s MA prompt challenge. However, the true release date of “And Then (The Hexx)” should be 1997, not 1999.

Pavement
And Then (the Hexx)
Composed by
Stephen Malkmus

Release Year
1997

The Hexx

MCMLXXVI Rock and Roll Heart

It feels like spring is here, this day in May. It’s been a cultural revolution.

Microsoft teases a ‘next generation of Windows’ announcement ‘very soon’

https://www.theverge.com/2021/5/25/22453222/microsoft-windows-next-generation-announcement-sun-valley-build-2021-keynote

One evening, the other day, I’d got to feeling, oddly, like how I did when I was an unfulfilled young person, feeling regret at letting time go, without, you could say, stopping to smell the roses.

Two weeks ago, the YouTube channel for IGN posted the Indiana Jones trailer commemorating forty years since Raiders of the Lost Ark made its premiere in 1981.

#IndianaJones
Darth Vader and the Death Star

It was kind of weird to think about a related film, The Rise of Skywalker, being in theatres an entire year in the past. Things have certainly changed.

Song Lyric Sunday is is a blog hop organized by Jim Adams. For Sunday, December 20, Jim’s prompts include: “circle.”

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/12/19/the-shape-im-in-2/

A blog hop is a social experience, a little fun if you blog.

About music, to be a famous musician is a powerful fantasy. I regard exciting music or any sort of expert musicianship.

The prompt circle reminded me of the late, great Lou Reed’s song Vicious Circle, on the album Rock and Roll Heart. In 1976, Reed’s first album with Arista Records followed the records he did for RCA after The Velvet Underground ended, and was kind of immediately enjoyable for a casual listener, though Reed seems to flirt again on Rock and Roll Heart with self-destruction, not unlike what a depressed but notable musician can be like. Rock and Roll Heart is the seventh solo studio album by Lou Reed, released in 1976. Heart is the seventh collection by Lou Reed. It was his first for Arista Records after record magnate Clive Davis safeguarded him. There’s a TV interview with Reed in Australia recorded around 1975, just before he made Rock and Roll Heart, where Reed seems unhappy.

Reed tries a joke about the tyrant Adolf Hitler, calling him a great organizer. The interviewer admonishes him. I think Reed was obliquely referring to Andy Warhol, who once managed him as a musician.

Reed is a championed rock guitarist and singer who is seldom rivalled, given the influence of his personality. He is gone, but when I was in college, one long-haired, heavyset history teacher taught us a little about him, calling Reed “the godfather of punk.” In the library, I found a little book about subculture, music subculture in the nineteen seventies, and I put energy into understanding it.

Lou Reed’s New York

Because of the acclaim of The Velvet Underground, that was after they ceased making music together, as a group, songs of theirs began to be popular.

When in the year 1999 I went into the HMV store in New York City, the international chain of CD shops where you went if you wanted music, in the days when you bought music on physical media, the Velvets were well-advertised, as in giant letters in the store announcing, “The Velvet Underground.” You knew it was their town.

Years before I was born, Lou Reed had a Top 20 hit, contributing to the new popularity of both Reed, and, consequently, the Velvets. The most popular song by Reed is a song I first heard on FM radio, cruising the streets of my town, probably for no particular reason, or for no good reason.

Lou Reed a Life by Anthony DeCurtis

I didn’t know who that singer was, on the radio, until I heard the song again, as though it were still 1972, in some kind of Doctor Who-type parallel universe. I still didn’t know whom it was singing like that, but eventually, a friend of a friend listened to me describe the song, and he knew who it was, given a moment (between thought and reflection).

I was in a circle, then, being a kid in high school, dealing with pressures that are specific to what I think is most kids’ experience. It wasn’t vicious, by the way, just sayin’.

The song Vicious Circle could be about having social pressures, like specific patterns ingrained in you to run up against a wall. The song is less up-tempo than most of the songs on Rock and Roll Heart. I am not sure the better part of Reed’s listeners would embrace music like his, if they didn’t feel, at least from time to time, that the intrigue about the music was coming from a place touched by despair.

There are stories about Lou Reed, when he was the frontman of the Velvets, like that he played Woodstock in ’69, but nobody could hear the sound. I don’t think the Velvets did play Woodstock. They broke up amid tension.

The third and fourth of the Velvets’ records were more straightforward as rock albums than the first and second albums. I believe in 1968 they performed in Hamilton, Ontario, but if so, that was likely the Velvet Underground’s only show in Canada.

Lou Reed’s hit in 1972 includes the B-side Vicious (not Vicious Circle). Four years after that, after Reed was back to being a struggling songwriter, Reed with Vicious Circle was possibly pointing to his choice of making a livelihood as a rock singer, because Vicious Circle points to the song Vicious, and the 45 format itself is circular in shape, music being on vinyl discs, records. There is a hint of weariness in Vicious Circle.

There is a Bowie song, too, with the word circle in its title, and I know there’s a reference to him in the title of Vicious Circle in all likelihood.

Reed had a great sense of humour, I read in college, the Velvets’ drummer Moe Tucker remarking on that about Lou Reed.

Reed expounded on experience in his music, including thoughts about sex and culture. Reed did much of his very best music with the Velvets, who were John Cale, Sterling Morrison, Moe Tucker, and Doug Yule.

Everything Lou Reed did music-wise is very acceptable, I think. The Velvet Underground is a legendary band. Many an amateur rocker knows whom the Velvet Underground are, and get songs like What Goes On, and Sweet Jane, west coast surf type stuff.

I used to wonder what Reed intended for the fate of his music.

I think with Rock and Roll Heart Reed was trying his hand at again being a straightforward rock musician. I would venture to guess that he was a pretty hot musician, trying to move into AM Radio with the record Coney Island Baby, but had simultaneously conveyed the ability to fail with his 1975 noise opus Metal Machine Music.

Metal Machine Music sort of seems easier to take as an experimental ambient noise album, but I take it fans of the artist would have wanted more rock songs, not something altogether weird like Metal Machine Music. Wikipedia says, “In 1979 Reed said ‘Saying ‘I’m a Coney Island baby’ at the end of that song is like saying I haven’t backed off an inch. And don’t you forget it.'”

Photo by Emanuele Bresciani from StockSnap

Reed lived a long life, until October 27, 2013, passing away at the age of 71. When I was In college, I didn’t believe Reed’s image as a street-weary rock musician, compared to who he was. I don’t have any acquaintance with it all, however.

Thanks to Jim Adams for the December 20 word prompt circle.

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Vicious Circle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfceMTlEq7s

You’re caught in a vicious circle
Surrounded by your so called friends
You’re caught in a vicious circle
And it looks like it will never end
‘Cause some people think that they like problems
And some people think that they don’t
And for everybody who says yes
There’s somebody who’s staring, saying don’t

You’re caught in a vicious circle
Surrounded by your so called friends
You’re caught in a vicious circle
And it looks like it will never end
‘Cause some people think that it’s nerves
And some people think that it’s not
And some people think that it’s things that you do
And others think that you were cold, when you were hot
They think that that is what it was about

You’re caught in a vicious circle …

Surrounded by all of your friends

MCMLXXVI #RiverdaleCherryBomb!

A cherry bomb is a circular firecracker, generally taking after a cherry, by size and shape. Cherry bombs range in size from seventy-five percent of an inch, to one and a half, in width.

Jason Bourne:
So…

Marie:
What?

Jason Bourne:
…we got a bump coming up.

The Bourne Identity (8/10) Movie CLIP – The Paris Chase (2002) HD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ETruidd5lQ

To a blogger like me, word prompts can be fun, and I noticed this year that Jim Adams, who has a comprehensive interest in music, which he brings to his blog, for Song Lyric Sunday.

For Sunday, December 13, one of the writing prompts is “cherry.” Jim’s blog hop gets people searching for a prompt word in a song title, or in the lyrics of a song. I’ve been interested in this the past couple of months.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/12/12/grapes-of-wrath/

He does a good job articulating what his favourite music means to him.

For cherry, The Runaways were an all-female American crew in the 1970s. Among their most popular tunes is Cherry Bomb. Never significant in the United States, the Runaways turned into a sensation abroad, particularly in Japan, because of Cherry Bomb.

The Runaways

On YouTube, when the channel for the CW’s hit Riverdale put up their trailer for Season 5, announcing that Riverdale would be on the twentieth of January, it looked incredible.

Riverdale is the story of the lives of Archie, Veronica, Jughead, and Betty. If you haven’t watched Riverdale, it is a beautiful adaptation of the beloved comic books about those character. It’s entertainment par excellence.

The prompt “cherry” reminded me of Riverdale because in Season 4, vain Cheryl Blossom, also the beautiful and capable captain of the Riverdale Bulldogs football cheerleaders, brings with her the aforementioned Runaways song. In Season 4, Episode 10 of Riverdale, the Bulldogs are playing their meanest rival, the Stonewall Stallions.

Riverdale: Season 4 | Official Final Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auTzpRm7lCACherry

It might be said that dance as elaborate as in the game pushes the audience’s expectations past the point at which the narrative stays relatable, but I’m sure, for most curious and fascinated viewers in the audience, the cheerleading number is pretty entertaining.

Perhaps it could have been Ginger Rogers, say, the cheerleading squad captain. In fact, it’s Cheryl Blossom, played by the lovely Riverdale actress Madelaine Petsch. You can see alongside her Veronica Cecilia Lodge, played by the actress Camila Mendes, the head of the band Veronica and the Pussycats and from the River Vixens.

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In Addition

These were the CW’s Top 5 Most-Watched Shows as of Nov 17, 2019, seventeen months ago.

  1. ‘The Flash’ When the CW chose to take on DC Comics properties, The Flash ended up being insightful.
  2. ‘Batwoman’ Its first year and its viewership made it number two.
  3. ‘Supernatural’
  4. ‘Arrow’
  5. ‘Riverdale’

On the CW, anything’s possible.

Season 4 of Riverdale ended without a complete conclusion, but it’s understood to viewers that Season 5 starts off, come January 20, with prom scenes that were shot to end Season 4. The Tomatometer at https://www.rottentomatoes.com/tv/riverdale/s04 gives Season 4 a rating of 7.56/10.

A shade frustrating that Archie and the team would have made it to their school prom in Season 4, the scenes weren’t finished in time to complete the season.

In my sleep, I had an unusual dream about this a few days ago. I saw in my dream a fantastic glimpse of Season 5. The actual trailer, which I later saw for myself, looks like it will be a great time all over again.

“No masterpiece was ever created by a lazy artist.” – Salvador Dalí

The expression Cherry Bomb is a play on the name of Cherie Currie, who was only 16. Currie was the lead vocalist in the mid-to-late 1970s.

Cherry Bomb is composed by Kim Fowley and guitarist Joan Jett. Cherry Bomb was positioned 52nd on VH1’s 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs. It topped at number 6 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100.

You’re welcome to like this post, to follow the blog, and to comment.

Cherry Bomb
The Runaways

Can’t stay at home, can’t stay at school
Old folks say, “You poor little fool”
Down the streets I’m the girl next door
I’m the fox you’ve been waiting for
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Stone age love and strange sounds too
Come on, baby, let me get to you
Bad nights causing teenage blues
Get down ladies, you’ve got nothin’ to lose
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hey, street boy, what some style?
Your dead end dreams don’t make you smile
I’ll give you something to live for
Have you and grab you until you’re sore
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry Bomb

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Joan Jett / Kim Fowley
Cherry Bomb lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

FOWC with Fandango — Voracious #GiveThanks

Fandango does daily midnight writing prompts, one-word prompts to inspire his readers to post around that word. I don’t think Fandango knows me, but I know him. I think Fandango and Jim are friendly but competitive.

Tonight’s word from Fandango is the word, “voracious.” https://fivedotoh.com/2020/12/04/fowc-with-fandango-voracious/

synonyms:
insatiable · unquenchable · unappeasable

I remembered also that a tweet of mine finally got some attention, a little. You can see from my screenshot (Twitter on a desktop), that when I took the snapshot, I had twenty-five likes from visitors, and fully five retweets, which is great.

FOUR TET, THOM YORKE AND BURIAL RELEASE NEW COLLABORATIVE 12” https://mixmag.net/read/four-tet-thom-yorke-burial-release-new-collaborative-ep-news

FOUR TET, THOM YORKE AND BURIAL

Those are the musicians. Thom Yorke is who did all those great songs with Radiohead, such as Just (You Do It to Yourself). Likewise, Burial has been called, by the cool people at Pitchfork, the best electronic music going.

The three recording artists haven’t done a release together since their second, in 2011. Out of those three names, I like Thom Yorke’s music the best, and I take it he is the most famous of the three.

Usually, most days, I’m screaming into the void. However, it couldn’t be more fun. I’m confident that I have a handle, while not being too serious about it.

I assist the family by participating in my dad’s business, and while I strategize myself on WordPress and Twitter, I trade a little business of his in with the mix. It is largely a case of volunteer stakes, not a large risk rather.

http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html

https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

https://www.quora.com/profile/Patrick-Coholan

I’m thankful that the news is saying there’s a 95%-effective vaccine against the worldwide pandemic. In Canada, I think one news report said three million Canadians will be vaccinated as soon as early next year.

For now, have a great weekend!

MCMLXIX #GiveThanks

It’s a time for words of thanks.

Ontario is on target to meet its objective of getting 65 percent of grown-ups before the month’s over, and there is good faith it very well outperform.

They expect that May 24, around 2,490 drug stores provincewide will offer Pfizer and Moderna. There ought to in the long run be around 280,000 traveling through the network every week, authorities said.

It is such welcome news.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/covid-19-ontario-may-12-2021-cases-icu-vaccines-1.6023305

Here on WordPress, occasionally I find specific bloggers to be interesting for me.  One guy like that is Jim Adams, who has a blog and who has planned blog prompts.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/11/28/domesticated-animals/

Jim has an interest in music and knowledge to share.

I recall the previous winter when my father brought up to me that the sharing I was doing online didn’t appear to be excessively important, as should have been obvious. I help out my father with his business.

https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited/

http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html

While I enjoy Facebook and Twitter, the day he offered that criticism about my content, I was a little miffed.  I know that my dad clowns, but I tried to look past that, to see if I could think of a better approach. I tried chancing to utilize the focus right now that Jim has been providing.

I’ve been blogging since MySpace, kind of a wow.  On WordPress, I have done some posting with a bit of humour to it, and in the months since my dad said that to me about how I seem on social, I eventually decided I still wasn’t too far off the mark.

There aren’t too many “rules” for running a social presence.

For November 29, 2020, Jim’s prompts include: “bird.”  The late Leonard Cohen made the song Bird on the Wire.

By the mid-1960s, Cohen started to form rock and pop melodies.  He had already written an expansive amount of writing, both poetry, and novels.

He studied at McGill in Montreal and made a name for himself through the sixties.  Cohen kind of burned out about that stuff in the early nineteen seventies, but music came to him his whole career.  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame enlisted Cohen in 2008, and Leonard Cohen got a Grammy Award in 2010.

Bird on the Wire is on the record Songs from a Room, released April 1969, and is like a poem set to the sound of Cohen’s guitar.   The title Songs from a Room is very simple, understating the mastery of the music.

Songs from a Room LP

Being able to enjoy something from the years before I was born is lucky, as hearing Bird on the Wire is an experience that has power to it, sentimental.  Strange song title, eh?  A listener feels like the hardships of life have been met by others just the same, whether more talented, or more fortunate.

Photo by Burst from StockSnap

Not to sound presumptuous, but Bird on the Wire is great that way.  Leonard Cohen got into music as a popular singer when he was losing interest in writing.  Wikipedia says that Bird on the Wire is a country song, a detail which surprises me, and reading that, I thought additionally that the song just has a simplicity that sets it apart from other country songs.

The country genre of music isn’t something I understand, and maybe neither is the language of love, but when I was in college, I got to study, one semester, Canadian music.  Country music in the Canadian Prairies is a favourite choice of many resident Canadians.

I can infer that Bird on the Wire could be a favourite of many who can remember 1969.  It was years before I was born.

There is something about cowboy music, that we’ve adopted in Canada, that reflects how life in the Prairies shaped up.  The first herders calling themselves “cowboys” got to the Canadian prairies in the 1870s, riding up from the US territories of Idaho and Montana.

The romantic image of the cowboy emerged around this American subculture.  British Columbia “buckaroos” likewise sooner or later adopted the cowboy appearance.

I doubt that Cohen identified with being a cowboy; he was a novelist, poet and musician.  He identifies, I think, with the archetype of a cowboy’s passion.  I think of the scene in the Hollywood movie City Slickers, where Billy Crystal’s Mitch Robbins character plays the harmonica at the campfire.

Curly, Jack Palance’s character, interrupts the music.

Mitch Robbins:  [Playing harmonica]

Curly:  Put that away.

Mitch Robbins:  [Stops, then resumes playing harmonica]

Curly:  I said, put that away!

Mitch Robbins:  Hey you know, the first time I tried to talk to you, you embarrassed me.  So I teased you a little bit which maybe I shouldn’t have done, so I’m sorry.

And now you’re sitting over there playing with your knife, trying to frighten me – which you’re doing a good job.  But if you’re gonna kill me, get on with it; if not, shut the hell up – I’m on vacation.

City
Slickers

Wikipedia explains that before writing Bird on the Wire, Cohen carefully structured the song, before committing it to tape.  To tell the truth, before I read Wikipedia’s description, I hadn’t thought that the song would be identified as a country song.

Cohen’s music is usually in the genres of folk, and soft rock.  Romantic country music doesn’t meld with the other interests in music I have thought of.  If Bird on the Wire is a country song, it breaks, I think, with the tradition of country music that country music fans enjoy.

It’s unique that way.  I wonder if a country song should be simple, but distinctive.  The answer isn’t straightforward.

Sometimes answers to questions like that turn up unexpectedly, even if it isn’t initially clear where to begin, to get an answer to the question.  A post like this one, doing the research and writing the content, helps me understand better something that already interests me, the music.  Also, maybe somebody else interested in this blog challenge thought to say something about this specific song.

I first heard Bird on the Wire when I was in high school, the twelfth grade or so, on a simply dubbed audio cassette.

Leonard Cohen passed on November 7, 2016 (aged 82).

I saw him once in concert.  It was terrific.

Here are the lyrics to the song, followed by the song itself, in a video.

Bird on the Wire

Like a bird on the wire

Like a drunk in a midnight choir

I have tried in my way to be free

Like a worm on a hook

Like a knight from some old-fashioned book

I have saved all my ribbons for thee

If I, if I have been unkind

I hope that you can just let it go by

If I, if I have been untrue

I hope you know it was never to you

For like a baby, stillborn

Like a beast with his horn

I have torn everyone who reached out for me

But I swear by this song

And by all that I have done wrong

I will make it all up to thee

I saw a beggar leaning on his wooden crutch

He said to me, “you must not ask for so much”

And a pretty woman leaning in her darkened door

She cried to me, “hey, why not ask for more?”

Oh, like a bird on the wire

Like a drunk in a midnight choir

I have tried in my way to be free

Source: LyricFind

Songwriter: Leonard Cohen

Bird on the Wire lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

https://youtu.be/BmPUu-rMpWA

MCMXC

This blog gets me crossing paths with individuals who have something to add about the world as they understand it.  Like the Discover feature on TikTok, imagination is an alluring quality.  

Jim Adams is a writer with a fascination for music, who concocts prompts for a blog.  He thinks of words for participants to find in song titles, or lyrics, in a blog format.

Participants discuss the songs with a common element, the writing prompt, as it appears in the lyrics, or in the song title.

Photo by Matt Jones from StockSnap

I have read some of his participants’ blog discussions and I have followed along some of what is new with Jim.  He publishes the prompts carefully, only a few at a time, to let his followers know what is coming.

For November 8, Jim prompted “days of the week,” and the song I thought of is Monday Morning, by the band The Church.  It has taken me a good deal longer than I anticipated to get this post ready and finished, but I thought the finished post might be good enough that I should go ahead and post it.

The Church is a rock band with a dark flavour for their music, rarely undemanding, weird at times, and atmospheric.  It’s not from my part of the world, but I like it.

The Church

The Church in the year 1990 wrote Monday Morning, singer Steve Kilbey, drummer Richard Ploog, guitarist Marty Wilson-Piper, and, guitarist Peter Koppes, for the record Gold Afternoon Fix.

At the time, The Church excused the completed collection as an innovative disappointment.   The percussion on the melodies didn’t turn out.

One of the songs for Gold Afternoon Fix is entitled Disappointment.  “Late for an appointment, clothes everywhere/I cannot find my memory anywhere/Ah disappointment just doesn’t care,” Kilbey sings.

I think Monday Morning is a song that initially appeared only on the CD release of the album, not the LP.  For me, The Church is a charming band, and I believe founding songwriter Steve Kilbey has since allowed that his original opinion about the album needn’t have been so critical.

The Church began in 1980 as a new wave band, a music genre emerging after the punk rock scene.  The Church was pretty noisy, good, though.  By 1983 they were making more experimental music.

By creative failure, I only mean music that lacks integrity, bad music.  That’s not The Church.  They are a band I quite like.

The chief problem with Gold Afternoon Fix is really that the personnel couldn’t come to an agreement about the percussion.  The melodies are very acceptable at any rate.  For example, I like the tune Monday Morning.

Perhaps the song is about a weekend fling, the freedom of time spent away, as from office life, when a free heart gets heavy again, when Monday morning arrives, and the weekend has dispersed.

The Church was in L.A. and the culture of the day must have touched on the lyrics Kilbey wrote for the record.  The air was full of energy.

As far as the discography by The Church, Gold Afternoon Fix followed their record Starfish, their 1988 album, which was a major achievement for them, and which contains the exemplary melody Under the Milky Way.  The record Priest = Aura followed two years after the fact, in 1992.  Steve Kilbey recalls fondly the 1990s in Sydney, Australia, he’s said on Twitter.

1988 The Church LP

Gold Afternoon Fix is an album I like.  The band did have trouble getting the percussion for Gold Afternoon Fix correct, and drummer Richard Ploog only plays drums on four of the songs on the album.  The other songs have the beat of a drum machine.

Other than Steve Kilbey writing occasional new material with a drum machine, the band had never considered using that kind of percussion on an album.  They’d become known for being a great beat.  Richard Ploog, the drummer, couldn’t finish recording the drums for Gold Afternoon Fix, however.

Mr. Ploog’s interest in music had stopped meeting the vision the other members of the band had, for the songs.  Ploog’s energy was turning into contention, with the interest in music the other three artists had.

Ironically, one of the first songs The Church did, in their early years as a band, is called Too Fast for You.  “Oh, and I hope I’m not going too fast for you/And don’t believe it when they say it’s over,” Kilbey sings.

Wikipedia says drummer Nick Ward played on their first collection; through the 1980s the band’s steady drummer, for a very long time, 1982-1990, was Richard, who left the band after Gold Afternoon Fix.  Mr. Ploog withdrew from The Church around 1990, to invest more energy with his better half.

In Marty Wilson-Piper’s blog, Wilson-Piper wrote in October 2011 that Monday Morning is one of the four songs that Mr. Ploog is playing on.  Marty Wilson-Piper is one of the founding members of the band, along with Kilbey and Koppes.  He calls attention to Peter Koppes’ mandolin, on the melody, and that is enough to appreciate the tune.

Mandolin

Monday Morning is one of the last songs Mr. Ploog played on while The Church was a big commercial act.  They continued to make records for years, but after 1990 they weren’t the same band, however good Priest = Aura turned out to be (a good album, too).

Artificial Photography

In my first year of school, 1996, I read a gathering about The Church.  There were some jokes about The Church’s concert film for Gold Afternoon Fix turning up in retail discount bins.  It was a joke about Gold Afternoon Fix not being their best album.

All things considered, fans’ excitement for The Church was unmistakable, and Richard Ploog got a ton of regard from audience members.  Gold Afternoon Fix also sold very well, commercially successful.  Ironically, the commercial rock was hard to combine with artistic integrity, Wilson-Piper’s comments reflect in his blog.

The difference between Gold Afternoon Fix and some of the earlier music by The Church, like Remote Luxury and Persia may be that the band’s vision for their music came across loud and clear on releases like the aforementioned, and was more subdued, so to speak, by 1990.  To tell the truth, I don’t know that the meaning of a song like Shadow Cabinet is clear to me; however, Shadow Cabinet was the name of one fan webpage.  Though years ago, I am sure it would have seemed to be quite a simple page compared to how it might have been today; pictures and blocks of text.

I sat in one of the rooms of the home of one of my uncles looking for The Church on AOL.  The Church was one of my very first Internet searches ever, and certainly the first band that I researched on the Internet.

The meaning of the lyrics for Monday Morning are clearer for me than words like “Queueing in the ruins in the wake of the gale it’s/Harmony I say” in Shadow Cabinet.

These days both Koppes and Wilson-Piper have moved on from The Church.  Koppes continues to write and record music; both Kilbey and Koppes had new albums in the autumn on 2020.

Fans of The Church are sometimes referred to as their Army.

Thank you to Jim for his prompt, “days of the week.”

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/11/07/a-week-is-a-unit-of-time/

As well, you’re welcome to like, follow and/or comment here.

https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

https://www.quora.com/profile/Patrick-Coholan

https://about.me/patrickcoholan

Monday Morning

Beyond the city, and evening dust

Dreams and thunder rattle the rust

You had an idea that you won’t have again

She’s forgotten your name and hopes you’ll do the same

Start of the ash, and the end of the flames

Burning you turning you

There was a lifetime spent in the sun

Hundreds of chances, blew every one

Dice rolled, double six, double six, double six

Owner of trouble, flesh blood and bricks

You had an idea that you won’t have again

She’s forgotten your name and hopes you’ll do the same

The start of the ash and the end of the flames

Turning you burning you

Oh Monday morning, the cracks become quite clear

Oh Monday morning, take me back, leave me hare

Beyond the city, and evening dust

Dreams and thunder rattle the rust

You had an idea that you won’t have again

She’s forgotten your name and hopes you’ll do the same

Start of the ash, and the end of the flames

Burning you turning you around

//genius.com/songs/1178162/embed.js

Monday Morning