Blog Challenge Argumentative

What seems free may have strings attached.

I wrote the first version of this post within the last year.  As part of a semi-weekly exercise in curating the blog posts I’ve written which I continue to think could have some potential (!), I have returned to this post with an interest in making it more accurate.

 This month in the United States the FCC will vote whether to repeal the legislation protecting net neutrality, and the Internet will likely become controlled in that nation by ISPs including Verizon, Comcast, and AT&T.  This means that some websites will function better (swifter) than others.  That isn’t good for the free speech of the Internet.

 What I wrote on St. Patrick’s Day of 2016 that remains true is this:  Some are in the dark about what could result from the lack of Internet controls generally enjoyed in the present.  I went on to say:  What seems free may have strings attached.

flag, united states, us, clouds, sky, freedom, democracy, flag pole, sovereignty, state, nation, country
Photographer: Christopher Burns

 

The literal price tag of any given service often includes only the bare essentials as they are understood. To thrive, a few dollars here and there (on apps, plug-ins, hardware, etc.) may be required, and the economic definition of scarcity surely applies here. For the desired recognition, I venture to guess that once more as in other similar situations money talks.

 This sounds like I am in favor of the repeal the FCC is likely doing, but I was actually only being facetious.  However, this does resemble in some fashion the reality what is going to happen in many Internet markets (most notably in the US).  To be competitive, without legislation to protect the free Internet, there are going to be requirements to “pay” (i.e., to spend for services) where presently it is a level playing field.

 

I mistakenly believed it was a right to privacy that would be contested, and while there has been such a battle, which is ongoing, but a clearer picture of how it is the Internet remains usable is not unlike what I wrote on that St. Patrick’s Day:  If you are subpar, you will be told as much as an army of folk waiting to raise their spears are as much the wolves at the door as Mom and Dad were in the old days. You need to excel or, plain and simple, you will be failing hard and failing fast.

 

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, but it is crucial that you learn from your mistakes as they happen to you. Own them and learn, and put them to rest with a dash more of hope for having conquered something, at least.  I always think that trying and failing is better than not to have tried an effort at all.

 Red and Green Alert Buttons

You need to bring to bear content, which is the substance of media as it’s understood on the Internet with an eye to generating traffic for your particular je ne sais quoi. You need to be real and you need to think smart, and the end result has to be a brand that is somehow recognizable on the Internet if you want to earn turf in cyberspace.

 I have put it in fancy language because I think it is a fancy thing, I wrote.  The need to argue for net neutrality is serious.  More than a few think the devil be damned and enjoy the occasional spotlight as it illuminates the crowd, I said.

 

You should accept that the decision to repeal the FCC legislation protecting net neutrality is a problem for those who count on their voices behind heard on the Internet and that the future will begin to be controlled by corporations, not individuals.  That is often the prize for the amateur designer, the potential and the possibility.

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