MCMLXXVI Rock and Roll Heart

Happy holidays! I am not very sure there is a great deal I could consider that hasn’t been investigated by different bloggers about how 2020 has been. It’s been a revolution.

Courts declared this week that Microsoft is defeated at the moment, in a lawsuit concerning the price of their systems and office software suites between the years 1998, and 2010. I don’t want to say the digital revolution was like 1995, or 1998, or 2010 or 2020 or any clearly-stated signpost like that. By revolution, I just mean it’s a lot easier now to be taking to the streets, with the Internet in place.

Photo by Kristin Hardwick from StockSnap

I trust your Christmas is a cheerful one this year. I experienced what has been like moments of rage this weekend (after I’d written the best part of this post).

I got to feeling torn up. I don’t know why.

One evening, the other day, I’d got to feeling, oddly, like how I did when I was an unfulfilled young person, feeling regret at letting time go, without, you could say, stopping to smell the roses.

Also this week, the YouTube channel for the Star Wars movies commemorated forty years since Episode IV The Empire Strikes Back made its premiere in 1980, although something tells me it was a springtime premiere. The next day the channel continued to remind people that Star Wars is a big tradition, VII The Force Awakens in 2015, VIII The Last Jedi in 2017, and, IX The Rise of Skywalker a year ago now.

Darth Vader and the Death Star

It was kind of weird to think about The Rise of Skywalker being in theatres an entire year in the past. Things have certainly changed.

Now, with Christmas right around the corner, Song Lyric Sunday is here, a great blog hop organized by Jim Adams, for like-minded bloggers. For Sunday, December 20, Jim’s prompts include a circle. https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/12/19/the-shape-im-in-2/

Song Lyric Sunday is itself a circle, what I think of as a blog hop. A blog hop is when bloggers post at the same time on the same subject, like when college kids do a pub crawl, where they go from bar to bar, to have drinks.

Jim has blogged this year a little about the impact of a blog hop (versus what I’d term an award crawl). His thoughts were couched in the language of how it is that an award crawl can be a little useless.

By award crawl, I mean when bloggers nominate each other to share an award, and to express appreciation. It’s a phrase I’m using to describe how that is.

A blog hop is effective because it isn’t just commending one another. A blog hop is a social experience, a little fun if you blog.

About music, to be a famous musician is a powerful fantasy. I regard exciting music or any sort of expert musicianship. On Wednesday this week, Rolling Stone published an article saying that music journalism on TikTok might be more and more important in the future. Rolling Stone pointed out that Generation Z kids in 2020 listen to music on Spotify and TikTok.

Jim’s prompt circle reminded me of the late, great Lou Reed’s song Vicious Circle, on the album Rock and Roll Heart. In 1976, Reed’s first album with Arista Records followed the records he did for RCA after The Velvet Underground ended, and was kind of immediately enjoyable for a casual listener, though Reed seems to flirt again on Rock and Roll Heart with self-destruction, not unlike what a depressed but notable musician can be like. A couple of times I’ve watched a TV interview with Reed in Australia recorded 1975, not all that long before Rock and Roll Heart, where Reed seems unhappy.

Reed tries a joke about the tyrant Adolf Hitler, calling him a great organizer. The question energetically admonishes him. I think Reed was obliquely referring to Andy Warhol, who managed him as a musician before Reed made an album.

A few people can’t avoid that zeitgeist, and for me, also, it’s enchanting. Reed is a championed rock guitarist and singer who is seldom rivalled, given the influence of his personality.

He is gone, but when I was in college, one long-haired, heavyset history teacher taught us a little about him, calling Reed, “the godfather of punk.” In the library, I found a little book about subculture, music subculture in the nineteen seventies, and I put energy into understanding it.

Lou Reed’s New York

Because, with the impact of Warhol, in the nineteen sixties, of the acclaim of The Velvet Underground, that was after they ceased making music together, as a group, but, regardless, songs of theirs began to be popular.

When I went into the HMV store in New York City, HMV the chain of CD shops where you went if you wanted music, in the days when you bought music on physical media, the Velvets were well-advertised, as in giant letters the store announcing, “The Velvet Underground.” You knew it was their town.

Related

HMV owner’s dramatic Christmas warning: ‘Let’s all use high streets – or Amazon will be the last shop left’

https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/markets/article-8972967/Use-high-streets-Christmas-urges-owner-HMV.html

Years before I was born, Lou Reed had a Top 20 hit, contributing to the new popularity of both Reed, and consequently the Velvets. The most popular song by Reed is a song I first heard on FM radio, cruising the streets of my town, probably for no particular reason, or for no good reason.

Lou Reed a Life by Anthony DeCurtis

I didn’t know who that singer was, on the radio, until I heard the song again, as though it were still 1972, in some kind of Doctor Who-type parallel universe. I still didn’t know whom it was singing like that, but eventually, a friend of a friend listened to me describe the song, and he knew who it was, given a moment (between thought and reflection).

I was in a circle, then, being a kid in high school, dealing with pressures that are specific to what I think is most kids’ experience. It wasn’t vicious, by the way, just sayin’.

The song Vicious Circle could be about having social pressures, like specific patterns ingrained in you to run up against a wall. The song is less uptempo than most of the songs on Rock and Roll Heart. I am not sure the better part of Reed’s listeners would embrace music like his, if they didn’t feel, at least from time to time, that the intrigue about the music was coming from a place touched by despair.

There are stories about Lou Reed, when he was the frontman of the Velvets, like that he played Woodstock in ’69, but nobody could hear the sound. I don’t think the Velvets did play Woodstock. They broke up amid tension.

The third and fourth of the Velvets’ records were more straightforward as rock albums than the first and second albums. I believe in 1968 they performed in Hamilton, Ontario, but that might have been the Velvet Underground’s only show in Canada. Even though you may not know I’m Canadian, I in any case get spellbound by performers who made it (or said they did).

Lou Reed’s hit in 1972 includes the B-side Vicious (not Vicious Circle). Four years after that, after Reed was through with RCA Records, Reed with Vicious Circle was possibly pointing to his choice of making a livelihood as a rock singer, because Vicious Circle points to the song Vicious, and the 45 itself is circular in shape, music being on vinyl discs, records. There is a hint of weariness in Vicious Circle.

There is a Bowie song, too, with the word circle in its title, and I know there’s a reference about him in the title of Vicious Circle, in all likelihood, but how can I know for sure?

Reed had a great sense of humour, I read in college, the Velvets’ drummer Moe Tucker remarking on that about Lou Reed.

Photo by Jens Mahnke from StockSnap

Reed expounded on experience transparently in his music, including thoughts about sex and culture. Reed did much of his very best music with the Velvets, who were John Cale, Sterling Morrison, Moe Tucker, and Doug Yule.

Everything Lou Reed did music-wise is very acceptable, I think. The Velvet Underground is a legendary band. Many an amateur rocker knows whom the Velvet Underground are, and get feeling good about songs like What Goes On, and Sweet Jane, west coast surf type stuff.

God knows I’m not a resident. I used to wonder what Reed intended for the fate of his music.

I think with Rock and Roll Heart Reed was trying his hand at again being a straightforward rock musician. I would venture to guess that he was a pretty hot musician, having just conquered AM Radio with Coney Island Baby, but had simultaneously conveyed the ability to fail with his 1975 noise opus Metal Machine Music.

Metal Machine Music sort of seems easier to take all these years later, as an experimental ambient noise album, but I take it fans of the artist would have wanted more rock songs, not something altogether weird like Metal Machine Music. Wikipedia says, “In 1979 Reed said ‘Saying ‘I’m a Coney Island baby’ at the end of that song is like saying I haven’t backed off an inch. And don’t you forget it.'”

Photo by Emanuele Bresciani from StockSnap

I have a theory that if Reed had clear success with Metal Machine Music, it would have meant a lot of change as far as music fans’ interest in what’s viable goes. Enough about that for now.

Reed lived a long life, until October 27, 2013, passing away at the age of 71. In college, I didn’t believe Reed’s image as a street-weary rock musician, compared to who he was. I don’t have any acquaintance with it all, however.

Thanks to Jim Adams for the December 20 word prompt circle. Have a great Christmas, Jim, and to everybody who sees this ahead of Christmas. You’re welcome to like my post, to comment and/or to follow my blog.

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Vicious Circle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfceMTlEq7s

You’re caught in a vicious circle
Surrounded by your so called friends
You’re caught in a vicious circle
And it looks like it will never end
‘Cause some people think that they like problems
And some people think that they don’t
And for everybody who says yes
There’s somebody who’s staring, saying don’t

You’re caught in a vicious circle
Surrounded by your so called friends
You’re caught in a vicious circle
And it looks like it will never end
‘Cause some people think that it’s nerves
And some people think that it’s not
And some people think that it’s things that you do
And others think that you were cold, when you were hot
They think that that is what it was about

You’re caught in a vicious circle …

Surrounded by all of your friends

MCMLXXVI #RiverdaleCherryBomb!

A cherry bomb is a circular firecracker, generally taking after a cherry, by size and shape. Cherry bombs range in size from seventy-five percent of an inch, to one and a half, in width.

Jason Bourne:
So…

Marie:
What?

Jason Bourne:
…we got a bump coming up.

The Bourne Identity (8/10) Movie CLIP – The Paris Chase (2002) HD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ETruidd5lQ

To a blogger like me, word prompts can be fun, and I noticed this year that Jim Adams, who has a comprehensive interest in music, which he brings to his blog, and invites peeps to get enjoying music given prompts that Jim himself thinks of, for his hop, what he calls Song Lyric Sunday.

For Sunday, December 13, one of the writing prompts is “cherry.” Jim’s blog hop gets people searching for a prompt word in a song title, or in the lyrics of a song. I’ve been interested in this the past couple of months.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/12/12/grapes-of-wrath/

This is a link to today’s Song Lyric Hop, moderated by Jim Adams. You may wish to have a look at Jim’s post for yourself. He does a good job articulating what his favourite music means to him.

For cherry, The Runaways were an all-female American crew in the 1970s. Among their most popular tunes is “Cherry Bomb.” Never significant in the United States, the Runaways turned into a sensation abroad, particularly in Japan, because of “Cherry Bomb.”

The Runaways

On YouTube, the channel for the CW hit Riverdale put up their trailer for Season 5 of Riverdale the other day, announcing that Riverdale will be returning on the twentieth of January. It looks incredible!

Riverdale is the story of the lives of Archie, Veronica, Jughead, and Betty. If you haven’t watched Riverdale, it is a beautiful adaptation of the beloved comic books about those characters. It’s entertainment par excellence.

The prompt “cherry” reminded me of Riverdale because in Season 4, vain Cheryl Blossom, also the beautiful and capable captain of the Riverdale Bulldogs football cheerleaders, brings with her the aforementioned Runaways song. In Season 4, Episode 10 of Riverdale, the Bulldogs are playing their meanest rival, the Stonewall Stallions.

Riverdale: Season 4 | Official Final Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auTzpRm7lCACherry

It might be said that dance as elaborate as in the game pushes the audience’s expectations past the point at which the narrative stays relatable, but I’m sure, for most curious and fascinated viewers in the audience, the cheerleading number is pretty entertaining.

Perhaps it could have been Ginger Rogers, say, the cheerleading squad captain. In fact, it’s Cheryl Blossom, played by the lovely Riverdale actress Madelaine Petsch. You can see alongside her Veronica Cecilia Lodge, played by the actress Camila Mendes, the head of the band Veronica and the Pussycats and from the River Vixens.

In Addition

These were the CW’s Top 5 Most-Watched Shows as of Nov 17, 2019, thirteen months ago.

  1. ‘The Flash’ When the CW chose to take on DC Comics properties, The Flash ended up being insightful.
  2. ‘Batwoman’ Its first year and its viewership made it number two.
  3. ‘Supernatural’
  4. ‘Arrow’
  5. ‘Riverdale’

On the CW, anything’s possible.

Season 4 of Riverdale ended without a conclusion, but it’s understood to viewers that Season 5 starts off, come January 20, with the prom scenes that were shot to end Season 4. The Tomatometer at https://www.rottentomatoes.com/tv/riverdale/s04 gives Season 4 a rating of 7.56/10.

A shade frustrating that Archie and the team would have made it to their school prom in Season 4, the scenes weren’t finished to complete the season.

In my sleep, I had an unusual dream about this a few days ago. I saw in my dream a fantastic glimpse of Season 5. The actual trailer, which I later saw for myself, looks like it will be a great time all over again.

“No masterpiece was ever created by a lazy artist.” – Salvador Dalí

The expression Cherry Bomb is a play on the name of Cherie Currie, who was only 16. Currie was the lead vocalist in the mid-to-late 1970s.

Cherry Bomb is composed by Kim Fowley and guitarist Joan Jett. Cherry Bomb was positioned 52nd on VH1’s 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs. It topped at number 6 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100.

You’re welcome to like this post, to follow the blog, and to comment. Thank you to Jim Adams for the prompt. I’ve appreciated having an opportunity to breathe new life into my blog.

Cherry Bomb
The Runaways

Can’t stay at home, can’t stay at school
Old folks say, “You poor little fool”
Down the streets I’m the girl next door
I’m the fox you’ve been waiting for
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Stone age love and strange sounds too
Come on, baby, let me get to you
Bad nights causing teenage blues
Get down ladies, you’ve got nothin’ to lose
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hey, street boy, what some style?
Your dead end dreams don’t make you smile
I’ll give you something to live for
Have you and grab you until you’re sore
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry Bomb

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Joan Jett / Kim Fowley
Cherry Bomb lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

FOWC with Fandango — Voracious #GiveThanks

Fandango does daily midnight writing prompts, one-word prompts to inspire his readers to post around that word. I don’t think Fandango knows me, but I know him. I think Fandango and Jim are friendly but competitive.

Tonight’s word from Fandango is the word, “voracious.” https://fivedotoh.com/2020/12/04/fowc-with-fandango-voracious/

synonyms:
insatiable · unquenchable · unappeasable

I remembered also that a tweet of mine finally got some attention, a little. You can see from my screenshot (Twitter on a desktop), that when I took the snapshot, I had twenty-five likes from visitors, and fully five retweets, which is great.

FOUR TET, THOM YORKE AND BURIAL RELEASE NEW COLLABORATIVE 12” https://mixmag.net/read/four-tet-thom-yorke-burial-release-new-collaborative-ep-news

FOUR TET, THOM YORKE AND BURIAL

Those are the musicians. Thom Yorke is who did all those great songs with Radiohead, such as Just (You Do It to Yourself). Likewise, Burial has been called, by the cool people at Pitchfork, the best electronic music going.

The three recording artists haven’t done a release together since their second, in 2011. Out of those three names, I like Thom Yorke’s music the best, and I take it he is the most famous of the three.

Usually, most days, I’m screaming into the void. However, it couldn’t be more fun. I’m confident that I have a handle, while not being too serious about it.

I assist the family by participating in my dad’s business, and while I strategize myself on WordPress and Twitter, I trade a little business of his in with the mix. It is largely a case of volunteer stakes, not a large risk rather.

http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html

https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

https://www.quora.com/profile/Patrick-Coholan

I’m thankful that the news is saying there’s a 95%-effective vaccine against the worldwide pandemic. In Canada, I think one news report said three million Canadians will be vaccinated as soon as early next year.

For now, have a great weekend!