MCMLXXXIX

I liked to read when I was a young kid.

In the early 2000s, the Internet, a frontier, the first blog I wrote was on MySpace. A girl I’d met in school said it was a brilliant site. It was a real long time ago.

These days, all these years later, I was looking at the post-https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/10/03/no-rules/ -when I got an idea. Jim suggested that fans teach specific insights into the songs they enjoyed.

For the eleventh of October, Jim suggested a few prompts, such as the word Hold, which reminded me of Hold On, on the Lou Reed album “New York,” a good album. The idea of the prompt is to identify a song with a specific word in the title, or the lyrics.

The late Lou Reed was a singer and guitarist whose album “The Velvet Underground & Nico” made a name for himself. Over twenty years later, the song Hold On, on the record New York, was more of Reed’s art-rock, ostensibly intellectually-minded rock music, if you consult a definition of art-rock. Art rock features elements of a classical style, as in, with Hold On, the stand-up bass instrumentation by Rob Wasserman, who played the bass parts throughout the album.

Last month, the label Rhino put out an interesting new edition of Reed’s New York. What was an hour of songs in 1989 that provided insight that only someone like Lou Reed could have, two decades earlier Reed had enjoyed the opportunity to be managed by pop artist Andy Warhol, in 1966, ’67, and ’68. Reed was an enigma of the music scene in NYC.

1989

Now Rhino has presented three entire records to expand upon the original album. They’ve presented the same songs as on the 1989 album, now also in live recordings of the songs, and also alternate versions characteristically called rough mixes. The new edition further includes a DVD edition of the concert film for the New York record.

The song Hold On speaks, it’s clear, to life in New York City. The lyrics seem to recall news stories about the city, as in, for example, the first verse of the song recalling the twentieth of December 1986. That’s when a racially charged beating by the police, of two African-Americans, in Howard Beach, contributed to tensions throughout the city.

I think Reed was guardedly optimistic that the problem of racism in NYC would change, as black people continued to be less compromised by race and social class.

I also think Reed could have been thinking of the impact Warhol made on the art world, with lyrics for Hold On like, “Something’s happening here.” I think beyond singing about the flavour of life in the city, and it’s a powerful song, there’s a theme how Warhol’s art had reverberated mightily, so the idea that something’s “happening,” a word tied to Reed’s shows with the Velvet Underground, and the dynamic of the art-rock he wrote while managed by Warhol must speak to that, I take it. A “happening” was the style of Velvet Underground shows under Warhol’s direction, including projections of Warhol’s films, strange light, and the loud noise of the band.

Photo by Dmitri Popov from StockSnap

There is evident power in Reed’s voice, in the song. The Tompkins Square Park revolt happened on August 6–7, 1988, the year before, in Tompkins Square Park, situated in the East Village and Alphabet City neighbourhoods of Manhattan. Gatherings of drug pushers, vagrants and also youngsters had assumed control.

The Big Apple

I think, without art, people don’t have the same legacy they have had, ever since cavemen drew pictures. I also think the creative components of social media draw in many artistic people. Look, here are the lyrics to Hold On.

You’re welcome to “like,” follow, or comment. Thanks to Jim Adams for the prompt “Hold.”

Hold On

There’s blacks with knives and whites with clubs
Fighting in Howard Beach
There’s no such thing as human rights
When you walk the N.Y.streets

A cop was shot in the head by a 10 years old kid
Named Buddah in Central Park last week
The fathers and daughters are lined up by the coffins
By the Statue of Bigotry, hey

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
Well, I meet you in Tompkins Square

The dopers sent a message to the cops last weekend
They shot him in the car where he sat
And Eleanor Bumpers and Michael Stewart
Must have appreciated that

There’s a rampaging rage rising up like a plague
Of bloody vials washing up on the beach
It’ll take more than the Angels or Iron Mike Tyson
To heal this bloody breach, hey, hey

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
I’m gonna meet you in Tompkins Square

A junkie ran down a lady a pregnant dancer
She’ll never dance but the baby was saved
He shot up some China White and nodded out at the wheel
And he doesn’t remember a thing
They shot that old lady ’cause they thought she was a witness to
A crime she didn’t even see
Whose home is the home of the brave
By the Statue of Bigotry, hey

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
Meet you in Tompkins Square

You got a black .38 and a gravity knife
You still have to ride the train
There’s the smelly essence of N.Y. down there
But you ain’t no Bernard Goetz, ah
There’s no Mafia lawyer to fight in your corner
For that 15 minutes of fame
The have and the have nots are bleeding in the tub
That’s New York’s future not mine, oh

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
You better, something’s happening here
Hold on, ooohhh, babe

Hold On

Prepositions of Place

Hi, I just read a fun post dated yesterday that got some people sharing music. It’s prompt words, Above/Below/Between in this case, that are utilized in a music challenge of finding music. The lyrics would contain the prompt words.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/08/22/prepositions-of-place/

The Beach House song Take Care doesn’t meet the criteria of utilizing one of the prompt words, but the lyrics to the song contain the words beside and inside, which are other words that are used to describe object placement. Maybe those two words could be future prompts.

The songwriters are Alex Scally and Victoria Legrand. Looks like it’s connected to the promising film Chemical Hearts.

https://blog.discogs.com/en/best-of-the-decade-beach-house/

I follow Fandango on WordPress and he commented in the last hour on the Prepositions of Place post that he would reblog Prepositions of Place. That’s how I caught onto the fun.

Beach House – Take Care (Chemical Hearts)

Stand beside it, we can’t hide the way it makes us glow
It’s no good unless it grows, feel this burning, love of mine
Deep inside the ever-spinning, tell me does it feel?
It’s no good unless it’s real, hillsides burning
Wild-eyed turning ’til we’re running from it

I’d take care of you if you ask me to
In a year or two, oh oh oh

You say swimming in the lake we’ll come across a snake
It is real and then it’s fake, feel its heartbeat
Feel what you heat, far so fast it feels too late

I’ll take care of you if you’d ask me to
In a year or two, oh oh oh

I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true

Bex’ Struggle Last October on EastEnders

On TV, the soap EastEnders has presented life in Albert Square in London since 1985, the story of the Beales and the Mitchells, and many other characters, all told.

It airs here in late-night TV slots on the weekend, many months behind its broadcast in England.  I find the value to be to appreciate how it is to live in a community other than the one in your life, with which you are familiar.

The lives of soap characters can be interesting.  There are confrontations and there are obstacles.  If nothing else, it’s a bit of fun.

Watching EastEnders in October 2019, not long before the thirty-fifth anniversary of the show, I can remember a little how it was watching the thirtieth anniversary, five years ago, when the soap revealed that the Beale girl, Ian’s daughter, had been murdered, a mystery.

What interested me in particular now, to the extent I am saying something about it here, is the going away party for Bex to celebrate her acceptance to Oxford.  Bex, before she relented, was a Goth girl, so to speak, ranking in the subculture of the disenchanted.  I think Bex had interests in the high school theatre where she went to school, and in playing the guitar.

https://heatworld.com/entertainment/tv-movies/eastenders-teenage-suicide-bex-fowler/

She is pretty while presenting emotionally adrift.  EastEnders characterizes Bex as an intellectual and artsy teen, moody and pointedly smarter than her peers, conflicted about her role in the life of Albert Square.

Bex has shown talent as a musician before giving it up.  She performs songs in a much earlier episode of the show, taking the stage in the Vic, when she is beginning to take on the role of a neighbourhood talent, a bright artistic girl struggling, given her ability to make waves.  What I’m moved to write about is the character’s decision, the night of her going away party, when her friends and family are celebrating her acceptance to Oxford, to pen a suicide note, and to overdose on pills, tears in her eyes, by herself in her bedroom.

Often EastEnders diverges from its responsibilities as a soap, presenting sometimes troubling storylines entertaining for soap audiences.

The suggestion that a brilliant, youthful, and gifted character, with circumstance thumping for herself, would settle on the extraordinary choice to end her own life, made me think.  Youth suicide is extremely sad, and it perplexes me that Bex would make that decision, bringing hurt on herself, and on everyone who knows and loves her.  The song that soundtracks the tragedy for Bex is the Tears for Fears song Mad World, music adding to a sense of despair and confusion that Bex is experiencing.

“The dreams in which I’m dying are the best I’ve ever had,” the song presents lyrically, as Bex drifts into near-death sleep.  Time-lapse photography shows the lights going out in the Vic, and the encompassing night sky giving way to a cloudy morning, when Bex may be lying there dead in her bedroom.  Her mom discovers her.

That’s the end of that episode.  Elsewhere in the TV landscape, that tapestry of storytelling that even in 2020 is compelling, the song Mad World has received another place of honour in a TV soundtrack, but in another show, in another nation, and for a different format.  Maybe strangely, but provocatively, Season 2 of the CW show Riverdale has likewise presented Mad World.

https://www.insider.com/riverdale-veronica-archie-varchie-relationship-timeline-2019-1#archie-goes-to-the-semi-formal-dance-with-betty-and-veronica-2

By Episode 8 of Season 2, the Riverdale character Jughead has risen in the ranks of the Serpents.  Musically-talented Archie and Veronica are presenting Mad World to their friends and family until the tension between them hits a breaking point, and they leave without finishing the song.

The group, a significant number of who are Serpents, are disappointed.  Betty thinks fast and takes the stage, picking up where Archie and Veronica stopped.  Betty quickly takes Mad World to a different level, assuming the role of dancer and drawing the Serpents in.

Jughead watches with shock, and maybe with interest. With his yearnings to use the Serpents, it isn’t unusual that Betty would in like manner expect another job.  Both EastEnders and Riverdale hit big audience numbers, and anyone who sees TV could note a similarity between the two Mad World scenes.

For Bex, it is about an early closure, and for Betty, it is tied in with seeing Jughead order the Serpents.  Bex’s mistake in EastEnders, which went down quite sometime after the Riverdale showstopper, reflects a character who feels alone, despairing so much that she decides to take her life.

Perhaps it could even be derived that she knows about Riverdale from TV.  EastEnders is set in reality.  The EastEnders characters watch real-world TV and hear real-world music in the Vic.

Bex, simply, doesn’t deserve death.  She is a beautiful, intelligent, talented young woman, for who opportunity is knocking.

https://stocksnap.io/author/kristinhardwick

I like both shows, both EastEnders and Riverdale, but there is a kind of question of how appropriate Bex’s act of self-destruction is.

The Mad World scene in Riverdale could, I see, be haunting, if it is relatable.  In EastEnders, the pendulum has swung away from the physical, to be a forebear of doom.  Both shows have a sense of appreciation for popular music when songs present loud and clear.

The haunting going on in these TV episodes has to be executed within the context of plot devices, or else it isn’t effective.  It needs to make ideas click for an audience, or it falls short of the substantial.  I think both shows want to present specific circumstances to get viewers feeling haunted.

“I find it kind of funny; I find it kind of sad…” Curious that the song lends itself to drama.  You’re welcome to comment and/or follow.  Thanks for visiting.

5 Reasons Doomers are Snarkier than Gawker

Doomers are real males in our culture?

No, they’re real, I’ve seen the evidence.

The BBC sitcom The I. T. Crowd, which was on TV in 2006 (!), included a Doomer character and that was fifteen years ago.

It took until 2018 for the Doomer to be “formally” represented with the character that appeared on 4chan.  Does nobody want to acknowledge that there was at least one recognizable Doomer in the media that far back?  Particularly when the comedy in question was hellbent on sending up the culture, as it was then understood?

I became interested when I noticed that present-day Doomer songs seemed to belong, characteristically, to the days of music in the nineties, and the 2000s.  I wondered why Doomers would choose music from quite a few years in the past as their signature musical expression.

Frowning Kei refers to Kaguya-sama: Love is War! character Kei Shirogane frowning.

Doomers

Say, if the Doomer character was age 23 in 2018, would that make him 25 in 2020?  Or, on the other hand, is it simply a diminishing statement that there stays a sizable subculture of youthful men?  They ain’t always nice boys, not that they’re stupid.  Okay, maybe it’s stupid.

1.    The interest in being a public drinker with few alternatives in mind hasn’t yet become removed from the beleaguered Doomer.  Drink in the evening, drink before bed, a little drink in the morning before work, drink on the transit.  To recognize this tell, see who the young man is relating to, signs that the young gentleman is subtly unsociable.

2.    Fixation on anything untoward that tends to have a home on the Internet–how the forces of the world conspire, how the culture’s music disrupts the tide on YouTube, how the character emerged on 4chan.  Why do they favour such a specific era of music?

3.    Taking a narrow view of the interest in them of women and otherwise being unable to relate, possibly because there could be something better around the corner.  Generally being jaded of most possibilities of romance.  Would he have a chance with Kei Shirogane?  Do you have a chance with Kei Shirogane?

4.    Insisting on nonchalance and cool in terms of the external image the Doomer projects.  I kind of like that.  There are many variations on the Doomer character from 4chan.  I gave myself such a variation for you, from know your meme.  The post received over 30,300 upvotes in /r/animemes in four days.  What do you know, it’s Kei Shirogane.

5.    Are you really reading Gawker?  I’m not sure my content aggregator finds material from the likes of those unapologetic whiners.  The Doomer culture is persistent and pervasive, whatever I said in my preamble.

Until the 4chan character, I just thought that was normal.  In moments of soaring self-esteem, I reflect that perhaps I was a Doomer, in the days when their music had the sense it was going music.  Perhaps not, though.

This week, again, K-Pop, on Twitter, challenged the #WhiteLivesMatter hashtag, effortlessly grabbing it back from the jerks who were intent on siding against BLM.  I am completely sympathetic to BLM.

I actually feel envious of K-Pop’s handle on Twitter.  I had thought the Twitter minions were often people my age, or maybe a little older than me.  I was mistaken.

Love is war.

I’d been content and happy to feel I was representative of Generation X.  That’s terrible talk, isn’t it?  On the weekend I encountered, via a YouTuber, a global kind of label I hadn’t heard of, which is Xennials, people born at the tail end of Generation X and just as Millenials were gaining prominence.

Mixer

I didn’t like that.  Specialists and media use birth from the late 1970s to the mid-1980s, as late as 1985, as their characterizing range.

I’d assumed I had it nailed as a true Gen X.  (I knew where my towel was.)

23 is a very young age.  Heaven help me, if a real Doomer actually reads this, by all means, indulge, but don’t overlook the possibility that you ultimately need some cashflow.  At the very least, get to the job you got every day you can.

If it suits you to be Anon, power to you.

This post was written with help from Portent’s Content Generator.  My stake in defining myself as Generation X means something to me, though.

Were you going to cosplay?

Frowning Kei Source:

Reddit

WordPress Discover: Instrument

For April 2020, the WordPress Discover prompts have returned, which are thoughts that have as their starting point a solitary word, the brief.  This week Krista Stevens is organizing them.

Krista’s prompt today is “instrument.”  When I think through what would be the challenges of learning to play an instrument, I think of the 2000s, and what the English pop band McFly did to celebrate breaking up. I think McFly did a few albums that were successful and, oddly I’d say, for young successful musicians, they finished with an album of self-parody, renaming themselves Son of Dork, what I think is a reference to the 1985 Robert Zemeckis motion picture Back to the Future, where Michael J. Fox and Crispin Glover both play characters with the name McFly.

SAMSUNG

One of the songs on the Son of Dork album is the ditty “Boy Band,” a woefully self-deprecating song that addresses the interest of a young man who day-dreams of being in a band.  That said, “Boy Band” does have a nice beat.

Anytime I feel like satirizing day-dreaming of being in a band, one listen “Boy Band” helps cool my heels.  I like the tune, as well.

Self-parody isn’t something I explore to get satisfaction with, it is just something neurotic that certain people play with.  Sometimes people who are both creative and successful resolve their neuroses with acts of self-parody, but I suspect too wide a foray into that avenue of thought is self-sabotage.

I try to keep an attitude to music that The Four Hour Work Week author Tim Ferriss describes.  Music is in, he writes.

When the Son of Dork CD was on my shelves, I’d arrived at the finish of the time in my life that I was finding myself and what my identity was, and I had unexpected interests in comparison to when I was more youthful and when I’d been bound to wander off in fantasy land, of playing an instrument.

WordPress Discover: Music

For April 2020, to get bloggers in the same spot, WordPress Discover has returned.  This week WordPress Discover is helmed by blogger Krista Stevens.

Today’s theme is “music.”  Krista asks about favourite albums.  My favourite album going is the Indie effort Groove Denied, by Stephen Malkmus, which came out on the Ides of March last year, 2019.

Sticker

It was exciting to learn about it.  It’s the second reinvention of himself Malkmus has presented, the first his solo career that followed his famed 1990s band Pavement, and now with what I’d estimate is a trilogy of albums so far, after five years between album releases.  What I mean is that Pavement did albums in the nineties, which were Malkmus along with several bandmates, and then there were several Stephen Malkmus solo records in the 2000s and 2010s, which ended with what to me was a fairly loud silence, a paradox.

After five years, Malkmus reinvented himself with kind of a second solo career.  The highlight for me was the album from 2019, Groove Denied.

If you don’t know about record albums, the groove is what the arm of the record player reads to play the music.  I take that the expression “Groove Denied” is a reference to streaming services that play digital recordings.  A record player is an analogue machine.

It is interesting for me that Malkmus’ vocal delivery, although perhaps a little dimmed by the passing of years, remains, to my ear, identical to how he sounded when he played with Pavement.

The songs Stephen Malkmus composes have always been brilliant, in my humble opinion, but Groove Denied seems outstanding.  There are three music videos for Groove Denied, handled in the United States by Matador Records, and it was a treat to watch them last year on YouTube.

Last year was the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Pavement record that went into the Top 5 of the year, Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain, in 1994.  The X shape on the cover of Groove Denied reminds me of the X Stephen Malkmus is wearing in the Pavement Slow Century DVD, when he comments on Pavement’s feud with the Smashing Pumpkins.

WordPress Discover: Orchestrate

social distancing

Today’s Discover challenge, by Michelle Weber, is about the word “orchestrate.” The last piece of music which moved me is the song battle born by The Killers.


The Killers

Up against the wall (Up against the wall) There’s something dying on the street When they knock you down (Up against the wall) You’re gonna get back on your feet Cause you can’t stop now (Cause you can’t stop now) Did they break your heart? (Did they break your heart?) And did they cause your soul to mourn Remember what I said Boy you was battle born

While The Killers are a great band, I didn’t initially have a strong positive reaction to this song of theirs.  Eventually, though, it began to move me the way a piece of music does, giving me the odd moment of pause while relevance in the song hits home with me.

What would it be that is “dying on the street?” I wonder briefly when I hear it.  There is a Pavement song from 1995, Grounded, that has a similar lyric. Both are interesting songs.

Everything Is Nice: The Matador Records 10th Anniversary Anthology

WordPress Discover: Pairs

The April 2020 WordPress Discover challenges continue with another essay by Michelle Weber, on the subject of “pairs.” Today’s Discover challenge for me is particularly enjoyable. I am thankful.

five best books you’ve ever read, and a song

Photographer:
Suzy Hazelwood

the stranger, by Albert Camus
killing an Arab the cure

a gentleman deals with the death of his mother. killing an Arab might have been the first single put out by the cure. i am sure the cure were inspired by the stranger when they wrote this song, which, despite its theme of “killing” is not a song about hate

brave new world, by Aldous Huxley
chrome injury the church

in the future, a man from lands outside civilization tries to come to terms with how people are living. chrome injury is a song from the church’ first record, a new wave record entitled of skins and hearts

bonfire of the vanities, by tom Wolfe
a well-respected man the kinks

an accidental hit and run are the minutes that serve to ruin a rich man’s life. a well-respected man tells the story of a man whose desires are controlled by his need to fit into “normal” society

one flew over the cuckoo’s nest, by Ken Kesey
ballad of Dwight Frye Alice cooper

a rogue goes into an insane asylum rather than face jail time. Alice cooper’s song ballad of Dwight Frye from their first album love it to death is on a similar theme, about a deadbeat dad who gets locked up

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance, by Robert Pirsig
born to be wild Steppenwolf

a man “throws away his wristwatch” and travels the united states. born to be wild by Steppenwolf is identifiable as being about that same kind of thing

by the way, you’re welcome to follow and/or to comment

WordPress Discover: Song

For April 2020, owing to the health crisis, Ben Huberman at WordPress has reopened the WordPress Discover challenges, to help out bloggers who like to blog about the same thing as other interested bloggers.  Today’s theme is “song,” and I thought of one particular piece of music that had me silly when I was a child.

Photographer:
Suzy Hazelwood

I have the good fortune that my parents are passingly interested in film, and it was actually cool that they showed me many films when I was a child.  In the nineteen-eighties, home video was a goliath, and movies went from the cinema to the home in a matter of no time.  Although I think my parents had more of a problem with me as the years went by, during my teen years, while I was a young adolescent, they kind of gave me the “PG” treatment by watching Hollywood fare with me, as they’d done for years.

I remember particularly the sort of inappropriate film fare of rock star Hollywood director Tim Burton that my parents seemed to understand, in their way, that was cool for film viewers.  The scene in Tim Burton’s 1988 comedy Beetlejuice, when Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis haunt the dinner party of the people who have moved into the house where the couple lived while they were alive, got me pretty silly, being only a little guy at the time.  I’ve found it on YouTube.

Thank you to WordPress, and Ben Huberman, for bringing back the Discover challenges.  If you enjoy film comedy, you may well have seen Beetlejuice, and I believe it’s the favourite film of my cousin Caryl.  She’s a few years younger than me, but as for pieces of music that affected me as a child, I would admit that did.

It’s Day-O by Harry Belafonte

BeetleJuice (Soundtrack) – The Banana Boat Song (Day-O) HD

A Difficult St. Patrick’s Day

It’s the end of March and two weeks ago was St. Patrick’s Day for 2020. The weather in Southern Ontario was reasonable in light of expectations. I found myself spending less time on Facebook. My sister telephoned me a couple of times.

A cousin of my mother, Cathie, along other lovely people, with a hobby of genealogy, ending with a nice account of the Irish my mother’s side of the family has. It looks like this St. Patrick’s Day, 2020, I’ll be a little less Irish.  It looks grim.

Photographer:
Tiago Almeida

change

the act or instance of making or becoming different.

I wish a lot of things were different, but I never would have chalked up the possibility of experiencing our pandemic catastrophe in my own life.  I read of environmental warnings, like that there could be, say, eight years until the damage to the planet caused by humans becomes irreversible, or that global warming will cause sea levels to rise, however active God is on the picture at large. I don’t know how human beings will fare.

To consider attacks between warring groups the world over, hellbent on decreasing each other to iotas, to very small pieces, I think also police and military unfairly treat peaceable citizens, because the police loathe the skin colour or addiction, behaviour that doesn’t toe the line for the safety of the public.  I think about these now and again, yet I hadn’t thought of what really descended three months ago. It is hard to contextualize that.

I always do my best to enjoy St. Patrick’s Day, as so many do with aplomb and style.  I welcome the end of winter. We are all called on to be, not so much Godfearing, as instead socially distant from one another.

Good on us all the same, that we can find solidarity in separating from one another, in a fashion that, like the lot of the unlucky addict, is no fault of our own.

Photographer:
Peter Hershey

We will have to come up with new measures to survive, and we have to do it at a time when I am sure many of us would be happier celebrating St. Patty’s in the usual fashion, wearing the colour green, and staying out late.  We’re told to stay out of bars and restaurants and nightclubs and still young people want to go to those kinds of haunts. I want to be young myself, but not to the extent I want to risk sacrificing growing old.

I wanted to think about a superb St. Patrick’s Day, and although I recall it every year, I don’t know I could say that any specific March festivity was better than some other.  A number of them were beautiful and left me feeling blessed. I am grateful to The Lord.

1998 occurs to me, becoming 21 years of age.  However, against how this spring is going, I don’t think the excitement of taking a visit back in time is going to especially cause me to feel better. I like to enjoy speaking a kind word at certain times, because a little kindness sprinkled in the mix, while not reversing the uncertainty that we’re facing, does help temper the darkness.

I would like to wish you a happy St. Patrick’s Day, dreadful or not.

St. Patrick’s Day isn’t to be overlooked, obviously.  Go with the luck of the Irish! Let’s have a safe spring!

You’re of course welcome to comment and to follow.  All the best to you, and to your loved ones.

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