MCMXCVII #badglowup

For Jim Adams’ blog bounce, for Sunday, January 10, 2021, Jim has requested MA, meaning a tune with a title that begins with either the letter M or the letter A. MA must refer to Master of Arts, one of which, I don’t mind admitting, I do not have. No, in fact by MA Jim means “Mature Audience”

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2021/01/09/mature-audience/

I thought of a song with an unusual title, that begins with A.

“And Then (The Hexx)” was done by Pavement songwriter Stephen Malkmus, as a b-side to “Spit on a Stranger” in May 1999, I read somewhere. It sort of provides a conclusion to the 1997 Pavement album, Brighten the Corners. Quietly now, that’s the Pavement record where the entire quintet is present and performing at once–it’s sometimes known as “dream pop.”

A second version of the song “And Then (The Hexx)” is again (!) the conclusion, as though an encore, after the band has heard their patrons’ cheers, to the next, and last, Pavement album, Terror Twilight. Strictly speaking, to the best of my understanding, the song is “And Then (The Hexx)” for the Brighten the Corners b-side, and simply “The Hexx” for Terror Twilight.

Pavement is chiefly the work of rock musician Steve Malkmus, who around the year 1990 put together ideas for what became a classic all-American rock record, Slanted & Enchanted, while the young man was in high school in Stockton, California. Nice work if you can get it.

“And Then (The Hexx)” came eight years after their debut on indie label Drag City, Steve Malkmus playing with bandmates Gary Young, Scott Kannberg, Steve West, Mark Ibold, and Bob Nastanovich. “And Then (The Hexx)” is eerie, and it has happiness to it as well.

Malkmus hasn’t ever stopped playing, having reinvented himself twice, since Pavement folded. First he played as Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks, and more recently, since 2018, if I am doing the gentleman justice, just Stephen Malkmus, solo as it comes. I’ve seen video of Malkmus performing his old songs by himself for the groove denied tour.

Terror Twilight producer Nigel Godrich was keeping active on Twitter in the month of December 2020, when he tweeted on the thirteenth of December, 2020, that,despite what Godrich called “the dark” of December, Godrich proferred the advice,”get your SAD lamp out and party!” SAD indicates seasonal affective disorder, mild depression brought about by a lack of sunlight, in a cold climate.

Just updated my @stationrotatio1 December Vibes…… dark and beautiful month… I’m looking forward to the new year and new times with salivation. Stare at a wall and enjoy…. or get your SAD lamp out and party! #stationrotation https://t.co/nslwbKGr5v https://t.co/gcbQXFs5el— nigel godrich ?? (@nigelgod) December 13, 2020

The feeling echoes what Steve Malkmus says in 2002 in the documentary Slow Century. Godrich’s observation is certainly deliberate. Indie humour.

“Get your handkerchiefs out,” Malkmus says, “and party.”

A Chicago-based online magazine highlighting music, motion pictures, and TV, consequence of sound’s DAN CAFFREY says, “‘Spit on a Stranger’ looks back on a relationship that’s gone kaput — maybe a relationship with a band.”

“Spit on a Stranger” was, I’d say, the first single for Terror Twilight. I have the impression that, of the five band members comprising the band in 1999, that other than Steve Malkmus, they wanted to hang it up.

Of them, perhaps only Malkmus didn’t feel like a loser. When touring the Terror Twilight record, Malkmus often hung a pair of handcuffs on stage, from his mic stand, to illustrate how he felt making a living in a rock band. Unfair.

Dissected: Pavement
BY DAN CAFFREY
ON AUGUST 11, 2015, 3:00PM

“Terror Twilight,” Caffrey writes, “has a reputation of being Pavement’s tamest album, and that’s true, musically speaking — the tempos are sturdier and there’s much less yowling, despite a ripping harmonica solo (?!) from Radiohead’s Johnny Greenwood.” Wikipedia says Jonny Greenwood, from Radiohead, played harmonica both for “Platform Blues,” and for “Billie,” both of which are Terror Twilight songs, the song Billie penned about Billy Graham.

Whether the various elements of Terror Twilight, Caffrey says for consequence of sound, scare the shit out of you or not, the lyrics prove that, even when they had run out of momentum and had to be practically forced by producer Nigel Godrich to come up with new material (the band reportedly was more concerned with playing Scrabble than recording) — even when music didn’t sound quite like itself, Pavement was still Pavement.

Not sure that’s true. What I read in the day was the opposite sentiment.

I saw in a more recent interview, it is somewhat eluding me where I heard this (I think it was organized by Vanity Fair for Seattle radio not too long ago), when Malkmus was talking about getting ready to play shows with Pavement, Malkmus said that to this day he likes the game of Scrabble, playing these days more frequently online instead of in a rock tour.

I presume that’s Pavement fandom knowledge. Malkmus has said publicly he got really quite good. In a round of Scrabble, you make words on the game board utilizing letters, which add to the score.

Anyway, some fans consider “And Then (The Hexx)” to be a Brighten the Corners song, because of the 2009 rerelease of Brighten the Corners with the second CD with “And Then (The Hexx).” It is also the conclusion to Terror Twilight, which when discussed is usually just called “The Hexx.”

I still like to think of “The Hexx” as “And Then (The Hexx),” and that’s why it fits into Jim’s MA prompt challenge. However, the true release date of “And Then (The Hexx)” should be 1997, not 1999.

I’ve decided not to show these verses. The video’s here, however.

Pavement
And Then (the Hexx)
Composed by
Stephen Malkmus

Release Year
1997

The Hexx

MCMLXXVI Rock and Roll Heart

Happy holidays! I am not very sure there is a great deal I could consider that hasn’t been investigated by different bloggers about how 2020 has been. It’s been a revolution.

Courts declared this week that Microsoft is defeated at the moment, in a lawsuit concerning the price of their systems and office software suites between the years 1998, and 2010. I don’t want to say the digital revolution was like 1995, or 1998, or 2010 or 2020 or any clearly-stated signpost like that. By revolution, I just mean it’s a lot easier now to be taking to the streets, with the Internet in place.

Photo by Kristin Hardwick from StockSnap

I trust your Christmas is a cheerful one this year. I experienced what has been like moments of rage this weekend (after I’d written the best part of this post).

I got to feeling torn up. I don’t know why.

One evening, the other day, I’d got to feeling, oddly, like how I did when I was an unfulfilled young person, feeling regret at letting time go, without, you could say, stopping to smell the roses.

Also this week, the YouTube channel for the Star Wars movies commemorated forty years since Episode IV The Empire Strikes Back made its premiere in 1980, although something tells me it was a springtime premiere. The next day the channel continued to remind people that Star Wars is a big tradition, VII The Force Awakens in 2015, VIII The Last Jedi in 2017, and, IX The Rise of Skywalker a year ago now.

Darth Vader and the Death Star

It was kind of weird to think about The Rise of Skywalker being in theatres an entire year in the past. Things have certainly changed.

Now, with Christmas right around the corner, Song Lyric Sunday is here, a great blog hop organized by Jim Adams, for like-minded bloggers. For Sunday, December 20, Jim’s prompts include a circle. https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/12/19/the-shape-im-in-2/

Song Lyric Sunday is itself a circle, what I think of as a blog hop. A blog hop is when bloggers post at the same time on the same subject, like when college kids do a pub crawl, where they go from bar to bar, to have drinks.

Jim has blogged this year a little about the impact of a blog hop (versus what I’d term an award crawl). His thoughts were couched in the language of how it is that an award crawl can be a little useless.

By award crawl, I mean when bloggers nominate each other to share an award, and to express appreciation. It’s a phrase I’m using to describe how that is.

A blog hop is effective because it isn’t just commending one another. A blog hop is a social experience, a little fun if you blog.

About music, to be a famous musician is a powerful fantasy. I regard exciting music or any sort of expert musicianship. On Wednesday this week, Rolling Stone published an article saying that music journalism on TikTok might be more and more important in the future. Rolling Stone pointed out that Generation Z kids in 2020 listen to music on Spotify and TikTok.

Jim’s prompt circle reminded me of the late, great Lou Reed’s song Vicious Circle, on the album Rock and Roll Heart. In 1976, Reed’s first album with Arista Records followed the records he did for RCA after The Velvet Underground ended, and was kind of immediately enjoyable for a casual listener, though Reed seems to flirt again on Rock and Roll Heart with self-destruction, not unlike what a depressed but notable musician can be like. A couple of times I’ve watched a TV interview with Reed in Australia recorded 1975, not all that long before Rock and Roll Heart, where Reed seems unhappy.

Reed tries a joke about the tyrant Adolf Hitler, calling him a great organizer. The question energetically admonishes him. I think Reed was obliquely referring to Andy Warhol, who managed him as a musician before Reed made an album.

A few people can’t avoid that zeitgeist, and for me, also, it’s enchanting. Reed is a championed rock guitarist and singer who is seldom rivalled, given the influence of his personality.

He is gone, but when I was in college, one long-haired, heavyset history teacher taught us a little about him, calling Reed, “the godfather of punk.” In the library, I found a little book about subculture, music subculture in the nineteen seventies, and I put energy into understanding it.

Lou Reed’s New York

Because, with the impact of Warhol, in the nineteen sixties, of the acclaim of The Velvet Underground, that was after they ceased making music together, as a group, but, regardless, songs of theirs began to be popular.

When I went into the HMV store in New York City, HMV the chain of CD shops where you went if you wanted music, in the days when you bought music on physical media, the Velvets were well-advertised, as in giant letters the store announcing, “The Velvet Underground.” You knew it was their town.

Related

HMV owner’s dramatic Christmas warning: ‘Let’s all use high streets – or Amazon will be the last shop left’

https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/markets/article-8972967/Use-high-streets-Christmas-urges-owner-HMV.html

Years before I was born, Lou Reed had a Top 20 hit, contributing to the new popularity of both Reed, and consequently the Velvets. The most popular song by Reed is a song I first heard on FM radio, cruising the streets of my town, probably for no particular reason, or for no good reason.

Lou Reed a Life by Anthony DeCurtis

I didn’t know who that singer was, on the radio, until I heard the song again, as though it were still 1972, in some kind of Doctor Who-type parallel universe. I still didn’t know whom it was singing like that, but eventually, a friend of a friend listened to me describe the song, and he knew who it was, given a moment (between thought and reflection).

I was in a circle, then, being a kid in high school, dealing with pressures that are specific to what I think is most kids’ experience. It wasn’t vicious, by the way, just sayin’.

The song Vicious Circle could be about having social pressures, like specific patterns ingrained in you to run up against a wall. The song is less uptempo than most of the songs on Rock and Roll Heart. I am not sure the better part of Reed’s listeners would embrace music like his, if they didn’t feel, at least from time to time, that the intrigue about the music was coming from a place touched by despair.

There are stories about Lou Reed, when he was the frontman of the Velvets, like that he played Woodstock in ’69, but nobody could hear the sound. I don’t think the Velvets did play Woodstock. They broke up amid tension.

The third and fourth of the Velvets’ records were more straightforward as rock albums than the first and second albums. I believe in 1968 they performed in Hamilton, Ontario, but that might have been the Velvet Underground’s only show in Canada. Even though you may not know I’m Canadian, I in any case get spellbound by performers who made it (or said they did).

Lou Reed’s hit in 1972 includes the B-side Vicious (not Vicious Circle). Four years after that, after Reed was through with RCA Records, Reed with Vicious Circle was possibly pointing to his choice of making a livelihood as a rock singer, because Vicious Circle points to the song Vicious, and the 45 itself is circular in shape, music being on vinyl discs, records. There is a hint of weariness in Vicious Circle.

There is a Bowie song, too, with the word circle in its title, and I know there’s a reference about him in the title of Vicious Circle, in all likelihood, but how can I know for sure?

Reed had a great sense of humour, I read in college, the Velvets’ drummer Moe Tucker remarking on that about Lou Reed.

Photo by Jens Mahnke from StockSnap

Reed expounded on experience transparently in his music, including thoughts about sex and culture. Reed did much of his very best music with the Velvets, who were John Cale, Sterling Morrison, Moe Tucker, and Doug Yule.

Everything Lou Reed did music-wise is very acceptable, I think. The Velvet Underground is a legendary band. Many an amateur rocker knows whom the Velvet Underground are, and get feeling good about songs like What Goes On, and Sweet Jane, west coast surf type stuff.

God knows I’m not a resident. I used to wonder what Reed intended for the fate of his music.

I think with Rock and Roll Heart Reed was trying his hand at again being a straightforward rock musician. I would venture to guess that he was a pretty hot musician, having just conquered AM Radio with Coney Island Baby, but had simultaneously conveyed the ability to fail with his 1975 noise opus Metal Machine Music.

Metal Machine Music sort of seems easier to take all these years later, as an experimental ambient noise album, but I take it fans of the artist would have wanted more rock songs, not something altogether weird like Metal Machine Music. Wikipedia says, “In 1979 Reed said ‘Saying ‘I’m a Coney Island baby’ at the end of that song is like saying I haven’t backed off an inch. And don’t you forget it.'”

Photo by Emanuele Bresciani from StockSnap

I have a theory that if Reed had clear success with Metal Machine Music, it would have meant a lot of change as far as music fans’ interest in what’s viable goes. Enough about that for now.

Reed lived a long life, until October 27, 2013, passing away at the age of 71. In college, I didn’t believe Reed’s image as a street-weary rock musician, compared to who he was. I don’t have any acquaintance with it all, however.

Thanks to Jim Adams for the December 20 word prompt circle. Have a great Christmas, Jim, and to everybody who sees this ahead of Christmas. You’re welcome to like my post, to comment and/or to follow my blog.

https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

https://about.me/patrickcoholan

Vicious Circle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfceMTlEq7s

You’re caught in a vicious circle
Surrounded by your so called friends
You’re caught in a vicious circle
And it looks like it will never end
‘Cause some people think that they like problems
And some people think that they don’t
And for everybody who says yes
There’s somebody who’s staring, saying don’t

You’re caught in a vicious circle
Surrounded by your so called friends
You’re caught in a vicious circle
And it looks like it will never end
‘Cause some people think that it’s nerves
And some people think that it’s not
And some people think that it’s things that you do
And others think that you were cold, when you were hot
They think that that is what it was about

You’re caught in a vicious circle …

Surrounded by all of your friends

MCMLXXVI #RiverdaleCherryBomb!

A cherry bomb is a circular firecracker, generally taking after a cherry, by size and shape. Cherry bombs range in size from seventy-five percent of an inch, to one and a half, in width.

Jason Bourne:
So…

Marie:
What?

Jason Bourne:
…we got a bump coming up.

The Bourne Identity (8/10) Movie CLIP – The Paris Chase (2002) HD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ETruidd5lQ

To a blogger like me, word prompts can be fun, and I noticed this year that Jim Adams, who has a comprehensive interest in music, which he brings to his blog, and invites peeps to get enjoying music given prompts that Jim himself thinks of, for his hop, what he calls Song Lyric Sunday.

For Sunday, December 13, one of the writing prompts is “cherry.” Jim’s blog hop gets people searching for a prompt word in a song title, or in the lyrics of a song. I’ve been interested in this the past couple of months.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/12/12/grapes-of-wrath/

This is a link to today’s Song Lyric Hop, moderated by Jim Adams. You may wish to have a look at Jim’s post for yourself. He does a good job articulating what his favourite music means to him.

For cherry, The Runaways were an all-female American crew in the 1970s. Among their most popular tunes is “Cherry Bomb.” Never significant in the United States, the Runaways turned into a sensation abroad, particularly in Japan, because of “Cherry Bomb.”

The Runaways

On YouTube, the channel for the CW hit Riverdale put up their trailer for Season 5 of Riverdale the other day, announcing that Riverdale will be returning on the twentieth of January. It looks incredible!

Riverdale is the story of the lives of Archie, Veronica, Jughead, and Betty. If you haven’t watched Riverdale, it is a beautiful adaptation of the beloved comic books about those characters. It’s entertainment par excellence.

The prompt “cherry” reminded me of Riverdale because in Season 4, vain Cheryl Blossom, also the beautiful and capable captain of the Riverdale Bulldogs football cheerleaders, brings with her the aforementioned Runaways song. In Season 4, Episode 10 of Riverdale, the Bulldogs are playing their meanest rival, the Stonewall Stallions.

Riverdale: Season 4 | Official Final Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auTzpRm7lCACherry

It might be said that dance as elaborate as in the game pushes the audience’s expectations past the point at which the narrative stays relatable, but I’m sure, for most curious and fascinated viewers in the audience, the cheerleading number is pretty entertaining.

Perhaps it could have been Ginger Rogers, say, the cheerleading squad captain. In fact, it’s Cheryl Blossom, played by the lovely Riverdale actress Madelaine Petsch. You can see alongside her Veronica Cecilia Lodge, played by the actress Camila Mendes, the head of the band Veronica and the Pussycats and from the River Vixens.

In Addition

These were the CW’s Top 5 Most-Watched Shows as of Nov 17, 2019, thirteen months ago.

  1. ‘The Flash’ When the CW chose to take on DC Comics properties, The Flash ended up being insightful.
  2. ‘Batwoman’ Its first year and its viewership made it number two.
  3. ‘Supernatural’
  4. ‘Arrow’
  5. ‘Riverdale’

On the CW, anything’s possible.

Season 4 of Riverdale ended without a conclusion, but it’s understood to viewers that Season 5 starts off, come January 20, with the prom scenes that were shot to end Season 4. The Tomatometer at https://www.rottentomatoes.com/tv/riverdale/s04 gives Season 4 a rating of 7.56/10.

A shade frustrating that Archie and the team would have made it to their school prom in Season 4, the scenes weren’t finished to complete the season.

In my sleep, I had an unusual dream about this a few days ago. I saw in my dream a fantastic glimpse of Season 5. The actual trailer, which I later saw for myself, looks like it will be a great time all over again.

“No masterpiece was ever created by a lazy artist.” – Salvador Dalí

The expression Cherry Bomb is a play on the name of Cherie Currie, who was only 16. Currie was the lead vocalist in the mid-to-late 1970s.

Cherry Bomb is composed by Kim Fowley and guitarist Joan Jett. Cherry Bomb was positioned 52nd on VH1’s 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs. It topped at number 6 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100.

You’re welcome to like this post, to follow the blog, and to comment. Thank you to Jim Adams for the prompt. I’ve appreciated having an opportunity to breathe new life into my blog.

Cherry Bomb
The Runaways

Can’t stay at home, can’t stay at school
Old folks say, “You poor little fool”
Down the streets I’m the girl next door
I’m the fox you’ve been waiting for
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Stone age love and strange sounds too
Come on, baby, let me get to you
Bad nights causing teenage blues
Get down ladies, you’ve got nothin’ to lose
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hey, street boy, what some style?
Your dead end dreams don’t make you smile
I’ll give you something to live for
Have you and grab you until you’re sore
Hello, daddy, hello, mom
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Hello world I’m your wild girl
I’m your ch-ch-ch-cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry bomb
Cherry Bomb

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Joan Jett / Kim Fowley
Cherry Bomb lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

FOWC with Fandango — Voracious #GiveThanks

Fandango does daily midnight writing prompts, one-word prompts to inspire his readers to post around that word. I don’t think Fandango knows me, but I know him. I think Fandango and Jim are friendly but competitive.

Tonight’s word from Fandango is the word, “voracious.” https://fivedotoh.com/2020/12/04/fowc-with-fandango-voracious/

synonyms:
insatiable · unquenchable · unappeasable

I remembered also that a tweet of mine finally got some attention, a little. You can see from my screenshot (Twitter on a desktop), that when I took the snapshot, I had twenty-five likes from visitors, and fully five retweets, which is great.

FOUR TET, THOM YORKE AND BURIAL RELEASE NEW COLLABORATIVE 12” https://mixmag.net/read/four-tet-thom-yorke-burial-release-new-collaborative-ep-news

FOUR TET, THOM YORKE AND BURIAL

Those are the musicians. Thom Yorke is who did all those great songs with Radiohead, such as Just (You Do It to Yourself). Likewise, Burial has been called, by the cool people at Pitchfork, the best electronic music going.

The three recording artists haven’t done a release together since their second, in 2011. Out of those three names, I like Thom Yorke’s music the best, and I take it he is the most famous of the three.

Usually, most days, I’m screaming into the void. However, it couldn’t be more fun. I’m confident that I have a handle, while not being too serious about it.

I assist the family by participating in my dad’s business, and while I strategize myself on WordPress and Twitter, I trade a little business of his in with the mix. It is largely a case of volunteer stakes, not a large risk rather.

http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html

https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

https://www.quora.com/profile/Patrick-Coholan

I’m thankful that the news is saying there’s a 95%-effective vaccine against the worldwide pandemic. In Canada, I think one news report said three million Canadians will be vaccinated as soon as early next year.

For now, have a great weekend!

MCMLXIX #GiveThanks

It’s a time for words of thanks.  The last few days the news has been saying that the anticipated vaccine will begin rolling out soon, to be in place next year.  It is such welcome news.

As well, the holidays are here, when people don’t act as paranoid with each other given the holiday season.  It’s an unusual holiday season, of course, owing to the impact of the pandemic.

Here on WordPress, occasionally I find specific bloggers to be interesting for me, even if they aren’t well-known, at least not yet, anyway.  One guy like that is Jim Adams, who has a blog and who has planned blog prompts through to 2021.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/11/28/domesticated-animals/

Jim has a keen interest in music and a lot of knowledge to share.  Jim’s blog prompts are great.

I remember last winter when my dad pointed out to me that the link-sharing I was doing on social media didn’t seem to be too relevant, as far as he could tell.  I help out my dad with his business.

https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited/

http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html

While I enjoy Facebook and Twitter, the day he offered that criticism about my content, I was a little miffed.  I know that my dad clowns, but I tried to look past that, to see if I could think of a better approach.

I decided a few weeks ago to take a direction that could feel more relevant, I hope, whatever the issue.  I’m chancing to utilize the focus right now that Jim provides.

I’ve been blogging since MySpace, kind of a wow.  On WordPress, I have done some posting with a bit of humour to it, and in the months since my dad said that to me about how I seem on social, I eventually decided I still wasn’t too far off the mark.

There aren’t too many “rules” for running a social presence.  When I started to read Jim, I thought it was great because I could see that, with his idea, I could collect my thoughts about the music I like.

For November 29, 2020, Jim’s prompts include, “bird.”  I know that the late Leonard Cohen made the song Bird on the Wire.

Cohen is a Canadian singer who became well-known for making music.  By the mid-1960s, Cohen started to form rock and pop melodies.  He had already written an expansive amount of writing, both poetry, and novels.

He studied at McGill in Montreal and made quite a name for himself through the sixties.  Cohen kind of burned out about that stuff in the early nineteen seventies, but his music came to him his whole career.  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame enlisted Cohen in 2008, and Leonard Cohen got a Grammy Award in 2010.

Bird on the Wire is on the record Songs from a Room, released April 1969, and is like a poem set to the sound of Cohen’s guitar.   The title Songs from a Room is very simple, understating the mastery of the music.

Songs from a Room LP

Being able to enjoy something from the years before I was born is lucky, as hearing Bird on the Wire is an experience that has power to it, sentimental.  Strange song title, eh?  A listener feels like the hardships of life have been met by others just the same, whether more talented, or more fortunate.

Photo by Burst from StockSnap

Not to sound presumptuous, but Bird on the Wire is great that way.  Leonard Cohen got into music as a popular singer when he was losing interest in writing.  Wikipedia says that Bird on the Wire is a country song, a detail which surprises me, and reading that, I thought additionally that the song just has a simplicity that sets it apart from other country songs.

The country genre of music isn’t something I understand, and maybe neither is the language of love, but when I was in college, I got to study, one semester, Canadian music.  Country music in the Canadian Prairies is a favourite choice of many resident Canadians.

I can infer that Bird on the Wire could be a favourite of many who can remember 1969.  It was years before I was born.

There is something about cowboy music, that we’ve adopted in Canada, that reflects how life in the Prairies shaped up.  The first herders calling themselves “cowboys” got to the Canadian prairies in the 1870s, riding up from the US territories of Idaho and Montana.

The romantic image of the cowboy emerged around this American subculture.  British Columbia “buckaroos” likewise sooner or later adopted the cowboy appearance.

I doubt that Cohen identified with being a cowboy; he was a novelist, poet and musician.  He identifies, I think, with the archetype of a cowboy’s passion.  I think of the scene in the Hollywood movie City Slickers, where Billy Crystal’s Mitch Robbins character plays the harmonica at the campfire.

Curly, Jack Palance’s character, interrupts the music.

Mitch Robbins:  [Playing harmonica]

Curly:  Put that away.

Mitch Robbins:  [Stops, then resumes playing harmonica]

Curly:  I said, put that away!

Mitch Robbins:  Hey you know, the first time I tried to talk to you, you embarrassed me.  So I teased you a little bit which maybe I shouldn’t have done, so I’m sorry.

And now you’re sitting over there playing with your knife, trying to frighten me – which you’re doing a good job.  But if you’re gonna kill me, get on with it; if not, shut the hell up – I’m on vacation.

City
Slickers

Wikipedia explains that before writing Bird on the Wire, Cohen carefully structured the song, before committing it to tape.  To tell the truth, before I read Wikipedia’s description, I hadn’t thought that the song would be identified as a country song.

Cohen’s music is usually in the genres of folk, and soft rock.  Romantic country music doesn’t meld with the other interests in music I have thought of.  If Bird on the Wire is a country song, it breaks, I think, with the tradition of country music that country music fans enjoy.

It’s unique that way.  I wonder if a country song should be simple, but distinctive.  The answer isn’t straightforward.

Sometimes answers to questions like that turn up unexpectedly, even if it isn’t initially clear where to begin, to get an answer to the question.  A post like this one, doing the research and writing the content, helps me understand better something that already interests me, the music.  Also, maybe somebody else interested in this blog challenge thought to say something about this specific song.

I first heard Bird on the Wire when I was in high school, the twelfth grade or so, on a simply dubbed audio cassette.  Leonard Cohen passed on November 7, 2016 (aged 82).

I saw him once in concert.  It was terrific.

Here are the lyrics to the song, followed by the song itself, in a video.

My links

https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

https://www.quora.com/profile/Patrick-Coholan

https://about.me/patrickcoholan

Bird on the Wire

Like a bird on the wire

Like a drunk in a midnight choir

I have tried in my way to be free

Like a worm on a hook

Like a knight from some old-fashioned book

I have saved all my ribbons for thee

If I, if I have been unkind

I hope that you can just let it go by

If I, if I have been untrue

I hope you know it was never to you

For like a baby, stillborn

Like a beast with his horn

I have torn everyone who reached out for me

But I swear by this song

And by all that I have done wrong

I will make it all up to thee

I saw a beggar leaning on his wooden crutch

He said to me, “you must not ask for so much”

And a pretty woman leaning in her darkened door

She cried to me, “hey, why not ask for more?”

Oh, like a bird on the wire

Like a drunk in a midnight choir

I have tried in my way to be free

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Leonard Cohen

Bird on the Wire lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

https://youtu.be/BmPUu-rMpWA

MCMXC

This blog gets me crossing paths with individuals who have something to add about the world as they understand it.  Like the Discover feature on TikTok, imagination is an alluring quality.  

Jim Adams is a writer with a fascination for music, who concocts prompts for a blog.  He thinks of words for participants to find in song titles, or lyrics, in a blog format.

Participants discuss the songs with a common element, the writing prompt, as it appears in the lyrics, or in the song title.  I am very late to the challenge this week, but I have seen Jim’s observe about his prompts, “better late than never.”

Photo by Matt Jones from StockSnap

Today’s a Thursday–another favourite blog of mine, Beauty Beyond Bones, goes live Thursday evenings.  In fact I am posting opposite hers tonight.

Although, this fall, her focus has often been on the election, BBB being an American, I can still with a clear conscience recommend her blog.  She is a kind Catholic girl who writes about the inspiration Jesus has for her when her eating disorder challenges her.  She has been in recovery something like thirteen years now.

https://beautybeyondbones.com/

I am new to Jim’s challenge.  I have read some of his participants’ blog discussions and I have followed along some of what is new with Jim–he has organized the challenge right through to 2021.  He publishes the prompts carefully, only a few at a time, to let his followers know what is coming.

For November 8, Jim prompted “days of the week,” and the song I thought of is Monday Morning, by the band The Church.  It has taken me a good deal longer than I anticipated to get this post ready and finished, but I thought the finished post might be good enough that I should go ahead and post it, whether or not I’m so late for Sunday’s challenge.

The Church is a rock band with a dark flavour for their music, rarely undemanding, weird at times, and atmospheric.  It’s not from my part of the world, but I like it.

The Church

The Church in the year 1990 wrote Monday Morning, singer Steve Kilbey, drummer Richard Ploog, guitarist Marty Wilson-Piper, and, guitarist Peter Koppes, for the record Gold Afternoon Fix.  The name of the album is an expression from the stock market, made here into an album title with a bit of a sense of humour.

At the time, The Church excused the completed collection as an innovative disappointment.   The percussion on the melodies didn’t turn out.

One of the songs for Gold Afternoon Fix is entitled Disappointment.  “Late for an appointment, clothes everywhere/I cannot find my memory anywhere/Ah disappointment just doesn’t care,” Kilbey sings.

I think Monday Morning is a song that initially appeared only on the CD release of the album, not the LP.  For me, The Church is a charming band, and I believe founding songwriter Steve Kilbey has since allowed that his original opinion about the album needn’t have been so critical.

The Church began in 1980 as a new wave band, a music genre emerging after the punk rock scene.  The Church was pretty noisy, good, though.  By 1983 they were making more experimental music.

By creative failure, I only mean music that lacks integrity, bad music.  That’s not The Church.  They are a band I quite like.

The chief problem with Gold Afternoon Fix is really that the personnel couldn’t come to an agreement about the percussion.  The melodies are very acceptable at any rate.  For example, I like the tune Monday Morning.

Perhaps the song is about a weekend fling, the freedom of time spent away, as from office life, when a free heart gets heavy again, when Monday morning arrives, and the weekend has dispersed.

The Church was in L.A. and the culture of the day must have touched on the lyrics Kilbey wrote for the record.  The air was full of energy.  “Oh Monday morning, the cracks become quite clear,” Kilbey sings.

As far as the discography by The Church, Gold Afternoon Fix followed their record Starfish, their 1988 album, which was a major achievement for them, and which contains the exemplary melody Under the Milky Way.  The record Priest = Aura followed two years after the fact, in 1992, which Kilbey further views as the band’s show-stopper.  Steve Kilbey recalls fondly the 1990s in Sydney, Australia, he’s said on Twitter–I imagine that is the place where he withdrew.

Starfish

Gold Afternoon Fix is an album I like, and albums by The Church are often pretty good.  The band did have trouble getting the percussion for Gold Afternoon Fix correct, and drummer Richard Ploog only plays drums on four of the songs on the album.  The other songs have the beat of a drum machine.

Other than Steve Kilbey writing occasional new material with a drum machine, the band had never considered using that kind of percussion on an album.  They’d become known for being a great beat.  Richard Ploog, the drummer, couldn’t finish recording the drums for Gold Afternoon Fix, however.

Mr. Ploog’s interest in music had stopped meeting the vision the other members of the band had, for the songs.  Ploog’s energy was turning into contention, with the interest in music the other three artists had.

Ironically, one of the first songs The Church did is called Too Fast for You.  “Oh, and I hope I’m not going too fast for you/And don’t believe it when they say it’s over,” Kilbey sings.

Wikipedia says drummer Nick Ward played on their first collection; through the 1980s the band’s steady drummer, for a very long time, 1982-1990, was Richard, who left the band after Gold Afternoon Fix.  It doesn’t look to me like Wikipedia is altogether exact; I can see focuses that I don’t accept are right.  Mr. Ploog withdrew from The Church around 1990, to invest more energy with his better half.

In Marty Wilson-Piper’s blog, an entry Wilson-Piper wrote in October 2011, Wilson-Piper explains that Monday Morning is one of the four songs that Mr. Ploog is playing on.  Marty Wilson-Piper is one of the founding members of the band, along with Kilbey and Koppes.  He calls attention to Peter Koppes’ mandolin, on the melody, and that is somewhat enough to appreciate the tune.

Mandolin

Monday Morning is one of the last songs Mr. Ploog played on while The Church was a big commercial act.  They’ve remained to make records for years, but after 1990 they weren’t the same band, however good Priest = Aura turned out to be (a good album, too).

Artificial Photography

In my first year of school, 1996, I read a gathering about The Church.  There were some jokes about The Church’s concert film for Gold Afternoon Fix turning up in retail discount bins.  It was a joke about Gold Afternoon Fix not being their best album.

All things considered, fans’ excitement for The Church was unmistakable, and Richard Ploog got a ton of regard from audience members.  Gold Afternoon Fix also sold very well, commercially successful.  Ironically, the commercial rock was hard to combine with artistic integrity, Mr. Wilson-Piper’s comments reflect in his blog.

The difference between Gold Afternoon Fix and some of the earlier collections of music by The Church, like Remote Luxury and Persia, in 1984 and 1985, that the band’s vision for their music came across loud and clear on releases like the aforementioned, and was much more subdued, so to speak, by 1990.  To tell the truth, I don’t know that the meaning of a song like Shadow Cabinet is at all clear to me; however, Shadow Cabinet was the name of their fan webpage.  Though years ago, I am sure it would have seemed to be quite a simple page compared to how it might have been today; pictures and blocks of text, I recall.

I sat in one of the rooms of the home of one of my uncles looking for The Church on AOL.  The Church was one of my very first Internet searches ever, and certainly the first band that I researched on the Internet.

The meaning of the lyrics for Monday Morning are clearer for me than words like “Queueing in the ruins in the wake of the gale it’s/Harmony I say” in Shadow Cabinet.  I like the soul of what Steve Kilbey is singing there.

These days Steve Kilbey is a very small YouTuber, and both Koppes and Wilson-Piper have moved on from The Church.  Koppes continues to write and record music, as does Kilbey; both had new albums in September of this year.  I’m not completely sure what Wilson-Piper has been doing.

Fans of The Church are sometimes referred to as their Army.

Thank you to Jim for his prompt, “days of the week.”  You should take a look at Jim’s blog.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/11/07/a-week-is-a-unit-of-time/

As well, you’re welcome to like, follow and/or comment here.

https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

https://www.quora.com/profile/Patrick-Coholan

https://about.me/patrickcoholan

Monday Morning

Beyond the city, and evening dust

Dreams and thunder rattle the rust

You had an idea that you won’t have again

She’s forgotten your name and hopes you’ll do the same

Start of the ash, and the end of the flames

Burning you turning you

There was a lifetime spent in the sun

Hundreds of chances, blew every one

Dice rolled, double six, double six, double six

Owner of trouble, flesh blood and bricks

You had an idea that you won’t have again

She’s forgotten your name and hopes you’ll do the same

The start of the ash and the end of the flames

Turning you burning you

Oh Monday morning, the cracks become quite clear

Oh Monday morning, take me back, leave me hare

Beyond the city, and evening dust

Dreams and thunder rattle the rust

You had an idea that you won’t have again

She’s forgotten your name and hopes you’ll do the same

Start of the ash, and the end of the flames

Burning you turning you around

//genius.com/songs/1178162/embed.js

Monday Morning

MCMLXXXVIII

May I begin by saying that, in 2017, USA Today said that a Realtor.com study had about a third of respondents state that they would think about an opportunity to live in a spooky house.  Numerous film and writing have investigated the possibility, and I know a particular case of music investigating the hereafter.  That’s what this post is about, a song about living with a ghost.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/10/25/how-many-people-believe-ghosts-dead-spirits/794215001/

By the way, from time to time, I work for a cemetery, called Maple Lawn Cemetery  http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html  I’ve been doing it since 2011, ten years.  We care for the grounds of the cemetery, handled inquiries, and maintain a Facebook page for the business.

Maple Lawn Cemetery

It’s not in isolation–on WordPress, author Jim Adams has come up with good blogging prompts, for October.  His style is daily blogging that’s in good fun and shows a good aptitude for writing and a healthy interest in music.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/10/24/dress-up-day/#respond

For October 25, 2020, Jim’s prompts include the word, “ghost.”

I appreciate a decent brief and Jim had a kind comment for me when I last participated in his blog hop, two weeks ago.  I was glad to be welcomed aboard.

I’m discussing today, “There’s a Ghost in My House,” a Fall song, a hit for the underground Manchester band.  The Fall recorded a version of a 1967 northern soul song, which is a style of UK dance music.  The northern soul was a variation on the style of the day, in U.S. clubs.

Northern soul

With “There’s a Ghost in my House,” The Fall’s songwriter, Mark E. Smith, took the notoriety of The Fall’s noisy stage act far and wide.  The Fall received some critical acclaim, despite their strange sound, and despite a large number of personnel who were members of the band over the years.

The member who was a constant was singer Mark E. Smith.  “There’s a Ghost in My House” got a second life when The Fall did it for their album called Domesday Pay-Off.  The song “There’s a Ghost in My House” is a hit, their first hit, getting to no. 30.

I’m not sure Mark E. Smith took the northern soul scene all that seriously because he didn’t take rock music real serious, but he did work on the band a great deal, putting out a lot of records over the years, with many different directions evident.  Smith drew the name The Fall from an existential novel, by Albert Camus, nothing to do with autumn time, in case that’s a point of confusion.

I assume “There’s a Ghost in My House” was The Fall’s choice to more readily relate to American music.  The pop stylings of the song were the contribution of Smith’s spouse Brix Smith, whose pop flavour for The Fall endured the nineteen-eighties.

Brix Smith

“There’s a Ghost in My House” is not characteristic of The Fall’s music, nor did the band, with any line-up, want to play it much.  I bet that The Fall wanted radio and club play by DJs of the day.  The decision created a popularity for The Fall and took them in the direction of pop.

Their earlier record albums, however, showcased few pop elements.

Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Eddie Holland, of the famed Motown Records label, wrote, “There’s a Ghost in My House,” together with R. Dean Taylor.  I am not sure if Motown Records responded favourably to The Fall’s interest in their history as a music label, but I suspect not, given that The Fall did not return to the material very often.  Motown Records had originated in Detroit and moved to NYC.

“There’s a Ghost in my House” is a great melody.  On the off chance that you are examining The Fall’s discography, it’s anything but an ill-conceived notion to begin there.

Without any commercial success, a music single, however ingenious, remains a failure.  However, it speaks to the artist’s intentions, and there are dozens of Fall albums, going back to the beginning of the nineteen-eighties.  Smith’s singing has the odd characteristic of extra syllables he added at the end of words he sang, no joke.

Mark E. Smith’s lyrics could be described as semi-nonsensical.  As an artist, Smith had a lot of power because he had so many ideas by which to explore a unique approach to rock music, and by an apparent willingness to change about.  By that I mean Mark E. Smith and his band always remained The Fall, but tackled different experiments, of noise-making, for their music.

I’ve read Camus, the writer whose novel The Fall inspired the name of Smith’s band, but I don’t know that Camus was an influence on Mark E. Smith’s music.  H. P. Lovecraft, according to Wikipedia, is one such influence, Lovecraft the sci-fi author who died in 1937, leaving a pantheon of stories behind about monster gods ruling Earth.  The difference between Camus and Lovecraft is night and day, Camus thinking very much about man’s solitude in this lifetime, Lovecraft exploring what came before and themes of despair in the face of utter monstrosity.

Despite the decline of The Fall in the late nineties, Smith found a resurgence for The Fall in the last decade of his life.  Smith died when he was sixty, in 2018.

Mark E. Smith

He had remained interested in experimenting with rock music and had a great career throughout his time in The Fall.  Some of his remarks about other rock musicians were harsh in tone, despite his contemporaries’ respect for his music.  A 2011 article in the New Yorker recalled that, despite Sonic Youth having played covers of Fall songs on BBC radio, Smith only returned the favor by declaring that the BBC should revoke Sonic Youth’s “rock license.”

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2011/11/14/plug-and-play

Thank you to Jim Adams for the blogging prompts.  Have a safe and happy Halloween!  I hope the trying circumstances of the year to date have not been overwhelming for you.

I blog for fun.  You’re welcome to like this post, to follow the blog, or to leave a comment.  I found Jim’s blog through good luck, by looking through WordPress.

My links

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons

Quora https://www.quora.com/profile/Patrick-Coholan

About Me https://about.me/patrickcoholan

There’s a Ghost in My House

There’s a ghost in my house

The ghost of your memory

The ghost of the love that was took from me

Our love used to be

Only shadows in the past I see

Times can’t seem to’ve erased

The vision of your smiling face

Dead flowers I sent thee

I can’t get over ye

There’s a ghost in my house

I can’t hide (ghost in my house)

For the ghost of your love is inside (ghost in my house)

Keeps on haunting me (ghost in my house)

Just keeps on becalling me (ghost in my house)

Down in my tea cup

I see your face looking up

Sitting in my easy chair

I feel your fingers running through my hair

Though we’re far apart

Your spectre’s in my heart

There’s a ghost in my house

I can’t hide (ghost in my house)

For the ghost of your love is inside (ghost in my house)

Keeps on haunting me (ghost in my house)

Still just a part of me (ghost in my house)

By the way I hang my head

You can see I’m afraid

Thought my heart knows you’re gone

My mind keeps rolling on

There’s a ghost in my house

I can’t hide

In my house I am helpless

practice superstitious

I hear footsteps on the stairs

I know there’s no-one there

Keeps on haunting me

Keeps on haunting me

There’s a ghost in my house

A ghost of your memory

A ghost of the love that was took from me

Ghost in my house…

MCMLXXXIX

I liked to read when I was a young kid.

In the early 2000s, the Internet, a frontier, the first blog I wrote was on MySpace. A girl I’d met in school said it was a brilliant site. It was a real long time ago.

These days, all these years later, I was looking at the post-https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/10/03/no-rules/ -when I got an idea. Jim suggested that fans teach specific insights into the songs they enjoyed.

For the eleventh of October, Jim suggested a few prompts, such as the word Hold, which reminded me of Hold On, on the Lou Reed album “New York,” a good album. The idea of the prompt is to identify a song with a specific word in the title, or the lyrics.

The late Lou Reed was a singer and guitarist whose album “The Velvet Underground & Nico” made a name for himself. Over twenty years later, the song Hold On, on the record New York, was more of Reed’s art-rock, ostensibly intellectually-minded rock music, if you consult a definition of art-rock. Art rock features elements of a classical style, as in, with Hold On, the stand-up bass instrumentation by Rob Wasserman, who played the bass parts throughout the album.

Last month, the label Rhino put out an interesting new edition of Reed’s New York. What was an hour of songs in 1989 that provided insight that only someone like Lou Reed could have, two decades earlier Reed had enjoyed the opportunity to be managed by pop artist Andy Warhol, in 1966, ’67, and ’68. Reed was an enigma of the music scene in NYC.

1989

Now Rhino has presented three entire records to expand upon the original album. They’ve presented the same songs as on the 1989 album, now also in live recordings of the songs, and also alternate versions characteristically called rough mixes. The new edition further includes a DVD edition of the concert film for the New York record.

The song Hold On speaks, it’s clear, to life in New York City. The lyrics seem to recall news stories about the city, as in, for example, the first verse of the song recalling the twentieth of December 1986. That’s when a racially charged beating by the police, of two African-Americans, in Howard Beach, contributed to tensions throughout the city.

I think Reed was guardedly optimistic that the problem of racism in NYC would change, as black people continued to be less compromised by race and social class.

I also think Reed could have been thinking of the impact Warhol made on the art world, with lyrics for Hold On like, “Something’s happening here.” I think beyond singing about the flavour of life in the city, and it’s a powerful song, there’s a theme how Warhol’s art had reverberated mightily, so the idea that something’s “happening,” a word tied to Reed’s shows with the Velvet Underground, and the dynamic of the art-rock he wrote while managed by Warhol must speak to that, I take it. A “happening” was the style of Velvet Underground shows under Warhol’s direction, including projections of Warhol’s films, strange light, and the loud noise of the band.

Photo by Dmitri Popov from StockSnap

There is evident power in Reed’s voice, in the song. The Tompkins Square Park revolt happened on August 6–7, 1988, the year before, in Tompkins Square Park, situated in the East Village and Alphabet City neighbourhoods of Manhattan. Gatherings of drug pushers, vagrants and also youngsters had assumed control.

The Big Apple

I think, without art, people don’t have the same legacy they have had, ever since cavemen drew pictures. I also think the creative components of social media draw in many artistic people. Look, here are the lyrics to Hold On.

You’re welcome to “like,” follow, or comment. Thanks to Jim Adams for the prompt “Hold.”

Hold On

There’s blacks with knives and whites with clubs
Fighting in Howard Beach
There’s no such thing as human rights
When you walk the N.Y.streets

A cop was shot in the head by a 10 years old kid
Named Buddah in Central Park last week
The fathers and daughters are lined up by the coffins
By the Statue of Bigotry, hey

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
Well, I meet you in Tompkins Square

The dopers sent a message to the cops last weekend
They shot him in the car where he sat
And Eleanor Bumpers and Michael Stewart
Must have appreciated that

There’s a rampaging rage rising up like a plague
Of bloody vials washing up on the beach
It’ll take more than the Angels or Iron Mike Tyson
To heal this bloody breach, hey, hey

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
I’m gonna meet you in Tompkins Square

A junkie ran down a lady a pregnant dancer
She’ll never dance but the baby was saved
He shot up some China White and nodded out at the wheel
And he doesn’t remember a thing
They shot that old lady ’cause they thought she was a witness to
A crime she didn’t even see
Whose home is the home of the brave
By the Statue of Bigotry, hey

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
Meet you in Tompkins Square

You got a black .38 and a gravity knife
You still have to ride the train
There’s the smelly essence of N.Y. down there
But you ain’t no Bernard Goetz, ah
There’s no Mafia lawyer to fight in your corner
For that 15 minutes of fame
The have and the have nots are bleeding in the tub
That’s New York’s future not mine, oh

You better hold on
Something’s happening here
You better hold on
You better, something’s happening here
Hold on, ooohhh, babe

Hold On

What the World Would Be Like If Fringe Opinions Didn’t Exist

Trump administration appeals yet another TikTok ruling —https://www.theverge.com/2020/12/28/22203284/trump-administration-appeal-tiktok-china-bytedance

CNN tech reporter — Brian Fung

The news came in the end of September that Donald Trump affirmed the takeover of TikTok by firms Walmart and Oracle.  An eleventh-hour victory is how the website CNET put it that evening. It was an exciting day.

The issue that Trump made of TikTok’s conduct is that ostensibly TikTok was opening a doorway for China to collect unwarrant data on American TikTok users which would put the States at risk given a perceived interest in China gaining a foothold on Big Tech, at home in Silicon Valley. It was a highlight of Big Tech drama and in the months ahead, eventually the States’ FTC made the move of demanding clarity on what is going on with user data.

FTC orders ByteDance, Facebook, Snap and others to explain what they do with user data https://techcrunch.com/2020/12/14/ftc-tiktok-amazon-facebook-social-media-study/

Photo by Markus Spiske from StockSnap

For perspective on the deal moving TikTok from China to the U.S., I watched someordinarygamers, who was doing videos about it.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

someordinarygamers: https://www.youtube.com/user/SomeOrdinaryGamers

About what people say on the Internet, so many people communicate on the Internet about fringe.  someordinarygamers is into things like playing retro videogames, but he also looks at a lot of Internet issues that sometimes are only superficially related. The channel is often funny, meaning Mutahar has a sense of humour, whether navigating Minecraft, or a particularly cringy Twitter thread, as much as he can make himself heard on has YouTube, which is pretty large given his success. That’s his name, right, Mutahar? The emcee at someordinarygamers

You can see the difference between, say, an ambitious young TikTokker aiming for fame, and a fringe TikTokker just kind of shouting out to whoever.  It isn’t a subtle distinction.

That said, someordinarygamers does have a pretty good YouTube channel.

Related

Epic Star Wars Concept Art Shows Rey Taking On A Ton Of Stormtroopers https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2555166/epic-star-wars-concept-art-shows-rey-taking-on-a-ton-of-stormtroopers

Do you enjoy Star Wars? The inveterately well-known movie, the first one, released by Twentieth Century Fox in 1977, can be quoted with the following.  “It was as if a million voices cried out in pain/And were suddenly silenced,” Obiwan, played by the late Alec Guinness, laments to Han Solo, played by Harrison Ford, and to Luke Skywalker, played by Mark Hamill, aboard Han’s ship, the Millennium Falcon, during their search for Princess Leia, played by late Carrie Fisher. Darth Vader, played by the departed David Prowse and voiced by James Earl Jones, having kidnapped her.

At that moment in the film, the Empire, under the command of Vader and of Grand Moff Tarkin, played by the also departed Peter Cushing, has just destroyed her home planet, with the power of the Death Star, and Obiwan knows it, thanks to The Force.

“oh no!”

That’s how it would have been in the eventuality that the Trump administration banned TikTok (my tie-in).  The greatest issue is that the Chinese government would have picked up a lot of data, about TikTok, trading off U.S. security.

Photo by Lenharth Systems from StockSnap

Related

The Four Benefits of Data Mining: Google’s Side of the Data Story  https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/next-gen-infosec/four-benefits-data-mining-google/

In the late eighties, I had a tape duplicate of 1977’s George Lucas-directed Star Wars.  The story of the Rebel Alliance appealed to me very much, the way it does for so many.

The nature of social media is to turn user ideas into content.  Idly put, the site Portia’s Content Generator helped turn this subject into a workable draft idea. Since then, I’ve worked out some stronger ideas–more on that to come.

Often, like on Facebook, a social media post can be a photo (or several), an emoji, or a hashtag, all of which are elements that add up to a status report, a post.  In Silicon Valley, Facebook was like the best idea in the world in 2007, something that earned a fortune, and had an impact on people’s behaviour all over the world.

The 2010 David Fincher film The Social Network, all about Facebook, is a terrific movie, a masterful film.  It may not contain an account of the devastation of the planet of Alderaan, but with The Social Network you get some appreciation of how Facebook has the capacity among people, around the planet, to favour constant unequivocal activity.  Anyone with a social media account can be a keyboard warrior.

When a gallant Jedi Knight, Darth Vader was tempted, turned into a Sith Lord, and drove the Empire’s annihilation of the Jedi Order

If Facebook tossed a rulebook of dictator guidelines at its users, I can’t help thinking about how media would become in a “scene” like that.  Ha, well, it would be Orwellian, if it isn’t already.

Orwellian alludes to being of a dictator nature.  If you don’t know, an algorithm is a mathematical formula, in the purest sense of the word, and when you put the word into a social media context, the word means the method of delivering content of specific interest to you.  That is why social media is addictive.

I surmise that an autonomous voice relies upon that if it needs to communicate itself, in any shape.  Without autonomy, it would be, I think, a market with only the dullest of billboards to show, nothing to write home about.

Goods consigned and a surfeit of the ordinary. Should news info should be professionally-packaged, light on ads, accurate and not misleading, and properly researched and based in reality?  That is all well and good, but it implies that a beginning blogger may not reach the starting gate without being subject to specific, and somewhat arbitrary, rules of conduct.

I’ve heard, like on someordinarygamers, on YouTube, that the component of the Internet which is your most valuable currency is data. In fact, again today Mutahar put out a video that explores what Facebook and Instagram are doing with user data.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEgmvdrQXG0

There is a call for public news and music industry Top 40 hits, yes.  However, every stipend ought to be made for periphery who have a right to speak as freely as the most prevailing of media.

Everyone who likes YouTube videos experiences this hiccup.  Trying to make a living as a YouTuber, when creators on YouTube aren’t getting through to viewers, the views on their videos begin to slow down.  Some YouTubers talk about that, contending with the algorithm that holds back videos.

“oh no!”

We all should practice diligence using social media.  I am not sure we need to delete Facebook and Instagram, as Mutahar encourages, but his note of caution is worth giving a listen. I wouldn’t mind if someordinarygamers looked again at how TikTok’s new corporate structure will turn out.

You may now return to your regularly scheduled program.

Happy new year, and good luck.

opps

A typical spelling of the outcry “oh no!”

Opps! I tYpOed agAiN!!! lololololo

“oh no!”

If you are interested, you’re welcome to “like,” “follow,” or comment.  Good luck with your blogging.

substance ought to be: steady, helpful,

pertinent, unique, exceptional, new, educative, client and network driven, intriguing, interesting, to change, to be easy to peruse and share it

through media, to have

viral power and give positive

“buzz,” just as that more

content is fundamental

Online, you should always be kind to a beginner.  You will acquire everything by recognizing you are deficient and subject to God. 🙂

Prepositions of Place

Hi, I just read a fun post dated yesterday that got some people sharing music. It’s prompt words, Above/Below/Between in this case, that are utilized in a music challenge of finding music. The lyrics would contain the prompt words.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/08/22/prepositions-of-place/

The Beach House song Take Care doesn’t meet the criteria of utilizing one of the prompt words, but the lyrics to the song contain the words beside and inside, which are other words that are used to describe object placement. Maybe those two words could be future prompts.

The songwriters are Alex Scally and Victoria Legrand. Looks like it’s connected to the promising film Chemical Hearts.

https://blog.discogs.com/en/best-of-the-decade-beach-house/

I follow Fandango on WordPress and he commented in the last hour on the Prepositions of Place post that he would reblog Prepositions of Place. That’s how I caught onto the fun.

Beach House – Take Care (Chemical Hearts)

Stand beside it, we can’t hide the way it makes us glow
It’s no good unless it grows, feel this burning, love of mine
Deep inside the ever-spinning, tell me does it feel?
It’s no good unless it’s real, hillsides burning
Wild-eyed turning ’til we’re running from it

I’d take care of you if you ask me to
In a year or two, oh oh oh

You say swimming in the lake we’ll come across a snake
It is real and then it’s fake, feel its heartbeat
Feel what you heat, far so fast it feels too late

I’ll take care of you if you’d ask me to
In a year or two, oh oh oh

I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true
I’ll take care of you, take care of you
That’s true