How would you describe your favorite photo? #bloganuary

When I was young, when a girlfriend and I went to the regional butterfly conservatory, I took a photo of her smiling and seeming happy while seated in the semi-tropical environment. I took it with an old-fashioned camera. The negative is likely lost, and the photo has begun to curl. I was happy to think of it, though, when I read the prompt from WordPress.

Nowadays, I have a Sony camera that I take pictures with, from the time of Windows 8. Looking through the photos app on my desktop, I remember a photo dated the afternoon of one Wednesday in September 2014. It’s a photo of the field near the building that used to be a church, and which belongs to my dad, most of it being maintained by him and a few others. I had a FinePix Z1, and it was easy to get the photo. You can see the clouds peeking through the trees are a little bright, and the sunlit grass of the field is a little bright too. By then, I’d had a couple of years’ experience of being self-employed. The riding mower in the background is how I cut the grass every week.

Wednesday‎, ‎September‎ ‎3‎, ‎2014 1:59 PM

It meant a great deal to me, and I’m afraid some of my enthusiasm has waned. I surmise I’ve run into burnout. I do enjoy maintaining a tiny presence on Facebook for the cemetery. It’s the core of my dad’s business, and I do a lot of other social media that isn’t all geared to Maple Lawn Cemetery, which is our cemetery, or about Catholicism, or anything else like that. For example, I am participating in these January writing prompts because they are fun for me, and they are making January more fun than it would have been.

My better half nowadays is magnificent. It’s not the girl from the butterfly conservatory, but what can you do? I don’t think she characteristically wants her photo taken, but maybe I’ll ask her again.

I hope you like the photo.

https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited/
https://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html
https://vymaps.com/CA/Louth-United-Church-And-Maple-Lawn-Cemetery-106942219457401/

Nine Years a Nonprofit Part III

My father has put energy into a venture during his retirement called Maple Lawn, a cemetery.  With help from family and friends, including me, the cemetery makes a good impression on visitors.  We began in the fall of 2012, nine years ago, and I’ve been blogging on WordPress in this space of time, kind of about whatever.

July 2014. Having put in nearly two years at Maple Lawn Cemetery, behind this church, I had more of a practiced hand in whatever I did there

We’ve always had a Facebook page, so we can be contacted by means other than the phone, and what Facebook is doing now has been almost mindboggling for me, in a good way, but strange, too.  

https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited/

Again, today, news reports indicated that Facebook is continuing to combat efforts by Russians to have control in the Presidential race, efforts by Russia that already took aim, in 2016.  I am trying to keep my interest in social media sort of unbiased, but I am perplexed by how Facebook is represented in the news.

In his lifetime author Kurt Vonnegut wrote the novel Bluebeard, he says in the foreword, to reflect on how it was to feel he was starting to get old.  The novel has an ironic, but serious, tone.  When I read it, I felt better about my passing regard for abstract expressionism.

When I was a kid, I had the good fortune to see abstract expressionism.  While I didn’t know anything about it as a kid, I was impressed that an artist could make works like that, and people would admire it as art.  When I was trying out an image to cover my blog, I thought that, in the style of abstract expressionism, the colours blue and green, arranged in solid lines and similar shapes, might prove adequate for the purpose I wanted to blog.

In the very early 2000s, a girl I’d met while she was panhandling for spare funds indicated she had an interest in Livejournal, and to understand her life journey, I needed to “visit” her on both mySpace, and on Livejournal.  That’s where I got a start on the ideas I have about social media, especially blogging (and microblogging), thanks to her.

Both of my grandmas painted.  Before I was adequately brilliant to comprehend, the grip I had was that my grandma, on my mom’s side of the family, painted, and that made her creative.  I didn’t think to separate earning enough money to pay the rent from having a grandmother do some painting, for a diversion.

Not too many people take photos with a camera these days.  It is usually with a phone.  Or else people are more interested in video.

I am glad I can take reasonably intelligent photos.  If I shoot a video I am never as pleased with it as when I take stills.  When I place pictures in the blog, regardless of whether they are messy stock photographs or pictures I save from Google, or photos I have taken myself, I like doing that part especially, adding in the pictures.

November 22, 2014. An empty grave and my father, Peter, who’s the first operator

The odd time I include a photo by family, and as a matter of fact, on the weekend, my godmother left me a comment that made me wonder if she was thinking that I need to do Facebook posts a lot better than I currently am.  I am wondering a little what people make of Zuckerberg’s new idea about the metaverse (and Meta).

There is a very decent possibility I will grind away for the year ahead–it is my intention.  I do what I can with my time.   If you want, you can like this post or follow or comment.

You can also email me at patrickcoholan@hotmail.com

Nine Years a Nonprofit Part I

This is an excerpt of a blog post I am working on that recalls the nine years I have put it in a family not-for-profit business. A blogger called Fandango suggested readers write posts centered on the word assist. As it so happened, I have a post I’m editing that lends itself to that word, a form of the word that I have included in the first paragraph, that I thought I would contribute to Fandango’s effort in the first part of what will be three parts.

https://maplelawncemetery.org/

July 2013

It was in October 2012 that I took up working a graveyard, in the town where I reside, where I came from.

My dad, Peter, got a burial ground to make do, with my assistance. His business is a charitable one, not unusual for a retired person. For a good number of years, he had been the manager of the municipal cemetery locally.

I think he probably handled the job at the bigger cemetery with an air of stoicism, which is normal for a person professionally handling grieving. It is a good position to take any time death enters the conversation.

Each plant, creature, and individual inevitably passes, as dismal as that is. Stoicism is the mental process of remaining detached.  I try not to engage too much mentally with the idea of stoicism, as I experience emotion, of course, and I am not sure it is healthy to detach too much from the experience of feeling real emotion.

Sometimes relationship advice for men I hear lends itself to the idea that stoicism is the best strategy for talking to women.

A lady’s reaction, the unemotional man prompts you, isn’t to acknowledge a lady’s reaction to you. It sounds unwholesome, yet meeting ladies who begin to like you is a numbers game, except if you are youthful, attractive, fit, and rich. That might be too obtuse to even think about fully articulating, yet I see where exhortation like that is coming from.

#FOWC Fandango’s One-Word Challenge

MCMLXXXVIII

May I begin by saying that, in 2017, USA Today said that a Realtor.com study had about a third of respondents state that they would think about an opportunity to live in a spooky house.  Numerous film and writing have investigated the possibility, and I know a particular case of music investigating the hereafter.  That’s what this post is about, a song about living with a ghost.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/10/25/how-many-people-believe-ghosts-dead-spirits/794215001/

By the way, from time to time, I work for a cemetery, called Maple Lawn Cemetery  http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html  I’ve been doing it since 2011, ten years.  We care for the grounds of the cemetery, handled inquiries, and maintain a Facebook page for the business.

Maple Lawn Cemetery

It’s not in isolation–on WordPress, author Jim Adams has come up with good blogging prompts, for October.  His style is daily blogging that’s in good fun and shows a good aptitude for writing and a healthy interest in music.

https://jimadamsauthordotcom.wordpress.com/2020/10/24/dress-up-day/#respond

For October 25, 2020, Jim’s prompts include the word, “ghost.”

I’m discussing today, “There’s a Ghost in My House,” a Fall song, a hit for the underground Manchester band.  The Fall recorded a version of a 1967 northern soul song, which is a style of UK dance music.  The northern soul was a variation on the style of the day, in U.S. clubs.

Northern soul

With “There’s a Ghost in my House,” The Fall’s songwriter, Mark E. Smith, took the notoriety of The Fall’s noisy stage act far and wide.  The Fall received some critical acclaim, despite their strange sound, and despite a large number of personnel who were members of the band over the years.

The member who was a constant was singer Mark E. Smith.  “There’s a Ghost in My House” got a second life when The Fall did it for their album called Domesday Pay-Off.

I’m not sure Mark E. Smith took the northern soul scene all that seriously because he didn’t take rock music real serious, but he did work on the band a great deal, putting out a lot of records over the years, with many different directions evident.  Smith drew the name The Fall from an existential novel, by Albert Camus, nothing to do with autumn time, in case that’s a point of confusion.

I assume “There’s a Ghost in My House” was The Fall’s choice to more readily relate to American music.

Brix Smith

“There’s a Ghost in My House” is not characteristic of The Fall’s music, nor did the band, with any line-up, want to play it much.  I bet that The Fall wanted radio and club play by DJs of the day.  The decision created a popularity for The Fall and took them in the direction of pop.

Their earlier record albums, however, showcased few pop elements.

Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Eddie Holland, of the famed Motown Records label, wrote, “There’s a Ghost in My House,” together with R. Dean Taylor.  Motown Records had originated in Detroit and moved to NYC.

Without any commercial success, a music single, however ingenious, remains a failure.  However, it speaks to the artist’s intentions, and there are dozens of Fall albums, going back to the beginning of the nineteen-eighties.  Smith’s singing has the odd characteristic of extra syllables he added at the end of words he sang, no joke.

Mark E. Smith’s lyrics could be described as semi-nonsensical.  As an artist, Smith had a lot of power because he had so many ideas by which to explore a unique approach to rock music, and by an apparent willingness to change about.  By that I mean Mark E. Smith and his band always remained The Fall, but tackled different experiments, of noise-making, for their music.

I’ve read Camus, the writer whose novel The Fall inspired the name of Smith’s band, but I don’t know that Camus was an influence on Mark E. Smith’s music.  H. P. Lovecraft, according to Wikipedia, is one such influence, Lovecraft the sci-fi author who died in 1937, leaving a pantheon of stories behind about monster gods ruling Earth.  The difference between Camus and Lovecraft is night and day, Camus thinking very much about man’s solitude in this lifetime, Lovecraft exploring what came before and themes of despair in the face of utter monstrosity.

Despite the decline of The Fall in the late nineties, Smith found a resurgence for The Fall in the last decade of his life.  Smith died when he was sixty, in 2018.

Mark E. Smith

He had remained interested in experimenting with rock music and had a great career throughout his time in The Fall.  Some of his remarks about other rock musicians were harsh in tone, despite his contemporaries’ respect for his music.  A 2011 article in the New Yorker recalled that, despite Sonic Youth having played covers of Fall songs on BBC radio, Smith only returned the favor by declaring that the BBC should revoke Sonic Youth’s “rock license.”

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2011/11/14/plug-and-play

I hope the trying circumstances of the year to date have not been overwhelming for you.

You’re welcome to like this post, to follow the blog, or to leave a comment.

There’s a Ghost in My House

There’s a ghost in my house

The ghost of your memory

The ghost of the love that was took from me

Our love used to be

Only shadows in the past I see

Times can’t seem to’ve erased

The vision of your smiling face

Dead flowers I sent thee

I can’t get over ye

There’s a ghost in my house

I can’t hide (ghost in my house)

For the ghost of your love is inside (ghost in my house)

Keeps on haunting me (ghost in my house)

Just keeps on becalling me (ghost in my house)

Down in my tea cup

I see your face looking up

Sitting in my easy chair

I feel your fingers running through my hair

Though we’re far apart

Your spectre’s in my heart

There’s a ghost in my house

I can’t hide (ghost in my house)

For the ghost of your love is inside (ghost in my house)

Keeps on haunting me (ghost in my house)

Still just a part of me (ghost in my house)

By the way I hang my head

You can see I’m afraid

Thought my heart knows you’re gone

My mind keeps rolling on

There’s a ghost in my house

I can’t hide

In my house I am helpless

practice superstitious

I hear footsteps on the stairs

I know there’s no-one there

Keeps on haunting me

Keeps on haunting me

There’s a ghost in my house

A ghost of your memory

A ghost of the love that was took from me

Ghost in my house…

WordPress Discover: Tempo

In April 2020, WordPress has reopened its Discover challenges.  They are essays each day of the month to get bloggers to think about what to write.  This week Krista Stevens is writing the Discover challenges.

Today’s prompt is “tempo.”  One of Krista’s suggestions for tempo is a photo that shows motion.  I looked at photos I took recently, and one I snapped December 11 last year represents motion well, I feel.

I have been contributing my time to a small local cemetery, and at the back of the cemetery, away from the avenue, is a hillside sloping down to where a creek runs.  You can see many fallen tree leaves, blurred by chance.  I think the blur is representative of the motion that the leaves made when they fell to the ground.

DEC/11/2019

There is likewise brush in the photograph, with smoke spiralling endlessly high up.  The smoke also indicates motion.

The water in the river, out of sight, itself is movement, as well.

These elements, the blurred leaves on the hill, the smoke from the fire, and the water in the background perhaps all contribute to the idea of “tempo” in the snapshot.  There isn’t a great deal of movement occurring in the photograph.  However, those visuals I’m bringing up add to a feeling of rhythm.

I wouldn’t necessarily have thought the photo would serve the purpose of showing motion or tempo, but I like how the photo turned out.  It is easy for me to assign a label like motion, or tempo, to this specific snapshot.

I must have been enjoying myself, to illustrate a moment like that in a way that has some beauty to it.  I am glad for the opportunity to show it off.

I am appreciative of the brief.

20 Problems I Have Seen and Resolved

Chasing the hobbit…turns out it’s not only a metaphor but also a real-life situation — an experience that many of us are familiar with. Over the last few months, I have encountered and solved many problems like this; some were unique and others were simply irritating. In hopes of helping someone who is currently searching for solutions to similar issues, I’ve compiled 20 of my most challenging (and gratifying) experiences into one blog post!

November 24, 2019, was Kaite’s thirty-fifth chasing the hobbit. She is happily married, to a great guy, and they have hopping careers. She has been known to help clarify life, with thoughtful Christmas contributions.

One gift was a special design, on a coffee thermos, a Maple Lawn Cemetery logo, for the cemetery for who I’m a computer monkey. She is one of our “friendlies.”

Bearing my customized canteen

https://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html

BUMP… you’re on WordPress? If you’ve hit bumps in the road, the reality that there will be problems has taught me a trick or two. I came up with a few contingencies!


For those lucky few, I have a list for you, of twenty posts, of special use, in the event of specific unforeseen circumstances. Here you are.

  1. Verbal Confirmation: Assigning a Speech Label findingenvirons1.blog/2014/10/01/verbal-confirmation-assigning-a-speech-label/
  2. Passion is Fragile findingenvirons1.blog/2016/09/16/passion-is-fragile/
  3. Action is Essential if you Want Your Aims findingenvirons1.blog/2016/10/06/action-is-essential-if-you-want-your-aims/
  4. Lofty Ambitions are Nothing But Daunting, At the Start findingenvirons1.blog/2016/11/13/lofty-ambitions-are-nothing-but-daunting-at-the-start/
  5. Thinking I Have Been Misguided findingenvirons1.blog/2017/09/04/thinking-i-have-been-misguided/
  6. Being Artificial on Social Media findingenvirons1.blog/2017/10/23/being-artificial-on-social-media/
  7. Devising Content that Stands Out from the Crowd findingenvirons1.blog/2017/11/07/devising-content-that-stands-out-from-the-crowd/
  8. Requirement To Proceed Gingerly is Essential findingenvirons1.blog/2017/11/09/requirement-to-proceed-gingerly-is-essential/
  9. Whether Sincere or Can We Challenge Ourselves findingenvirons1.blog/2017/11/18/whether-sincere-or-can-we-challenge-ourselves/
  10. Narrowing Down How People Interrelate findingenvirons1.blog/2017/12/30/narrowing-down-how-people-interrelate/
  11. Attack of the Video Content findingenvirons1.blog/2018/01/28/attack-of-the-video-content/
  12. Twitter Refreshing How the Platform Looks and Making It Easier findingenvirons1.blog/2018/04/09/twitter-refreshing-how-the-platform-looks-and-making-it-easier/
  13. Be That You Would Rather Risk Temporary Shelf Life findingenvirons1.blog/2018/05/07/be-that-you-would-rather-risk-temporary-shelf-life/
  14. How Literature Can Keep You Out of Trouble #LiteracyDay findingenvirons1.blog/2018/09/08/how-literature-can-keep-you-out-of-trouble-literacyday/
  15. 10 Freaky Reasons Cupcakes Could Get You Fired findingenvirons1.blog/2018/09/22/10-freaky-reasons-cupcakes-could-get-you-fired/
  16. Drifting Down the Inclination to Abnormal findingenvirons1.blog/2019/08/29/drifting-down-the-inclination-to-abnormal/
  17. Why Blogger’s Envy Will Make You Question Everything findingenvirons1.blog/2019/09/12/why-bloggers-envy-will-make-you-question-everything/
  18. Why A Winter’s Night Will Change Your Life findingenvirons1.blog/2019/10/04/why-a-winters-night-will-change-your-life/
  19. Why When We Are Young We Heed What We’re About findingenvirons1.blog/2019/11/05/why-when-we-are-young-we-heed-what-were-about/
  20. There is no number twenty. I am sure you can write it. This is an exercise that you have brief to appropriately respond, except if you have prepared what to do.

Trust in your arrangement. I’m glad you visited, as I have written these posts to hang out in the blogosphere these last few years. The pleasure is mine.

How a #spring ruling on Content Curations made me a better person

My younger sister wrote me this spring that she had read Dale Carnegie’s “How to Win Friends and Influence People.”  She said the book improved her interpersonal interactions at work.

One morning I started my content curation tools on the internet, and to my surprise, the designers I tool I use most often had revamped the app.

I work in a mostly volunteer capacity at a cemetery.  http://www.maplelawncemetery.org

What the app does is to find webpages for the purpose of putting content on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Looking at it after its overhaul, I saw I needed to think of keywords for content that were both honest about what I am interested in doing, and valuable to people looking at me on Facebook, and on Twitter.  The reality of whether the more fringe areas of my research were or weren’t going to fly in the face of other people squarely confronted me.

I don’t want to inadvertently confuse people.

Some of my ideas just weren’t going to work, I saw. Our Facebook page is small, but those people aren’t going to be swayed, I now believe, by where I had been putting my nose if I am being transparent.

https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited

There is an idea in business that employees don’t work for the boss, that in fact, the boss works for the employees.  I work for the people who like the page.  I don’t have the freedom to indulge every avenue I want to, if I don’t want to turn off the people I speak to, and it is probably true that new people I might possibly interest will have similar sensibilities to those who are already involved.

Boss-Employee Relationship Etiquette https://www.thespruce.com/boss-employee-relationship-etiquette-4117468

I hadn’t been aware the more fringe elements of my keyword research was a potential problem, and, without my input, a solution presented itself.

I had envisioned that I would find a strategy to make this work when the time came.  With fresh eyes, I began to see how to better use my content tools going forward.  In the process, I became, in a small way, a more honest person, at least more honest about what I am doing on social.

As the Buddhist maxim asserts: “Never lie, cheat, or steal.”  I got a little more spiritual, yesterday, you might say. It was unexpected all the same.

Maple Lawn Cemetery

On Twitter, I’m https://twitter.com/findingenvirons  

DrumUp is an app on the world wide web at https://drumup.io  

The DrumUp starter plan is inexpensive, and it offers a lot of use for someone with a business model on Facebook, Twitter, and/or LinkedIn.

Resolutions for 2019

Seeking ideas for this small blog of mine, I began last month to refer to the weekly newsletter Publishous.  Publishous is a little more than a year old, with about 5800 supporters.  The newsletter is a collection of semi-connected ideas about content and the like and includes a writing prompt.

Formerly I would refer to WordPress’ own daily prompts before that came to an end, owing, I presume, to WordPress no longer wishing to organize their once-a-day prompts.

The prompt for the current newsletter is Resolutions.  I am late because I did less work between Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

As you know, the custom among many New Year’s revelers is to identify resolutions for the coming year that mark a life change.  Resolutions can be in the spirit of fun, or they can be difficult to declare if a resolution requires the kind of change that is hard to make.

I kind of hate resolutions because I cannot think of useful ones.  I do have a few tactics ready, for better productivity in 2019.

I was inspired in 2018 to read Robert Greene’s book The 48 Laws of Power.  This book was a difficult read, but rich enough with great ideas to benefit from having read the book.  Even though 2019 was far off, I thought to resolve to make some attempt to apply the book to my strategy in the year ahead.

I was not confident that I could apply much of The 48 Laws of Power until I came across a Twitter account that helps by mentioning ideas from Greene’s book–
https://twitter.com/48tweetsofpower

I want to apply more commitment to the areas of work for which I am already present.

My digital social interactions are largely confined to Facebook and Twitter.

At the cemetery, we have been working together since 2011, and we soon thought that a page for the work we do would be useful.

Maple Lawn Cemetery, St. Catharines

On Twitter, I don’t specifically refer to details of the work I do with my dad.  Instead, I tweet a few articles, generally about tech, and some about charity and a few other concepts.  I have the idea that, if I do this, it could prove useful.

On Facebook, real “real estate” is hard to market, because of the competition among business users, to make ads which are interesting.  I wish my dad and I had a marketing budget, but we don’t.

Most of the work I do for my dad’s little business is done on a volunteer basis, and I rarely include a call-to-action that deliberately invites business (you could say I leave money on the table).  It’s just not my responsibility.

That’s all part of why I struggle with effective New Year’s resolutions.  It is frustrating to think that life improvement could be worked out without a yin and yang down-side, that depletes the benefit of strategy in business, and in life.  I want to check the work in case there is a down-side, that I am blind to, that could defeat me.

I want to blog at approximately the same pace at which the newsletter prompts are e-mailed, in Publishous.  You may wish to check it out for yourself.

The spirit of the blog is to put out an “ask” identifying that I’m interested in taking “real world” work online and also that I’m capable as a creator, to use the buzzword, to keep active in a role which for now is valuable to my dad’s business in terms of the results I effect.  I’m an optimist.


Photographer:
Jiyeon Park

Thank you for reading my post here, and good luck with your own blogging in 2019. Take care, and all the best.

Be That You Would Rather Risk Temporary Shelf Life

Laneway

November 8, 2017, I published a post the day after Twitter began to permit tweets of a length of two hundred and forty characters, rather than the traditional hundred and forty.  It was one of those days that felt to me a touch helpless, or certainly awkward, and I’m not sure I responded adequately at the time considering many people on Twitter were clearly unhappy with the decision.

That was six months ago.  The social media conundrum has certainly multiplied since then.

Today I saw a blog post, Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Objects or People Older than 50 years, that inspired me to return to the post I wrote in November and curate it.  https://ceenphotography.com/2018/04/12/cees-black-white-photo-challenge-objects-or-people-older-than-50-years/  Cee suggested in one of the posts in her composition blog that photographers try the possible technique of desaturation in a photo.

I am just beginning to have the opportunity to enjoy browsing her blog, and I haven’t applied a technique like that very much, but I did give something like that a go when I curated my post https://findingenvirons1.wordpress.com/2018/04/24/a-photo-of-harmony-do-you-agree/  I am going a stage further by reflecting on what Cee in her blog says about composition and techniques such as desaturation.

 In November I was thinking about WordPress’ Ben Huberman, who contributes essays to the WordPress photo challenges, and who wrote that bloggers should focus that week on the idea of Temporary, how it is things can be seen in the image that will no longer be there, as with autumn leaves in October.

Letting it out of the bag was a busy time.  I looked back at a photo I took Wednesday, October 15, 2014, when I was purer as a blogger, meaning not seen by as many (compared to me there are a lot of good ones).

It’s the trees shielding the cemetery and you can see the lane running behind Louth United Church.  Ben seems to be an understated champion of photography and also of blogging, with WordPress.

Where before I would have argued, if necessary, that the video capture look of the sky overhead reflected the idea of temporary all the more because everything that was in the sky had passed on, not content to be passively captured.

Now I think that desaturation in the photograph better suggests that the sight of the church is indeed temporary, where it had a congregation at one time but no longer does.  The sky overhead no longer looks so artificial and there is a hint that with time, as the church has grown very old, so too has the color of the photo faded and dispersed.

Laneway
Wednesday‎, ‎October‎ ‎15‎, ‎2014

I am a junior member of a not-for-profit that permits me some freedoms to explore possibilities with a blog, which you can see here for yourself.  We care for Maple Lawn Cemetery and we’re active on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited

Serenity at a cemetery
Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Eventually, following Twitter’s decision in November to begin its fateful change, I decided to do the free ten-day WordPress Developing Your Eye I email course, which for me meant ringing in the New Year with it, the end of December and the beginning of January.

When Twitter began to include tweets with a character length of two hundred and eighty rather than plain a hundred and forty, I was dismayed the same as the others who disagreed strongly with the corner it turned.  At the moment, I didn’t know what that would say about the future… or the past, either.

Twitter continues to prosper and while I have adjusted my strategy, I remain interested in the modicum of relevance it possesses.  You’re welcome to “like,” “follow,” and/or comment.

Brief tips for keeping up

Church at cemetery

I am updating this a year later–this is the early morning of August 12, 2018, and I published this post after curating it from something I did October 20, 2014.  I am the SMM and junior operations director for a small not-for-profit cemetery.  I have my hand in as a blogger to complement my research and social media skills.

We’re on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited

How is your content doing?  Are you keeping records?

There’s nothing intuitive about being outfitted for killer content.  It’s Internet 101.  There’s engagement and then there’s conversion.

  • Be relevant in a sprawling web environment

You won’t be able to see the horizon on the world wide web.  It goes on and on, and your time can disappear into it the way tree leaves lose their pigment and then fall.

I hope that you have a plan because goals are incredibly important.  You have an uphill battle to face already, and without clear goals for you to pursue, you are spinning your wheels and going nowhere.  I definitely wish I’d tackled it more systematically years ago.

Try challenging yourself by investigating new techniques for setting goals, and see what you can put into effect.  I realize this is advice for a beginner, but if you are new and you read this, please understand that I am doing my best to run over some basic tips that you can put into practice for yourself.

You can prioritize what you want to achieve if you put some planning into what you are about. If you have the spontaneity and creative mindset to be headstrong, I’m sure that’s ok. If you are overwhelmed, and you could be, you need to throw down some controls on what you are doing.

Church at cemetery
Louth United Church

  • Read success stories and compare them to yourself

The world wide web is cool, so don’t fret.  You do need a plan of attack.

Organize your efforts so that they resemble the kind of list in which you might write what groceries you want to buy.  It’s a start!  

Don’t dismiss the inspiration you find by learning about what people who are achievers did to get where they are today.  Above all else, there are plenty of people with good intentions to who you can reach out on your journey across the Internet.

  • Find release in a second hobby

The world wide web has a lot to offer, but you probably need a second hobby if you’re feeling troubled.  Something that you can do in the outdoors might be good, to keep your mind active on more than one front (on more than just your life computing).

Maybe you should be writing offline, to keep your engine fresh.  Reading real-world books is a good idea, especially if you can learn something from them.  That’s a concrete example of how and when doors will open for you.

Speaking of the real world, interaction outside the digital corridors of the Internet has its place for you, distinctly.  Don’t go too far afield by forgetting what’s out there physically.

Dimensions: 1920 x 1440
Photographer: Burak Kebapci

Are you struggling with your brand identity?  Leave a comment for me if you think of something I strongly need to see.  I’m curating this based on a blog post I did the twentieth of October, 2014, which rather needed an update.

I wouldn’t mind hearing of others’ efforts as you keep on descending into the backwaters of the Internet.  I know readers may be reluctant to comment, but you’re very welcome to note here where your online journey has taken you.  And if you do relate, and in fact have found help.

You can “like” and/or “follow” as well.  Thanks!