A Difficult St. Patrick’s Day

On St. Patrick’s Day, everyone is Irish.  My family is Irish, and in the town up north, where my mother’s mom grew up, and so did Cathie, she, with the help of a few other lovely people, put together over time a pretty comprehensive account of the Irish my mother’s side of the family has in them.  It is interesting, although I only have a passing familiarity with them.

    It looks like this St. Patrick’s Day, 2020, I’ll be a little less Irish.  It looks grim.

Photographer:
Tiago Almeida

    I wish a lot of things were different, but I never would have chalked up this catastrophe to something I would see in my lifetime.  I hear of environmental warnings, like that there could be, say, eight years until the damage to the planet caused by humans becomes irreversible, or that global warming will cause sea levels to rise, however active God is, on the picture at large.

    To consider attacks between warring groups the world over, hellbent on decreasing each other to iotas, to very small pieces, I think also of various police forces unfairly treating peaceable citizens, because they loathe the skin colour or some addiction that isn’t completely the fault of the party in question, for behaviour that doesn’t toe the line for the safety of the public.  I think about these now and again, yet I hadn’t thought of what really descended this spring.

    I always do my best to enjoy St. Patrick’s Day, as so many do with aplomb and style.  Here now we are called on to be, as I believe it is spelled in a phrase, not Godfearing, but socially distant.  Good on us all the same, that we would find solidarity in separating from one another, in a fashion that, like the lot of the unlucky addict, is no fault of our own.

Photographer:
Peter Hershey

    We will have to come up with new measures to survive a crisis that isn’t manmade, and we have to do it at a time when I am sure many of us in the West would be happier celebrating St. Patty’s in the usual fashion, wearing the colour green, so to speak.  We’re told to stay out of bars and restaurants and nightclubs and still young people want to.

    I want to be young myself, but not to the extent I want to risk sacrificing getting old.  I attempted to think about a superb St. Patrick’s Day I could recollect and say something regarding, and although I recall it every year, I don’t know I could say that any March festivity was better than some other.  A number of them were beautiful.

    I barely care about 1998, when I turned twenty-one years of age.  However, against how this spring is going, I don’t think the excitement of taking a visit back in time is going to especially cause me to feel better. St. Patty’s this year is sullen, even heartbreaking.

    I like to enjoy letting give a kind word at certain times, because a little kindness sprinkled liberally, while not reversing the uncertainty that we’re facing, does help temper the darkness.  I would like to wish you a happy St. Patrick’s Day, dreadful or not.

    You may be savvier to nurture your home, given the alerts about staying far off from each other, yet St. Patrick’s Day isn’t to be overlooked, obviously.  Go with the luck of the Irish!  Don’t be foolish, but don’t forget to fool, I’m saying.

Let’s have a safe spring!  You’re of course welcome to comment and to follow.  All the best to you, and your loved ones.

Best to Sell Your Elevator Pitch

When my maternal grandmother was in her golden years, she tried to assure me, “Don’t worry!”

 

It hasn’t been that bad.

 

Today’s WordPress Daily Prompt is the word, “fret,” and it’s a timely choice by the folk at WordPress.

 

What’s being outlined by writers on tech around the world in the news and elsewhere is big trouble… the Cambridge Analytics scandal dealt with Mark Zuckerberg decimated trust in Facebook and cost Zuckerberg a fortune.  For someone like me, maintaining a tiny little Facebook business page to assist with the operations and goals of our likewise tiny little nonprofit, I am sure I am characteristically flabbergasted the same as so many other people struggling to market their brand on Facebook in the same boat.

 

It is potentially back to the drawing board for many.

 

Meanwhile Twitter, beginning the twenty-third of March, put into effect a change in policy that restricts marketers from tweeting the identical thing across multiple Twitter accounts, which is less a problem for me personally as I only have one Twitter account, but which is intended to scale back the impact that spammers and the like can have if they’re active on several Twitter accounts.  For example, there is far less risk that trending topics on Twitter will be launched by the dubious and artificial method of conflated Twitter accounts bringing to prominence a devious trend.

 

It is nonsense, though, because honest Twitter users who make Twitter part of their business model have far less freedom to market their brand.  It also comes on top of several months of other changes to Twitter that consistently kept people who love Twitter up in arms, like notably extending the famed hundred and forty character limit for a tweet to twice that, two hundred and eighty characters.

 

The little tweet was suddenly full on birdsong, and now, counterintuitively, restrictions are in place so that the social noise on Twitter is slowed down considerably.

 

Dimensions: 3000 x 2143
Photographer: Mahkeo

My little blog defaults to options to share a post on both Facebook and Twitter, and now both social media giants are mired in an unpredictable morass that quiets down an outcry that until this year seemed like just a normal part of using the social media leaders.

 

Could be time to shop around.

 

Twitter finally made a quarterly profit, it is worth noting, so the changes effected under the leadership of Jack Dorsey may continue to prove effective.  For Facebook, on the other hand, the steep increase in distrust of the formerly reputable social media giant will play out a drama that will see many Facebookers transmuting their internet profiles elsewhere, or at least becoming far more aware of what can happen to data once it is committed to the Internet.

 

Dimensions: 5472 x 3648
Photographer: Flo Karr

What’s happened with Facebook is only one page in the news-intensive deconstruction of all the trouble the United States is seeing given their leadership is so unsteady at a time when a strong technology industry is necessary for friendly waters in the face of the potential for major change in the near future when many players want as much control as possible over the cyber landscape.

 

There is every reason to fret.  Above and beyond prayer, it would be advisable to equip yourself with as much information as possible to ride the tide back to shore.  It is exciting to observe, and if you have a tidy niche from which to beam the perspective you want people to take, I’d recommend you do it with dedication and surety.

 

If you’ve read today’s post, I thank you.  Any like, follow or comment is welcome.

Being Artificial on Social Media

I saw a headline on the Internet today that members of the age group Generation Z never knew days of social when it wasn’t a combination of various influencer groups.

Forging a representation of yourself for the Internet is rampantly common and has been for a long time.  When you post to Facebook, or to Twitter, or to YouTube, or to any other platform, you have an opportunity to render artificial something that is real in your life.

 This is kind of an evaluation of your everyday life experience, and in the process of translating it for the Internet, it is like aiming a throw against the palisade of the other.

Dimensions: 5821 x 3870
Photographer: Bartłomiej Jacak

When thinking of creative methods by which you translate your life onto social media, you have an ability and a freedom to craft content that is representative of you, while being artificial in format.  Your life is real, as real as you experience it, and with social, you are tapping into a real-world experience for the purpose of consumption by the other.

 

There is nothing completely real about posting on social, yet it is viewed as an offshoot of real life because you are inherently human.  Therefore the urge to render your life on social has the weight that you’re growing content out of the experience you have offline.  It wouldn’t be artificial if it were really happening.

 

AI will not justifiably imitate this process.

The urge to render your life on social media means that you grow your content out of experiences you have in real life.  You are translating your experience offline into content that the other can digest and reflect upon, to view how you are instead of he or she, between human beings.  There is no algorithm that can match this ability.

 

Social media forms content grown from life, but rendered artificial inasmuch as it is only one representation of what has happened to you in your life, the impetus of real life.

Feel free to like this post or to comment, and/or to follow if you found this post thoughtful.  I hope for you that your own social goes well and that the best moments in your life are conferred as though they were vitally important, which they are.

You are an individual and you have an opportunity to celebrate the best of what happens to you.