Why Our World Would End If A Daft Misconception Disappeared

Were the pyramids built by slaves?

No. As the Pyramids are understood by many, trembling and fearful ranks of Egyptian slave men pushed and hauled giant blocks to mark tremendous points of energy on Earth, triangle-shaped tombs for departed leaders. We can imagine slave girls in leather brassieres and skirts of bird-feather and twine, Egyptian beauties shimmering with flesh soaked by the never-shrinking sun, drunk on wine, a vision of an apparatus with no more technology than what could float a raft in the river or raise a shelter in the vast desert.

All false, and hung on a myth that keeps humans organizing themselves like a slave assembly, where all power and competence are enacted as though by the living hand of God–it is a design conceived with the Pharaohs’ tombs in the mind’s eye.

Dimensions: 6000 x 4000
Photographer: The Lazy Artist Gallery

As Ancient Egypt exerted its dominance, so too did reigning attitudes about a solidarity of people which became absolutely entrenched by the Pyramid’s sway, infiltrating the essence of the civilized world, as many understand it, an effort of many slaves.

The most earnest high school history teacher, the librarian who holds a catalog of records in disruptively accurate bookshelves, the Egyptian fantasist with his movie monster posters; all three present the mythology that the Pyramids were built with an outpouring of sweat and single-mindedness, the impossible, expansive tombs built from heavy rocks in cubes, hoisted by rope and ancient pulleys. Into the shape of three-dimensional Pyramids were constructed elaborate tombs, laid for departed Pharaohs of renown. Gizeh is the best-known.

It is the same will to organization and legacy throughout the Western world in the twenty-first century, where gentlemen in running shoes or luxury cars or perhaps dining in a capacity to manage what others might characterize as savage, to have plates and pints brought round by pleasant servers, the bosom and the heart. Gizeh’s tomb marked the first wine-and-dine.

Where will it end? As long as there are workers who are unsung, the dominion of the ancient Pharaohs will maintain its control. Update your browser.

The above is intended as an aside only. The International Day of Charity is observed annually on 5 September.

Weighing What’s Next in 2019

Dimensions: 4818 x 5346
Photographer: sasint

This month I reached two hundred followers with my WordPress blog.  I am satisfied with the achievement, and I am grateful to the people following this blog for spending the time they do.

Publishous is a newsletter reaching several thousand subscribers and counting.  I began reading it in December.

The writing’s pretty good, I agree, articles published on Medium.  Medium introduces newcomers to a few free writing selections each month.  Then, you either need to wait for the next month or to move up to a paid membership.

Soon I noticed the newsletter delivered writing prompts.

Writing for prompts feels like a shared experience.  I miss the Daily Prompts organized by WordPress.  I had thought Publishous could be a great new opportunity for quality blogging.

An example of the style of blog post I write can be found at the following link:

https://findingenvirons1.blog/2017/08

Since the last time I wrote, I received two more editions of Publishous.  I enjoy them, but I have not seen another writing prompt.  The newsletter exploded by 1500 subscribers in only several days.  Did they abandoned their prompts?  Or the prompts are not weekly, contrary to an assumption I made.

I feel like I’m getting behind.

In 2019 there are a lot of posts being written, I’ve long known.  Expert and YouTuber Neil Patel suggests quality over quantity.  He pitches one post a week or once a month.  

Neil Patel is a gentleman with an ad agency, but I don’t want to wait the span of a month between posts.

#NeilPatel #ContentMarketing #Blogging

I’ve never tried tips such as Patel’s, but they could help.  I try to think how I could deliver a better post.

If I’m fortunate, Publishous will again include a writing prompt.  I will handle it as though I am alongside great people.

I’m ending with a question, one of Patel’s tips.  Do you blog?

You’re welcome to “like” this post and/or subscribe.