How Was the 1986 Transformers Movie?

Exploring why it is worth watching after all these years, opinions about the movie from different perspectives, and The moment we finally find our hero.

I revisited the film by listening to the audio of the movie in its entirety and doing some research while I wrote this post. I also watched a couple of scenes more attentively.

  1. History of Classic Transformers

Micro Change and Diaclone, two Japanese toy lines, were the inspiration behind Transformers. They introduced robots ready to change into regular vehicles, electronic things, or weapons. Hasbro bought the Micro Change and Diaclone toys and partnered with Takara.

The TakaraTomy company makes toys in Japan. They are the maker of Transformers in Japan and plan a significant part of the design for Transformers toys.

Brand: Hasbro

Toys initially created by Takara became part of the Transformers line after being imported by Hasbro. It has been a business partnership between Hasbro and Takara ever since.

Who was the very first Transformer? Primus is the divine force of the Transformers, an ancient and ethereal being that dates back to the beginning of the universe, a force for good that exists across multiple realities, and infinite alternate universes. It was Prima who was the first Transformer created by Primus, and he would later lead Thirteen.

The Thirteen were the primary unique Cybertronians made by Primus to battle Unicron. They were each given the ranking of Prime. Simon Furman further invented the Transformers’ origin independently of Quintesson.

Quintessons are a race of creatures being driven off by Sentinel Prime. They are the manifestations of Quintus Prime and rule their realm from the planet Quintessa.

  1. Pre-1986

Tragically, the space shuttle Challenger disintegrated 73 seconds after launching, killing all seven astronauts on board. It has been suggested that those old enough to remember belong to Generation X (and are too old to be considered millennials). Would recollecting the 1986 Transformers feature also confirm that I am part of Generation X?

The animated Transformers feature film was released on the big screen in 1986. It was in North America on August 8. It was co-created by Nelson Shin, who additionally delivered the TV series.

The screenplay was composed by Ron Friedman, who made Bionic Six. 7.2/10 on IMDb, The Transformers: The Movie is a story that heroic Autobots safeguard the world from abhorrent Decepticons. Anger is raging between both factions, and that hatred has made them blind to a threat.

The Transformers: The Movie (1986) –
Theatrical Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQ96D4Q0ltE

The Transformers: The Movie is actually the first Transformers movie, even though the live-action films get all the attention. The movie gained a cult following among genre fans despite being a box office bomb.

Compared with the TV series’ equivalent 90 minutes, the film’s budget was six times higher at $6 million.

  1. 1986 Film Underdog Autobots

In The Transformers: The Movie, after a Decepticon assault devastates Autobot City, Optimus Prime wins a deadly one-on-one duel with Megatron, but ultimately sustains fatal injuries in the encounter. It was Megatron’s correct calculation that the Decepticon crew would not set off the automated defences of Autobot City.



Pinterest

I’ve thought about how the story for The Transformers: The Movie fits a quest pattern. It could be viewed like this.

Initiation–The Decepticons have conquered Cybertron, the home planet of the Transformers, in what was a year in the future, 2005. Thundercracker, Skywarp, Shrapnel, Kickback, Bombshell, and Megatron are jettisoned to conserve fuel, by several Decepticons led by Starscream.

The injured Decepticons are found by Unicron, a conscious planet that consumes different universes. (One cinematic allusion to Star Wars.)



Wikipedia

In exchange for the destruction of the Matrix–which Megatron knows can destroy him–Unicron offers him a new body. He tells him Ultra Magnus has it.

Instruction–On his deathbed, Optimus passes its power.

Journey– Retaking the Decepticons, Galvatron drives to search out Ultra Magnus at Autobot City.

Confrontation–The Autobots and Junkions fly to Cybertron. The Autobots crash their spaceship through Unicron’s eye and become disbanded. Dinobots, Decepticons, and Junkions continue to battle Unicron.

As Daniel safeguards his dad Spike from Unicron’s framework, the gathering salvages bee, Jazz, and Cliffjumper.

Conquest–During the battle, Galvatron acquires the high ground. Understanding this is Autobot’s breaking point, the work changes Rodimus Prime, the Autobot pioneer. He is an Autobot champion.

Return–Rodimus throws Galvatron into space to obliterate Unicron, then escapes with the other Autobots.

Transformation–With the Decepticons in chaos, the Autobots praise the conflict and the retaking of their home planet while Unicron’s cut-off head circles.

  1. Screenplay Resolution

During the conquest, Galvatron acquires high ground. (Remind you of Ewan McGregor’s dialogue in Revenge of the Sith?)

The Matrix, realizing this is the Autobots’ darkest hour, transforms Hot Rod into Rodimus Prime. According to Hot Rod’s tech specs, he is an Autobot Cavalier, while Rodimus Prime is an “Autobot Protector” – unlike Optimus Prime, “Autobot Commander”. While Unicron’s severed head orbits Cybertron, the Autobots celebrate the war’s end and the retaking of Cybertron from the Decepticons.

As a screenplay, I find the action and story adequate, and I also think the voice acting is notable. It mostly deserves the 7.2 it has on IMDb, although that score is possibly a little generous.

  1. Impact on pop culture

When Michael Bay made Transformers into a live-action feature, in 2007, I went on my own to the cinema, at the mall, to watch the film. I was glad to get a chance to enjoy it. Even those who don’t like the movie suggest the brand benefited from the film overall.

JoBlo on YouTube raises the question of how Megan Fox seems since she both made it in Hollywood as the leading actress in Transformers and since she met Machine Gun Kelly.

I agree that Michael Bay is a great action-film director, whatever criticism is levelled at him, and his first Transformers film shows it. Shia LaBeouf plays the leading role in the movie quite admirably, and Megan Fox is gorgeous and fun as the film’s leading actress. Bay had a $147 million budget in the US for the movie and the box office was $4.8 billion.

Sadly, notwithstanding posting Autobot-sized numbers that followed – Fallen ($836M), Moon ($1.12B), Eradication ($1.1B), The Last Knight ($605M) – the films tumbled off a precipice, and while he delighted in making them, he ought to tap out sooner.

Despite many calling the second movie the worst of the franchise, Reddit user chris95rx7500 claims it is still his favourite. Furthermore, “if you didn’t like the movie, the toy line made up for it.”

Will Spielberg receive another Academy Award in 2023?

Shia LaBeouf made his Hollywood breakthrough with Transformers after having starred in smaller projects. Fans of Transformers tend to view them as relatively disposable since there are so many movies. Originally, the sixth film in the flagship series and the seventh overall were set for release on June 9, 2023 – but that date remains.

Thank you for visiting. You’re welcome to say you “like” this post, follow my blog and leave a comment.

The History of the Movies #WordPrompt

This month’s WordPrompt features the word BRIDGE. In an email from WordPress the morning of March 9, the first thing I did was start to consider using the WordPrompt inspiration as a jumping-off point for a new blog post.

What’s the Word: Introducing the Monthly WordPrompt

When I was learning how to make blogging a hobby, I took part in a few free courses. WordPress provided me with a ten-day photography course to get me out the door (and onto the “blog”) with some beginning training as a photographer.

Looking for other resources, I found the now-retired writer and educator Jeff Goins, from Nashville, Tennessee, best known for his bestseller The Art of Work, which I have read twice, also led me through an introduction as to how to write a blog, some years ago, through the free portion of his training courses, on Facebook. Mr. Goins is great and you can find his blog at https://goinswriter.com/blog/

Nowadays, building a bridge is not an expensive activity. Some towns are doing it to transform the pedestrian experience in their communities and to bring back some charm to the old traditional ways of living. By installing a pedestrian bridge, nearby areas will become more accessible and in turn boost local business as well.

A beautiful bridge crosses the Welland Canal very near to my parent’s home. There is a parking lot to sit in your car and watch ships pass, and walking and rollerskating and hiking trails run to and fro, very nice. It is not really for pedestrians, although you can go on foot if you feel what’s out there is worth walking to.

The road runs out of town in the direction across the bridge. The hiking trails run along the outskirts.

I want, for this post, to go back twenty-five years, to recall some excellent films. All these films pointedly affected me.

The Coen brothers’ 1987 film Raising Arizona is a favourite comedy. Lovers played by Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter pine for a baby of their own, though are unable to conceive. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AIfVoGUs6c

Finally, Cage, desperate to make his beloved wife happy, kidnaps a baby to raise him as their own. Despite the bad taste of the plot, it is a very funny caper film and does have a happy, if ambiguous, ending to all the trouble. The evil presence of the monstrous biker, having pledged his help to the infant’s real father, kind of transforms Cage’s view of criminality and helps him see that wrongdoing is not a loving way.

In 1988 audiences got the mind-blowing film Die Hard, where Bruce Willis plays a shameless cop who becomes caught in a high-level burglary in L.A. at Christmas time. The stakes are high for Willis’ character and the action is exciting and fast-paced.

Tim Burton’s 1989 film Batman redefined how a movie could introduce a superhero on the silver screen, especially at a time when previous versions of the character were beginning to be forgotten and new themes for the character were being introduced in the pages of comics. Tim Burton’s Batman was not only a superhero adaptation for the big screen but also incorporated elements that had never previously been attempted (or even dreamed of).

The nineteen nineties were set to be an excellent decade for film. With Jaws in 1975, Star Wars in 1977 and Superman in 1978, the tradition of the summer blockbuster event film had been established; the warnings that film was a doomed industry were unfounded. In 1992 Robert Altman brought to the screen a scathing indictment of Hollywood politics; Altman had previously been well known for directing MASH, the Korean War comedy.

Altman’s The Player was the story of a struggling screenwriter, played by Vincent D’Onofrio, keen on making his film a reality; the film executive who might give him his chance becomes so incensed by the trouble writer’s persistence that a lone encounter ends with manslaughter. The rest of the film is about the studio exec’s insistence on escaping justice, and while these are spoilers it is to be noted that the corruption about the murder is so pronounced that it translates to the meta in a break from reality. The Player is a very meta piece of work.

Another favourite movie of 1992 is Quentin Tarantino’s debut Reservoir Dogs, a story of a diamond theft woefully gone wrong. Acting wonderfully, Harvey Keitel keeps the film gripping for the audience. In the following years, it’s clear that Tarantino proved to be another visionary Hollywood auteur.

1993 saw the entire film industry mature when Steven Spielberg brought Richard Crichton’s sci-fi novel Jurassic Park to the screen in a massively successful undertaking that brought CGI in the film to a whole new ballpark. Beyond the visual spectacle are other nice touches in a special film; points of dialogue, often given to Jeff Goldblum, lend philosophical beats to the movie that remain relevant today. The theme of Jurassic Park is that people’s greed cannot be subdued when they are tempted.

The pop hit of 1994, Trainspotting, based on the Scotsman Irvine Welsh’s novel, shows the lives of drug addicts whose only allies are their small pack of anti-social but occasionally intellectual nonconformists. Great movie with not much CGI, but great music and outsider philosophy that is hard to match.

Another outsider film, a tiny film in 1994, Clerks is directed by Jersey’s Kevin Smith and features an unknown cast shot in grainy black and white, giving a voice to frustrations among convenience store characters who carry the talky little thing that Smith would prove in the career ahead of him he would never leave behind.

The Truman Show in 1998 stars Canadian comic Jim Carrey as a naive salesman who wishes passionately to leave his hometown, to give chase to a mysterious girl who once flirted with him in high school. His wife, his mother, his best friend all reject the idea. Adding to the complexity of Carrey’s character, he misses his father dearly, who drowned in a dramatic storm. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ne-DzDN7WDw

Alan Ball directed American Beauty in 1999, a scathing satire of the upper class that is reminiscent of some of the best satires of the 1970s, such as Chinatown and Network. The film American Beauty asks questions about art; it takes the American Dream to task, with confusion among its seasoned male characters living successful family man lives.

Another great film from 1999 is The Blair Witch Project, a frightening horror film that broke box office records left and right and was the least expensive investment in Hollywood history that turned out to be the most successful. Internet marketing helped add to the intrigue in 1999 by linking the found footage filmmaking style to a website that helped make the events of the film appear real. I am pretty sure that The Blair Witch Project is the first found-footage horror picture.

In 1999, another excellent movie was Fight Club, in which Edward Norton’s character unravels and reassemblies his psychological make-up and values based on a chance encounter with Brad Pitt. Great music.

A fourth important film from 1999 is The Matrix. Neo, a computer programmer played by Keanu Reeves, finds out truths about a simulation that controls the world and slowly accepts that he is a hero for it.

SLC Punk in 2001 brought arthouse outsider sensibilities to the story of an American punk asshole who would claim to be a punk rocker while still pursuing the avenues opened to him by his hardworking parents. Good music here, too.

In 2002 The Bourne Identity stars Matt Damon as a U.S. spy with no memory of who he truly is. A realistically minimal style of narrative where plot and dialogue are concise and effective help make this film just great! No one dreamed it would be such an influential hit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpKaB5dvQ4g

By making Bourne Identity’s scripted ending seem insensitive, the events of September 11, 2001, complicated creative decisions about its conclusion, the director determined.

Kill Bill Vol. 1 in 2003 and Kill Bill Vol. 2 in 2004, both directed by Quentin Tarantino, proved that the best martial arts films in screen history could now come within from the USA; a new tradition.

The Terminal, a 2005 film starring Tom Hanks as an immigrant living in an airline terminal, until his immigration issues can be resolved, is a terrific movie. Hank’s efforts to be guilelessly cool work well and there is quite a bit of observational satire about social acceptance.

Another film that was strong in 2005 was Transformers, based on the Hasbro toys of the 1980s that represent advanced cars and trucks that transform into robots. Megan Fox delivers a strong and visually sophisticated performance as the female lead. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3t3TedG-ovs&vl=en

Note: this video, while using footage from earlier films in the franchise, is mostly discussing the upcoming Transformers 7.

In 2006, Daniel Craig starred as James Bond 007 in Casino Royale, which was the last film adaptation of Ian Fleming’s James Bond novels after decades of James Bond movies. Craig did a good job as his performance helped bring a flashy but lightweight, though beloved, film franchise, into a new universe for 007, that saw that what was going on was dark and dirty.

The Coen brothers’ No Country for Old Men in 2007 is stellar, where a lucky cowboy does his best to steal a small fortune in drug money after he comes across a shoutout where no one has survived. The villain in this film is a frightening characterization.

The 2007 action film Live Free or Die Hard is a sequel to 1988’s Die Hard, and even has Bruce Willis and Kevin Smith together for a scene. Unusual that a greying lead actor can return to continue to do a stunt-heavy film would become more and more acceptable for cinema audiences who enjoy the USA style of filmmaking.

A few years later, in 2015, the promotional work by the Walt Disney Corporation for Star Wars Episode VII The Force Awakens made me glad that I had Star Wars toys as a kid. I even had an R2-D2 light switch cover that would turn off the light when I needed to rest. I had workbooks, which is a little unfair to the other students, that helped teach me to put words together on the page through the lens of a world filled with Star Wars.

I had a lot of action figures that were likenesses of characters and vehicles from the Original Trilogy, and, in nice weather, I could play with them in the backyard of my house. In 2015 some of that fun reemerged unexpectedly when Disney and Lucasfilm revealed that J. J. Abrams would direct a brand new Star Wars film. Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill even returned for the new titles.

In 2017, Rogue One A Star Wars Story also provided a new backstory to the classic sci-fi Star Wars from 1977.

The 2019 film Joker is a standout about an anti-social outsider who wishes for nothing more than both sanity in his mind and the city around him, and who chooses between fame as a comedian or joining the criminal faction of the city of Gotham. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2ZIMeqgZ6E

Why Mom Was Right About Facebook’s Allures

If the subject of Facebook enters the conversation, my mom likes to say she isn’t on it.

That doesn’t mean there isn’t a Facebook account in my dad’s name, and I think my mother also thinks that the two of them, my mom and my dad, have the same outlook, and disposition.  By that logic, I take it that an account apiece isn’t necessary for them.  Comments they leave are usually attributed to one or the other.

Photo by Wilfred Iven on StockSnap

I have a small Facebook account.  But despite having a humble reverence for the David Fincher-directed 2010 film The Social Network, my pleasure in being on Facebook is helping to run a not-for-profit business.  For example, this very morning, a woman let me know, with an email to the Facebook page for the business, that she finds the business very beautiful, and you’ll understand why in a moment.

In 2007, at the sales company where I worked, Facebook on the desktop computers was blocked, so that entrance-level employee couldn’t enjoy it.  At that time, even for a young man like me, Facebook was a lifeline.  In 2012, Facebook App Center, an internet-based portable store, was carried out onto the market.

The store at first had 500 Facebook applications. which were. for the most part, games.  I remember wondering why was this happening.  Why were so many users playing games?

Around this time, my dad did kind of a noble thing, when, after years of helping manage the municipal cemetery for his job, he came across a little cemetery on the other side of town.  Their trustees were hoping to share the burial ground with the district he had worked for.

My father acquired the cemetery and welcomed me on as a partner in 2012.  For a nonprofit, as a retiree might characteristically enjoy working at, presently we require one day a week, ordinarily.

Louth United Church

I am not sure I suggested it myself, but it was probably me who did–making a business page on Facebook for the cemetery, so interested people could easily get ahold of us, like the woman did this morning.  My dad had wanted a website for the cemetery, and this extra measure was one more step, a Facebook page

https://www.maplelawncemetery.org/24701.html

https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited/

I compose posts that flow data about characteristic concerns we have.  You see, I research and blog.  I am an amateur writer.

I’ve composed a few brief tales, however, I don’t have the standard novel or screenplay that an essayist frequently has.  I’m really an amateur blogger with family business ties.  The business page on Facebook has nearly a hundred accounts of people who “like” it, and most of the control of the page falls to me.

One friend of the business, an elderly lady, I got to know a little during her brief visits to the cemetery, and also when the two of us interacted together on Facebook, had advice for me that I continue to apply on the Facebook business page.

My mother may never have signed up for Facebook, but I think she is pleased to think I show the initiative to manage the page.  My mom worked for a small business for many years, as a clerk.  We actually argue about many matters, but as long as I show a commitment to my dad’s retirement business, I continue to hold some cards in the game, between the three of us.

Nowadays Facebook has a significant draw, yet what we would never have expected are the losses Facebook has had to confront.  Remember the lead-up to the appointment of 2016, when it was discovered that Facebook was utilizing Cambridge Analytica?  That information firm gave Hillary Clinton a benefit, as her position was greater for Facebook than Donald Trump’s pass into the White House would have been.

Photo by Sticker Mule on StockSnap

It was trouble.  Trump’s since been banned from Facebook, as well as from other social media.  Granted, Maple Lawn Cemetery’s a small page, and we don’t handle cash transactions there, so the Cambridge Analytica scandal didn’t impact us much, although the distrust in the air that grew for Zuckerberg did have a toxic impact on how people used Facebook, compared to how they used it before the 2016 scandal.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/12/facebook-whistleblower-behind-major-leak-is-going-to-testify-in-europe.html

Two days ago, in the early hours, CNET Tech, when reporting on Facebook going against the British Parliament, discussed online one Damian Collins, a member of parliament.  Even now, Frances Haugen, CNET reports, is preparing to speak to British Parliament.  It was Collins who took Cambridge Analytica to task in 2016, across the pond, and he is quoted as saying, “There needs to be greater transparency on the decisions companies like Facebook take when they trade off user safety for user engagement.”

The issue is that Facebook utilizes information about its customers to maneuver them to invest more energy, again became a national topic Sunday when Frances Haugen, a former Facebook worker, showed up on TV to clarify that Facebook is investigating strategies for better compelling and ultimately how to benefit from kids helpless against Facebook fixation.

Facebook has been successful this week demonstrating to the European Union that Facebook has adequate privacy protections in place, but they remain dodgy.  Frances Haugen did them no favours, however.

You know, I don’t think my mother thinks about those kinds of things.

My mom has the perception that people are talking to each other when they are posting on Facebook.  You can say that’s true, however, I think she sees those individuals “talking” rather than the more accurate description that anyone, when Facebook posts are public, can cooperate with those posts.  The explanation for this is those messages from Facebook, about those individuals that you have been cooperating with, is not that those individuals posting have chosen companions to send messages to (ie my mom, I suppose).

What I mean is that when my mother is happy to leave a comment on a post, say, composed by a cousin of hers or by an aunt, with my dad’s account, the reason emails from Facebook come back to him with reminders is that my mother has initiated contact, with his account, with those family members, it is not because those family members want emails sent to him and to her (my mom and dad).

The drawback I personally have run into on Facebook is that I have that one friend who reacts to lots of the posts I do put up.  He’s bizarre.  I know there’s a cliched perception that if your mother is reading what you are posting on Facebook, you are dealing with trouble, but to that end I don’t remember too many times that the account that my mom and dad use came back with reactions to my posts.

My mom is good that way.  Lots of times, I am dropping posts with little to no engagement, although I have an idea what works to at least merit a little bit of a reaction.

Photo by Lenharth Systems on StockSnap

Many people prescribing what’s called a dopamine detox suggest staying off social media.  Sometimes they say they never felt better after getting away from Facebook for a while (better, or clearer-headed).

I don’t think my mom ever felt Facebook was a problem among me and my brother and my sister.  We aren’t children.

My mom doesn’t like me eating too much junk food, but she doesn’t raise objections to too much Facebook use.  It just isn’t that Facebook is the problem its detractors say it is.

I doubt that Zuckerberg is the disrupter that Jesse Eisenberg plays him as in the David Fincher film.  That really is great cinema.  The brilliance of the ambiguity of the conclusion of the film leaves you with the knowledge of how the film’s events next played out in the real world and leaves the audience to ask an existential question, about the value of what Zuckerberg has done.

Jessie Eisenberg as Mark Zuckerberg is the Nietzschean overman who makes a brave journey, a very satisfying ideology.  I find Facebook pleasant and harmless.  Occasionally if I come on too strong, for a stranger’s liking, I get rebuked, but usually, I pick safe moves that don’t rock the boat too much.  

The Social Network

Compared to both Facebook and Instagram, where the drawbacks are becoming ugly to discuss, I retain an optimistic view of Twitter, and I respect the measures Jack Dorsey has implemented to deal with hate speech, which while known to be a problem on Twitter, doesn’t engender the same conversation that I know of that it does about Facebook.  Twitter is actually getting so it can conceivably warn you if you are writing an incendiary tweet.  It is a changing attitude for the service, for sure.

About Facebook, people say things like hate content will earn more views and that is probably true, although I don’t know why.  Facebook is being blamed for allowing this.  I think that a person can be more attractive if they aren’t focused on material that is hateful.

A spiritual outlook is better, I think, say, like to believe that there is good in everyone, if it is only nurtured.  Hate is a terrible quality to define a person by.  There is vast beauty in the world, and to spend your time on Earth consumed by hatred is not a fine way to live life.

When I was a little kid, my mother would say the cliché, “If your friends jumped off a bridge, would you do the same?”  It’s not quite the same thing, as my mom doesn’t think there’s anything wrong with Facebook.  I don’t, really, either, despite the Cambridge Analytica scandal in 2016, and now the Frances Haugen 60 Minutes debacle.

Perhaps those people with whom my mom chats on Facebook, though they may understand Facebook better than my mother does, do like having comments from her, and like having their posts viewed.  That my mother can mentally translate Facebook use into a “chat” that is organic in the sense that people are having a catch-up lets me know that there are probably many people who view Facebook, and Facebook Messenger, the same as that.

The mental concept of Facebook automatically translates into a natural style of conversation instead of being too robotic, which is old hat for anybody who can remember the days that Internet chat was a chief part of the Internet’s function, whether that was AOL or MSN Messenger, or, these days, Facebook Messenger.

Perhaps my participation in services like MSN Messenger back in the day helped elucidate for my mother how it is that Internet chat goes, but it is more likely that talk with my sister Kaite is what educated my mother into an understanding of Internet chat, as Kaite thinks of herself as an early adopter of Facebook.

Like a feedback loop, my sister’s instruction to my mother brought round for me insight into how people view Facebook and Facebook Messenger.  Other people must have similar reactions when they are becoming familiar with it.  While I would have understood it regularly given my experience on MSN Messenger as everybody had in the 2000s, I too feel that I am right as rain about how it is to be on Facebook, but not at the expense of how I feel it is to be part of a community inside Facebook.

The problem is the question of whether Facebook will keep a good enough reputation for itself among most Internet users around the world.  Though my mom’s understanding of Facebook is probably largely due to my sister’s help, I think my mom is right that she sees the use of Facebook in a simple but useful light.  None of that would be going on without my sister’s words of explanation for my mother and father.

I should remember that when I am writing emails to Kaite.  Respect due, Kaite is married and has a little one at home, and has been working in the city of London, England, where their family resides.

My mom may discourage junk food, but Facebook is right by her.  I remember my high school librarian who referred to many works of fiction as being “ice cream reading,” meaning they weren’t high-value books.  Funny how that is.

Photo by Matt Moloney on StockSnap

You’re welcome to like this post, follow my blog, and leave comments.  All the best, especially if you are on Facebook.  If you want to contact me by email, you can, at the personal email patrickcoholan@hotmail.com

My personal Facebook account is https://www.facebook.com/findingenvirons  Don’t think you can be affected?  Give it a go. I hope you have a great Halloween this season.

Boldness of The Skywalker Saga: Where’d You Go?

Dedicated to a love of Star Wars, Celebration this month in Chicago flabbergasted fans.  The assembly included panel discussions and all manner of Star Wars exhibits, and also celebrity appearances, a teaser for Episode IX, along with trailers for EA’s game Jedi:  Fallen Order, The Clone Wars S7, and The Mandalorian.  The celebration also took a look back at The Phantom Menace, embracing the sci-fi franchise once again.


StarWars.com

I took in some of it owing to its availability on YouTube.  Celebration, I recall, is nine years in the running, and in 2019 it highlights Episode IX.  Celebration revealed the title of Episode IX, and a teaser trailer.  There is excitement in the business sector of the entertainment industry, being the introduction of Disney+.  Disney+ is making available animated features from Disney’s history of films, along with Marvel Cinema Universe titles from the last ten or eleven years, and the Star Wars films, of which by now there are several.

The reason I enjoy Star Wars is that when J. J. Abrams directed The Force Awakens, I felt the excitement that Star Wars was again back speaking to me.  It seemed to again be a film series to be passionate about.

The response following Celebration did not completely line up with the positive outlook of the fortunate people who went to Celebration in person.  While most everybody there loved what’s going on, some of the YouTube channels who discuss Star Wars have mixed feelings, to say the least.  Geeks + Gamers criticized the teaser for Episode IX, The Quartering was dismissive, and a union of voices on the Internet ridiculed reactions that were exuberantly emotional.  All that is best measured against the outpouring of support for the franchise.

It is almost as if there is a guilty conscience about being part of the Fandom Menace and hating The Last Jedi, but still wanting to see what Episode IX is about.  I am sure the average fan does not feel this way.  I waited for The Last Jedi to go to Netflix, but I enjoyed it.


Photographer:
Tim Mossholder

The influence of Star Wars is hard to comprehend, but there is a war indeed between the feelings a fan has for Star Wars in the nineteen seventies and eighties, and equivalent satisfaction with the new trilogy, however much it taps into your experience of Star Wars and however deep it runs within you that the original films were perfect.

Rian Johnson directed The Last Jedi, and while that film was a commercial success, the popular response to the movie, as, for example, those voices on the Internet made known on Rotten Tomatoes, divided the fans.

None of this will be settled until December, but there will be a lot of excitement that grows this summer and fall.  As is typical of hot takes, animosities, apprehension, and outrage for Star Wars will be evident in the backlash that is going, “to battle,” for whatever reasons.

Publishous this month presented the Where’d You Go writing prompt.  Publishous is an 11,000-strong Medium newsletter which presents and highlights Christian writers who seek to make it, in the sense that they are writing because of the compulsion they feel to do so.  Although I’m not a member of Publishous, I look over articles they present, which provide some inspiration to blog in light of their writing prompts.

I am also a volunteer at a cemetery, Maple Lawn Cemetery, and I am their SMM.  You can find out more about us here: http://www.maplelawncemetery.org

Thank you, and please feel welcome to “like,” “follow,” and/or comment.  All the best.

Passionate Ice; A Boy Desiring What Others Did Not So Much

Bruce Wayne decided as a boy that he would honour the memory of his mother and father by inventing himself as Batman and challenging many criminals in Gotham City.

I watched Justice League when it went to Netflix this month and I enjoyed it. The camaraderie between the members of the Justice League comes off as solid and the plot of the film is enjoyable. It is curious to see Superman return to life.

Some of the cool moments from my life were opportunities to see films, in movie theaters.  In 1989, cinema fans filled movie houses to see the DC superhero Batman on the silver screen.

Dimensions: 5213 x 3580
Photographer: Bruce Mars

I had a good time.  Actor Michael Keaton’s role as Bruce Wayne, with its heroism, detachment from wealth, and indifference to romance makes the character of Batman a reinvention.  I suppose Keaton was a surprise star turn, and the subplot of Gotham City TV news anchors unable to appear beautiful on television, owing to poison in beauty products deliverered by The Joker, is clever.

Jack Napier’s transition to The Joker is memorable.  In other scenes from Batman, Billy Dee Williams of Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back and subsequently in Star Wars: Return of the Jedi, appears as Harvey Dent.

The climactic confrontation of the film, at the Gotham City parade beneath a cathedral with the height of a skyscraper, is wonderful.

Dimensions: 3059 x 2175
Photographer: Yi Ling Tan

When the creepy little video store in the shopping plaza near my home began renting to customers Batman, the store displayed tapes of the film like a phenomenon.  Shelf after shelf were full of the Batman video.  The format was VHS, the cassette for running a film with a VHS player.

I’d been to see it, but I wanted that VHS.  Christmas came, and family placed hand-wrapped videotape-shaped objects under the holiday tree.

They were VHS tapes, but what titles were they?  Us kids wouldn’t know until Christmas morning.  At the appointed time, I opened mine, and to my delight, the tape inside was Batman.

As the family opened our presents, a second tape of Batman under the Christmas tree emerged.  My mother’s brother and his wife had arranged for the gift of the movie Batman as well.  Two VHS tapes of the same film–a double.

What did my dear mother decide, you might ask?  This was a bummer.  She would quietly return a copy of the film to its retail store.

As a twelve-year-old, the price of a brand-new edition of a blockbuster film must be extravagant, I reasoned.  The VHS copy of Batman we had would belong to us all.

I suppose that taught me a lesson, like not to count your chickens before they hatch.  It was as if my uncle and aunt had felt I deserved my own copy of Batman, and Santa Claus did not.  The VHS tape of Batman was a gift, what I wanted and what I was losing.

In 1989, fate unfolded for Batman mobster Jack Napier.  The criminal mastermind falls into a vat of burning acid.  He loses the pigment of his skin and becomes molded with a permanent smile on his face.

I hadn’t earned my own copy of Batman, and I suppose the real lesson was that I should share.  It is a state of becoming tantalized by the promise of something gold and being humbled by the requirement to give it up.  Maybe we didn’t know that doubles of the Batman film were under the tree, but no contingency plan was in place.

I was cheesed.

Batman fans typically embrace the trilogy of Batman movies years later directed by Christopher Nolan, but I didn’t get interested in them.

You’re welcome to like, comment, or follow if my recollection of dealing with a hot trendy thing like the above resonates with you.

15 Ways the Most Youthful Adherent to Video Research is Totally Overrated. Part II

I’d been focusing when I could on five more ways you can dispense with some of the time you’re putting into video research.  If you do anything like that and if you think of consuming video content as being video research, then increasingly I don’t think there’s a consensus that anything like video research is useful.
I’m looking back in time when there were different attitudes to video.  I mean that it wasn’t as accessible as it today.  It occurs to me I should argue that if you are committed to any research activity utilizing video, and there’s a ready workaround, you should concentrate on the workaround.

Published on Nov 21, 2018
Free speech in Canada died today https://bit.ly/2BEP6cW

Photographer:
Rawpixel.com
Aerial view of black board with the letter forming hello greeting concept
  1. The first part for this post, about chasing an adherent to research, left off with points how you can turn some of your conclusions into blog posts.  Or if you don’t have a blog, there’s somewhere you could start.  I would like to make the point that the best conclusions you can form from watching a lot of videos can indeed be put somewhere, like in a blog, or a podcast, etc.  For example, on Patrick Bet-David’s Valutainment on the internet, I watched Bet-David and Robert Greene discuss Greene’s latest bestseller.
    Bet-David pointed out that Greene sat down with three hundred books to write his latest book, for the pay-off.  That’s the traditional sense of research that I don’t think you should disregard in any way.  There is no way that you can eliminate the process of reading the page, or perhaps your Kindle, from the actual work of doing research.  Sad but true.
  2. The traditional sense of video is taking a video camera to a wedding and then selling it to the wedding party.  The best research you can cultivate from a video of that kind is whether a particular family member was in attendance, or perhaps how the bridesmaids looked when they were standing side by side.
    Do you see many wedding videos, apart from celebrity weddings, that make it onto the Internet?  I am not sure there are, particularly as the advent of the handheld video camera has given way to the smartphone camera.
    If you are a young person reading this, and you don’t relate to the idea of a videographer at a wedding, it isn’t that different from a professional photographer taking pictures.  It is just that the videographer mingles with the wedding party and gets a little movie of the wedding.
  3. I’m writing there about commercial consumer video, not expensive TV productions.  The thing about the video you watch is that when it is a pricey production, I don’t think you can count on it for insight.  Particularly when focusing on video production for TV, in the nineteen sixties, seventies, and eighties, when the technology was useful enough to shoot material for television, and before computers were beginning to infiltrate it, there just wasn’t a lot of purely informative video.  The novelty on being on video overshadowed a requirement, to be honest.  As soon as the camera was recording, everybody was immediately acting at all times.
    That sounds like a polarized argument, but ninety-nine percent of the time if you were being paid to appear on camera, you were acting to do it.  Speaking jovially, you had to nail it.
  4. What happened in the mid-nineteen-eighties?  Computer effects were beginning to be integrated into more and more of the ready video, which starts to become interesting for the possibility that more and better information could be communicated by video.  With more information is born the reality that better information begins to come across.  Purists might disagree, but fast-forward fifteen years and amateur video is not only more accessible but could also be edited on par with the best of people in the trade in previous decades.
    There had been an explosion of video on cable TV which meant more ways to deliver information by video.  Did that mean you could derive better conclusions in the sense that by better I mean better located in reality?  I think so.
    You always want the past back, once you’re past a certain age, but there is some logic, or I am doing my best to apply logic here.
  5. The apparent irony is that the development of the computer industry accelerated at a much faster pace than did the growth of video.  I’m tempted once more to stop, but it’s true that by the time video was in its golden years, the computer industry was spritely, pardon the pun, spritely and skyrocketing for many, many people.  I don’t want to mislead you unfairly, but surely some blame for some of the big, really bad troubles that have hit people where there is free access to information lies with what’s just bad information.
    That caution gets sounded frequently, and where before I was tempted to stop then and there, now I really am going to stop.

I have promised one more post on the subject, with five remaining ways you might want to dodge video.  You’re welcome to like, comment, and/or follow.


Photographer:
Sticker Mule

I am humbled by the attention I receive and I shall make some effort to reciprocate interest if I am lucky enough to make a tiny ripple in this pond.
We need to go back to the future

supermarket
November 26, 2018

Discovering the Man of Steel #DiscoverWP

Warner Bros. Picture - © 2013 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. and Legendary Pictures Funding, LLC Â

May 13, 2018

The Internet bid RIP to Margot Kidder, the sixty-nine-year-old actress who was Lois Lane for the seventies and eighties’ Superman films.  For 1978’s film Superman, Kidder played Lois Lane near perfectly.

 

I have also watched a few random episodes of Krypton, the prequel TV series for the Superman universe.  The design is quite appealing and the ideas are complex but interesting.

While there are no more new Discover Challenges for WordPress, I wanted to update this post for clarity.

 

In March I borrowed a box of comic books belonging to a cousin and reflected a touch on those stories that I remembered.  It got me catching up on the Innerspace sci-fi news series on Space on cable TV.  Reflecting on their launch of the Superman origins series Krypton, one of the hosts of Innerspace in an episode from earlier this winter reflected briefly but pointedly that Man of Steel is a bad movie.

I take it Man of Steel is regarded many times as such and to counter the perception that it isn’t a good retelling of the thousands of Superman comics available in print, I want to include here from Jun 2, 2014, Exploring Man of Steel on YouTube TWITTER ► https://goo.gl/koijhV which is a go-to for a review in detail about a maligned film.

Warner Bros. Picture - © 2013 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. and Legendary Pictures Funding, LLC Â
Henry Cavill in Man of Steel (2013)

It is now known that Henry Cavill will no longer appear in the film role of Superman.  You can hear thoughts on Man of Steel in a brief discussion piece about Superman and the rest of the DC Comics Universe.  Henry Cavill Leaves Superman

I have also become aware of the Geeks + Gamers YouTube channel, and I am including here their challenge of the effectiveness of Man of Steel as a Superman film and how the channel doesn’t even believe, at the time of upload, that Henry Cavill is through as Superman.  It’s against the grain.  HENRY CAVILL OUT AS SUPERMAN? THE DCEU IS DEAD TWITTER – https://twitter.com/GeeksGamersCom

My thoughts on the conventional wisdom of Man of Steel are presented here.

This week’s WordPress Discover Challenge presents the trial of posting a different point of view than what other people have, whatever POV. This appealed to me because I thought of Superman, as a matter of fact, from the films of the nineteen seventies and eighties about the beloved comic book character, and also from the 2013 film Man of Steel, which is what specifically I have a different interpretation to write about than the casual interpretation it often gets otherwise (a great superhero film).

On Christmas Eve last year, December 24 of 2016, late in the afternoon my younger brother and his son went with me to my parent’s house for dinner and the Christmas tree. My brother let me know that the two had been in the middle of complaining about Superman, in the movies, and I was surprised that they have this opinion, which is not the same opinion I have. We’re very different people from one another.

Man of Steel presents the Superman character as an alien, which I know he is, as in the story of his life told in the 1978 film about him (titled Superman, naturally). However, whereas in that film Superman is a very human character, who blends in with his peers quite easily, in Man of Steel (2013) Superman is almost an alien monster, considering that while he looks human, he has the mentality of an outsider. This is clear, for example, when he only takes his job as a reporter for the Daily Planet at the conclusion of the film (spoiler), which is unlike Superman (1978), in which his entire time in Metropolis is spent in the alter ego of Clark Kent, a reporter alongside Lois Lane.

What I think about Man of Steel is that Man of Steel is the story of an alien creature living among humans whose fate is to help the human race. This is like how in ancient Egypt, Egyptian workers built enormous pyramids, which were probably tombs for their leaders once deceased (the Pharaohs).

It is unknown how the ancient Egyptians were able to build these pyramids because there is no evidence that the Egyptians of ancient times had technology which could have made building those pyramids possible. It is a great mystery.

December 28, 2016
Les Anderson

One theory is that, as in history when impossible feats were accomplished without the benefit of technology, alien forces could have visited Egypt and helped the Egyptians build the pyramids with the help of the alien people’s technology. It is a popular theory among people who believe in life among the stars (Erich von Daniken is one scholar who argues that the theory is based on the real history, of Ancient Egypt).

Given that the pyramids would have been nearly impossible to build without technology, consider that aliens visited and lent a helping hand, with an interest in contributing to the prosperity of human beings (as a species). Man of Steel is a little like that because Superman is an alien living among humans helping preserve the human race from dangers that are inherent to people encountering alien creatures.

July 12, 2015
Wil Stewart

What I think is that when Superman reveals himself to human authorities, when he is given the ultimatum to surrender to his enemies, it is noted that Superman may be a hazard for human folk merely because his body may contain a disease that could be inflicted on humans. I say this because it is not immediately the fear of Superman’s powers as a superhero that bothers the authorities, or the details of Superman’s past in the Kansas town of Smallville, but whether Superman’s body could spread illness and death to the humans who meet him. I don’t think that the Egyptians meeting aliens who gave them help to build the pyramids, stopped their alien benefactors to question whether they would become sick from contact.

What I am thinking about Man of Steel, is what if the point of Superman’s existence among humans is that he doesn’t succeed at guiding human beings to a better existence? Every time it is questioned if humans in ancient times had visitors from other worlds among them, there is never evidence that the aliens caused devastation and ruin for people of the past.

What if Superman’s role as a visitor to modern-day people of the world demonstrates good intentions on Superman’s part, but poor planning for the man from Krypton that actually reduces the success of people to safely maintain conditions for life around the planet? When you sit down with Man of Steel, consider the possibility that while the strange realities that led the men and women of Ancient Egypt to construct pyramids, in this film, when Superman is battling and causing destruction in both Smallville and Metropolis, this could be the beginning of events that challenge human’s mastery of Planet Earth and undermine them in a way that will end in defeat and downfall. If Superman for once is the alien visitor closest to human beings in his physical form, could he likewise have the kinds of human weaknesses at the end of human’s reign over their blue and green planet?

Every other time in history that aliens might have come to help humans with the growth of their civilizations, are we, at last, to understand that there is no more? However, Superman feels about belonging to the human race, which is clearly passionate, considering the climax of the film when Superman is challenged by his nemesis about how he feels about human life, if Superman is the final alien visitor to Earth, is it because he will eventually destroy us all? That is how I would understand Man of Steel, instead of interpretations that are more along the lines of a visitor from the stars who kindly brings the benefit of his superpowers to help us, folk.

December 18, 2015
The Korus

Thank you for reading and good luck to you, whatever you do. Take care of yourself as always.

#DemocracyDay