World Economic Forum – Are They for Real?

According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), to successfully create a digital ecosystem, organizations need to adopt three core principles: becoming open, interoperable, and decentralized. Now, why would they claim this? What is their reasoning?

Before we can even begin answering that question –

  1. Why do you need to listen to the World Economic Forum?
  2. What is a Global Risks Report?
  3. Is it that important? Do I have to read it?
  4. Can it help me in my business and life?
  5. Are they making all these big moves based on data compiled from surveys or reports from some “experts” as they claim on their website www .weforum .org? That’s Davos Agenda.
  6. Why do you need to listen to the World Economic Forum?

On YouTube, Russell Brand made the point, a few days ago, that you weren’t invited, was you? He was illustrating that the conference doesn’t have your interests at heart, even though your leader in the world may have been there herself. Don’t you and everyone else pay state tax revenue?

Russell Brand works hard of assembling the 10,000-foot view.



BBC
Russell Brand: Society is collapsing – BBC News
  1. What is a Global Risks Report? The World Economic Forum (WEF) released its Global Risks Report 2022 recently. For seventeen years running, each year the Global Risks Report series tracks how risk experts and world leaders in business, government, and civil society perceive global risk.

The world’s best risk experts examine risk in five categories: economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal, and technological. I can remember learning about risk management in economics 101 in college, and my brother Josh once was heard to joke around about its significance. He’s also told me not to joke.

An example of an economic risk might be a nation’s gross national product losing value. About environmental risk, we’ve heard a lot, but it is how endangered species, for example, literally die off and no longer exist, which is not something everybody likes to acknowledge. All of us are men and women, and none of us are gods.

Those animals that cease to exist do matter. Everybody should understand that. Next, geopolitical risk has a clear example, right, in how Russia decided that Ukraine belongs to it.

You know it’s a nightmare. Societal risk, the next risk, is like Covid-19 killing people. Technological risk is like ByteDance giving teenage girls Tourette’s Syndrome, by addicting them to scrolling through TikTok.

Examples like these could be, I am guessing, in the WEF Global Risks Report. If I had more time, I would read it, other than looking over this year’s preface this week, but I’ve heard about it from a few thinkers. It could change the lives of everybody.

  1. Is it that important? Do I have to read it?

I don’t think you want to read that any more than you want to read the Terms and Conditions of Instagram or TikTok. My sister, Kaitlyn, I’ve heard make a point like that clear, but it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t think about it. You probably want to know that there is a powerful alliance around the world, with an interest in the new world order.

Did my sister and her husband know that? I don’t think they did.

  1. Can it help me in my business and life?

Not really. It means that the new world order is structured something like Dark Ages fealty. If you are a street vendor, you might make more money, because you’re potentially given additional authority to provide shoppers with distinct and necessary goods that they want.



Medievalists.net

I am not trying to worry people, but the writing’s on the wall. If you don’t want to work, you might accept universal basic income, free money to spend on renting commodities that you want or need. Merchants will have a role under this structure where they control people’s buying habits.

A problem is that they will be reporting everything you buy, compromising your freedom. Rather than involving you in the decision-making process, state assessments will be defining and predict what is going to happen. That is one way it resembles the Dark Ages.

Until the Renaissance, scholars sought to periodize history and influence how future generations would remember them, I have read. I’ve heard talk about the situation that has got me feeling like I should be a little concerned.

  1. Are they making all these big moves based on data compiled from surveys or reports from some “experts” as they claim on their website www .weforum .org? That’s Davos Agenda.

It’s countries surveying what is happening all over the planet and making expectations. It would put the government better in control. Russell Brand has, lately, again reminded his viewership that we’re supposed to be democratic.

Politicians should take their cues from citizens, Brand helps point out, not this potential for a new world order where everybody is dealing with undue government measures. I guess it should be clear that Brand is a successful comedian on YouTube whose channel might get us out of a mess.

In any case, Brand’s point isn’t exclusively to go against Davos, which he has been accomplishing for a long time.

I think Brand’s thing is that ordinary people can make intelligent decisions the same as people working in government (for example, politicians), and Brand doesn’t want a world bereft of qualities that lend themselves to being a decent place to live. Like if we let art stop, music and theatre come to an end, and we begin to live in a fealty-oriented Dark Age, it would not be a great civilization to be a part of. It would mean things like literature getting pointless, as nobody would be in a position to add to it, and media becoming state propaganda, instead of the assistance that digital media provides to things like democracy, human rights, and journalism.

I don’t think it would be a good idea. We would have the industry beneath Big Tech, and we wouldn’t be able to use it, even though it’s cheap to run, and as powerful as astronauts at NASA taking a shuttle to the moon. In 1969, contrasted with what even our youths naturally grasp, everyone with a cell phone and Internet access can explore enormous data momentarily.

You don’t grasp what Russell Brand is saying or talking about when you think of him as a comedian and (probably) a sex symbol. That’s fine, but it’s worth taking an interest in what he does, as Brand is dismissive of the World Economic Forum and critical of many discussions that indicate corruption or unfairness for the poor, or advantages that Big Tech and Big Pharma exploit to control people. He is on YouTube, and his videos are monetized, so that’s his career these days, but as a populist voice, he’s funny, and he’s good.

Brand’s interest in knowledge kind of grows, but it’s always going in the same direction, and his perspective, which he might deny he is giving you with his channel, is always in favour of a social change in a direction completely different than the Davos Agenda. From the fact that he has only one YouTube channel, you can infer that he has to distance himself from being the leader of a social movement. He will not be let off the hook unless he keeps mostly within the rules of the YouTube community.

I’ve never heard him say that a video of his was taken down, and I don’t think YouTube would want to do that to him, since he and his team are only a few people doing YouTube. He’s a virtuoso. Wouldn’t you say?

Thanks, Mr. Brand.

I started with the subject of this story, about associations zeroed in on being open, interoperable, and decentralized. I arrived at this question with the help of AI. Open means authentic, transparent, and inclusive.

These are good principles to follow. However, I am not sure that the WEF is sincere in saying that. I’ve provided above an idea of what Russell Brand says the agenda of the WEF looks like.

It’s open like thieves hiding in plain sight. Interoperability is conceivably a legend. Do you know who made that point loud and clear?

Mutahar, the YouTuber behind someordinarygamers, alluding to Meta’s metaverse, said in a recent video about whether Meta will prevail that it is basically not going to be interoperable with rival metaverses. A comparison was made between the interoperability of video games between rival systems. The metaverse is being discussed more and more every day, and I think there are two general realities in the metaverse that are relevant.

One is Meta’s metaverse, which is probably at least a couple of years away before its potential is realized, and the other is, I think, sort of Web 3.0. The basics of Web 3.0 is that it’s the Internet of Things. Neither of these accounts of the metaverse is comprehensive, but I suspect since I’m learning a little about the metaverse every day, which is just a drop in the bucket, that the best way to anticipate the heyday of the metaverse is to consider both Meta and Crypto.

I am not just not sure that there won’t be an endgame for either foundation of Big Tech. Decentralized is a buzzword that applied to bitcoin. I don’t think cryptocurrency is going to wind up decentralized, but nice try.



Encyclopedia Britannica

Jack Dorsey’s exit from Twitter illustrates how innovators in the cryptocurrency space will likely succumb to frustration and exhaustion, as he possibly did. The long and short is that the WEF is lying. They are borrowing from the best of the technology industries and laying waste to its potential.

That’s really what Russell Brand has picked up on and is critical of. Those kinds of lies could do a lot of harm to people who are lucky enough to live in the free world.