A Simple, Elegant Victory

“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.” -Charles Darwin

Two years ago I felt the world’s people could have victory; today I feel not.  The observation asks so much a complicated mire that I wonder if it will ever be resolved, and I’m not sure about it.

I remember being young, making decisions, feeling that the future would be cheery. books_aug_12_14_8116 Experiencing some maturity, if in short bursts, solving mysteries that confronted me and remaining interested in famous literature, music, and art were all part of the journey.

It is such a wearying experience to think about time lost and that the best of what could be termed intellectual is lost to time.  But there remain others who do the contemplating.

The machination of insight doth crumble.

A number of famous persons for whom I held enormous respect were celebrated certainly in their own right.  There was for many the very strong pull of events connected to ongoing victories which steered people in the direction of victory.  These aren’t forgotten to history, but for the individual who lacks focus:  likewise, some of the vision of the past has dimmed to a haze.

It no longer seems the times were defined by what interprets a victory, whether a top-selling album’s reissue with new songs, a recording artist’s return to form, or a novel’s adaptation for film.  I suspect, honestly, they weren’t, but my doubts could be daftness in me that has come on with age.  I remain unsure.

The times were at least signified by what had been done some dear, favorite pop icons, I think.  You will have your own.  Thank you for reading.

Unofficial Church Army

This week’s WordPress photo challenge is, oddly enough, about your personal moments of distraction when you are about practicing your self-discipline (i.e., when you are working).  I help a little with operations at a small cemetery in Ontario, in the city where I live.  We care for the grounds, etc. (you can find us on the Internet here).  However, to be totally honest, but it could be therapeutic, I am completely distractible by my own thoughts, which typically drift to my activities on the Internet, not so much Internet dating or the like, but being active on the Internet, and, more often, accessing music on the Internet.

 

It distracts me to no end and I begin to wish for it.

 

It is a terrible practice when I am expected to be solemn.  I regret this and try to conceal it.

 

However, for example… there is a church in front of the cemetery which disbanded in 2006 (you can find Louth United on Facebook here).  One of the thing that preoccupies is music by a band that was classic in the 1980s, The Church (see the similarity?  There’s a church.  I think about the song Under the Milky Way).  Even my mother has encouraged me to stop that.  However, I feel I am nearly part of what’s known as Church Army.  In fact, the other day I saw the band’s tweet announcing their North America tour of 2017.  Even though there is only one stop in Canada, and it is far west, in Vancouver, I thought I would put this in place because if you are in the United States, in a major center, here is when The Church is back in your town.

Church2017
2017 NORTH AMERICAN TOUR

I’ve thought about the possibility that I am doing a disservice to the religious, by speaking of The Church, who clearly utilize ideas about space and time in their music, which is somewhat heretical in the sense that ideas of that kind typically preclude a normal interest in God.  It really isn’t like that.  Steve Kilbey, who sings Under the Milky Way, knows quite a bit about Christian history, as I’ve observed in the blogging he’s done on his website The Time Being.  Other than that, he’s a major recording artist who has a classic song of the 1980s and he’s thoroughly cool.  I have that interest in him that I can’t shake, and it’s been years (feels like my whole life) that I’ve been feeling happy when I remember to play songs by his band The Church.  I realize that this is a far cry from what’s hip in my stretch of the sea, but I am consistently wowed by all the intellect, talent, and creativity that goes into Kilbey’s music, with and without The Church.  For example, Starfish from 1988, which includes Under the Milky Way, is full of great music that betrays that it’s a staple of the 1980s, but also a little more removed from stylistic touches that dominate most music of its day.  There was tons of tacky music in the 1980s.

 

Take a look at the tour poster for The Church in 2017 in North America.  You can find The Church on Twitter here.  If you are interested in any of this, feel free to ‘like,” “follow,” and/or “comment.”  Thank you for visiting and good luck this autumn.

Focus
Wednesday, August 16, 2017