15 Ways the Most Youthful Adherent to Video Research is Totally Overrated. Part III

Cats at play
Kittens
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Photographer:
Redd Angelo
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Photographer:
Greg Rakozy

This post is intended as the conclusion to two earlier posts, written and published recently.

Not to say that video doesn’t have many, many uses, sometimes even critical, I have thought of some observations debunking video.  Information learned from video research can be useful, particularly if it is assembled in a blog shared on Facebook.

I feel, historically, video research does not hold up given its artifice as evidence.  With good editing, that difficulty is somewhat rectified.  Here are five more ways that video research is overrated.  These are ways that video does not provide any more substantive information than where is otherwise available.

 

  1. Twitter’s Vine, now Periscope launched people with a genius for shooting six-second long videos, usually intended to be funny, meaning that if you were a creator with a knack for coming up with hilarious six-second videos.  On Vine, you could build a reputation and attract an audience.  The problem is that Vine came to an abrupt end because behind the scenes Twitter was continually working on becoming profitable and Vine didn’t enter the equation.
    Therefore the six-second video format of Vine left the Internet.  This is an example how video did not work in a specialized format that was “cool,” new and stimulating.
  2. Another way that video has failed the mainstream is the interesting but absurd idea that you can video-record phenomena, like Bigfoot, or UFOs.  An idea of going on an expedition to get a video recording of Bigfoot in his natural habitat, or UFOs in the night sky, often gets debunked by skeptics as “hoax.”  True experiences with phenomena of this kind go with a lot of excitement and potentially lasts only briefly.
    Videos of this kind are often derided, despite, of course, the additional risk that goes with trying to capture evidence of what’s alien and supernatural.  Also, there is the problem of informing on mysteries which government authorities commonly downplay.  If you want specifics about extraterrestrial astronauts, I think you will have a hard time procuring verifiable video recordings.
    It is not video research you can easily manage, despite popularity on television and on the internet.  “NASA Astronauts Discuss Extraterrestrial Life” https://binged.it/2Ga1mXi Extraterrestrial Laboratory
  3. Celebrity video recordings are not a reliable example of a video that can be examined for research purposes.  A celebrity sells a brand.  Observations made by the celebrity have an end goal in mind, not a general desire to be casually revealed.
    Researching the brand might be an approach, however, to video research that you could apply, but I think finding both a starting point and an endpoint could be difficult.  It might even take researching techniques for analyzing a brand if you’ve never studied that.  I doubt that you will find in a video the best information about analyzing a brand.
    That being said, I have no doubt you can earn the skill-set to analyze a brand as it’s represented in a video.  I think the evidence for the success of the brand would be better extrapolated by looking at the brand in the market apart from its appearance in a video context.  To be fresh, I think you would have to apply some expert touches.
  4. Coaching lessons in packages of a student-ready video may turn out to be somewhat dull in comparison to more novel approaches to learning.  A year ago I enjoyed completing a great WordPress course.  I took photos over the course of a couple of weeks, learning a little about photography with each and making something out of each lesson.
    I liked learning like that.  https://findingenvirons1.blog/2018/01/01/doggedly-capturing-developing-your-eye-themes-to-ring-in-the-new-year/
    If you have an opportunity to do some organized learning, I tend to think it is more fun if you can find applications you can apply in real life.  Try referencing research sources, perhaps some interactive, other than just video lessons, and I am thinking in addition about getting around the price of the video information, if it is part of a curriculum, belying how useful the information is.
    For example, a life coach offering videos to elevate your self-esteem could prove fruitless if you can’t make the lessons work, or if your intention falters and you no longer are acting in the manner required by the video curriculum.  This is important to note.  You can apply change only as much as you are mentally prepared to.
  5. I want to wrap this up with the suggestion that video research could have you preoccupied and unfocused what with possibilities opening for you that are more and more seductive and complicated.  You should remember your focus; you are not going to benefit by wasting time.
    Too much video and you are not getting done anything that’s worthwhile.  I feel if you are a consumer of video from a small number of creators who have focused themselves on something relatable, the focus that puts you amid them is what will keep you thinking consistently.  By that, I mean thinking in a way that organic learning, by a process of discovery, rather than by merely looking aimlessly, will be of some benefit to you.
    Your critical thinking may engage if you proceed this way.  I would put it to you to learn in this fashion.

 

This has been a three-part post about video research and how video research is over-rated.  If you enjoyed it, you’re welcome to like this post.  You can follow and subscribe as well.  Thank you again for reading me.

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Why the Next 10 Years of #WorldInternetDay Will Smash the Last 10

#WorldInternetDay

The Internet Exploded http://www.theinternetday.com/

 

In 2010, Google assessed the aggregate size of all information put away on the web to be about 5 million Terabytes, or, in other words, more than would fit on a billion standard DVDs.  As the world at large continues to adopt the Internet, Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt believes that everyone on earth could be online by 2020.

2006, 2010
First tweet, first Instagram image

While Schmidt is no longer Executive Chair, World Internet Day, founded October 29, 2005, has seen two meteoric success stories in the last ten years or so:  the origins of Twitter and Instagram.  Instagram remains, although in all probability not for much longer, a platform that’s easy to game if you are treating it as a business model.

 

Twitter continues to be difficult, as traditions specific to it have been abandoned. Notably, I mean the famed 140 character length which defined it for a long time, and also its algorithm which faces users with the question of whether they want tweets most likely to interest in front of them or whether tweets should display in chronological order.  Twitter just doubled the character limit for tweets to 280 https://www.theverge.com/2017/9/26/16363912/twitter-character-limit-increase-280-test

 

Web Milestones That Changed Technology

May 3, 2016

 

The next ten years can prove to be far better if you take an interest in science fiction.

 

Mark Twain Predicts the Internet in 1898: Read His Sci-Fi Crime Story, “From The ‘London Times’ in 1904” http://www.openculture.com/2014/11/mark-twain-predicts-the-internet-in-1898-read-his-sci-fi-crime-story-from-the-london-times-in-1904.html

As soon as the Paris contract released the telelectroscope, it was delivered to public use, and was soon connected with the telephonic systems of the whole world. The improved ‘limitless-distance’ telephone was presently introduced and the daily doings of the globe made visible to everybody, and audibly discussable too, by witnesses separated by any number of leagues.

That sounds a considerable measure like online networking.

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Photographer: Sebastien Gabriel

Book Blog Tour – How to Reach Your Writing Goals like a Pro

https://findingenvirons1.blog/2015/11/25/book-blog-tour-how-to-reach-your-writing-goals-like-a-pro/

I’d future-cast the Internet to become like a mold of science fiction stories, taking account that, while the use of “premium” websites will become more expensive, it is on account of the deeds of Ajit Pai.  California is rather distinct in its own right.  I can imagine individuals creeping into toll-use web stations making available premium websites in exchange for more money than what might be on your phone.

Ten years is plenty long enough for cryptocurrency to become legal tender, you might guess, as well as for Facebook to make internal decisions for public use how it was that Russian agents on Facebook pushed people’s decisions about ongoing US politics.  I can see the Internet of Things become a standard that the rich enjoy while the poor sneer, and how it is that Generation Z reaching maturity will have to decide for themselves how older generations succeeded in the years when you could become a successful author with Twitter, and when the Facebook algorithm hadn’t yet meant for business pages that organic reach for the typical business owner on Facebook would plummet very low.

Do you need a refrigerator that tells you what’s inside before you open the door?

#WorldInternetDay
World Internet Day

Competition in a free market is most fair if every member of such a world has only to pay the same for all Internet services, as doing business on the Internet may be a short-term solution to employment trouble or otherwise a set of tools to turn a business strategy into a realized dream.

We need the Internet to remain accessible.  While Russia saw to it that Facebook manipulated democracy in America in 2016, for the sake of fairness each individual ought to have the same Internet use, rather than choosing an Internet plan that keeps important sections of pages on the web removed from the ability to read and participate with.  While for the sake of reinvention I usually update the look of my Twitter on a quarterly basis, my current pinned tweet this quarter became an indication that Americans should press for the reinstatement of net neutrality laws, beginning with the few states like California that know the value of freedom and fairness.

I blog because I want a voice on WordPress.  I have a deal with my dad that I help with operations at a cemetery belonging to him and I feel I can tie in my work in my blog to my efforts at the cemetery http://www.maplelawncemetery.org/31601.html

Twice a week, typically, I tweet links to a few trending webpages.  My aim is to keep my hand in at research and I am aware of a desire I have presently unfulfilled to write.  I would like a writing idea to work at while I handle everything else, possibly simply writing a short story or rewriting one of the short stories I have written in the last few years.

For a little while, I tried freelance writing for a content mill, which wasn’t much fun, but perhaps I could think to try my hand at that sort of business all over again.  It has occurred to me that I could start a Facebook page, to try to light a spark to my name.  I don’t know if I will try that idea or not.

Thank you in advance for “liking,” commenting, and/or “following.”  I appreciate the sense I get when good people come around who show appreciation.

The keyword “kindness” is part of the Facebook business page for the cemetery.  We handle the cemetery solemnly and we try to be effective, not shy of contemporary modes of business.