What Alger Wrote about Silence

2018-01-19

By the time he died in 1899, Horatio Alger Jr. was the author of about a hundred volumes.  His popularity had dwindled, although his writing received favorable comments and a resurgence following his death.  Walter Sherwood’s Probation says, “There are times when silence is golden, and one of those times is at hand.”1

All of Alger’s novels rework the same plot:  a boy struggles to escape poverty.2 It’s not the age of silence. If one has any luck, he has a voice, with which to speak.

The Internet intertwines individual voices, and at times the roar is as one and other times it is dissident.

Humility’s not always to our advantage. When the human voice is silenced, it is the sound of silence, but not nearly as golden a silence as the failing Horatio Alger Jr. posited.

Don’t be inhibited by what is unkind luck and, therefore, misfortune.

Never hesitate when the iron is hot to be forward with this venture, and have a heart and be true. Feel welcome with your words.

Defy the repeal of net neutrality. When curating this the week of the fifteenth of January, 2018, from a post I did September 20, 2016, 20+ states were intent on suing for continuing net neutrality.

Do not let the US ISPs decide the future of the Internet. It is much better a level playing field. Small business can anticipate better odds of success if net neutrality is restored intact.

The weekly WordPress photo challenge Silence was presented Wednesday by Cheri Lucas Rowlands.

2018-01-19
Equipment to render information from noise and silence

If you’re of the mind to “like” this post or “follow” my blog, that’s great. You’re welcome to comment as well.

Works Cited:

1 dictionary.sensagent.com/horatio%20alger%20jr/en-en/
2 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Alger

What We Bear Intuitively Has Its Spark Ahead

In the grade ten science class I signed up for as a youth we were taught in one lesson about magnetic north, the point of magnetism at the Earth’s crest that attracts the needle of a magnet to correctly tells direction.

To think of the utmost north of the planet, you might think of packs of wolves, or avalanches, or penguins on icebergs.  If you’re in North America, you think of the land called Canada.compass rose

I imagine that traversing the Arctic Circle would be an adventure.  It would mean frigid seas, icy lands, unknown outcomes and great daring.  Quite a calling indeed.

A journey of that kind requires bravery, certainly, but a bravery I speculate as well often comes in a much more everyday sort, bravery in the face of adversity that meets you anytime.  There are everyday challenges people experience in their lives, wherever they are, that call on a summons to bravery that doesn’t go documented or rewarded in a grandiose sense or generally very much even recounted.

Human beings draw on a reserve of bravery in their individual lives just about every day of their lives.  The thing that is certain is that life is uncertain.

While drawing on the probability that mankind desires above all else satisfaction, found in calm avenues amid gentility, it doesn’t mean the individual doesn’t struggle.

There is a fundamental desire to capture the most of the resources which can be had, I think.  It explains why it is people invest so much time and energy in competition.

In grade ten the gentleman schooling us in magnetism could have said more about what it would take come adulthood.  The long and short is he didn’t.

Today’s WordPress Daily Prompt is the word compass.  Thank you for glancing upon this utterance, and good luck to you as together we forge a future that requires steadfast resolution.

I recommend you seize the day, but temper your passions with kindness.  Like your desire, magnetic north should never shift.

Blog Challenge Argumentative

What seems free may have strings attached.

I wrote the first version of this post within the last year.  As part of a semi-weekly exercise in curating the blog posts I’ve written which I continue to think could have some potential (!), I have returned to this post with an interest in making it more accurate.

 This month in the United States the FCC will vote whether to repeal the legislation protecting net neutrality, and the Internet will likely become controlled in that nation by ISPs including Verizon, Comcast, and AT&T.  This means that some websites will function better (swifter) than others.  That isn’t good for the free speech of the Internet.

 What I wrote on St. Patrick’s Day of 2016 that remains true is this:  Some are in the dark about what could result from the lack of Internet controls generally enjoyed in the present.  I went on to say:  What seems free may have strings attached.

flag, united states, us, clouds, sky, freedom, democracy, flag pole, sovereignty, state, nation, country
Photographer: Christopher Burns

 

The literal price tag of any given service often includes only the bare essentials as they are understood. To thrive, a few dollars here and there (on apps, plug-ins, hardware, etc.) may be required, and the economic definition of scarcity surely applies here. For the desired recognition, I venture to guess that once more as in other similar situations money talks.

 This sounds like I am in favor of the repeal the FCC is likely doing, but I was actually only being facetious.  However, this does resemble in some fashion the reality what is going to happen in many Internet markets (most notably in the US).  To be competitive, without legislation to protect the free Internet, there are going to be requirements to “pay” (i.e., to spend for services) where presently it is a level playing field.

 

I mistakenly believed it was a right to privacy that would be contested, and while there has been such a battle, which is ongoing, but a clearer picture of how it is the Internet remains usable is not unlike what I wrote on that St. Patrick’s Day:  If you are subpar, you will be told as much as an army of folk waiting to raise their spears are as much the wolves at the door as Mom and Dad were in the old days. You need to excel or, plain and simple, you will be failing hard and failing fast.

 

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, but it is crucial that you learn from your mistakes as they happen to you. Own them and learn, and put them to rest with a dash more of hope for having conquered something, at least.  I always think that trying and failing is better than not to have tried an effort at all.

 Red and Green Alert Buttons

You need to bring to bear content, which is the substance of media as it’s understood on the Internet with an eye to generating traffic for your particular je ne sais quoi. You need to be real and you need to think smart, and the end result has to be a brand that is somehow recognizable on the Internet if you want to earn turf in cyberspace.

 I have put it in fancy language because I think it is a fancy thing, I wrote.  The need to argue for net neutrality is serious.  More than a few think the devil be damned and enjoy the occasional spotlight as it illuminates the crowd, I said.

 

You should accept that the decision to repeal the FCC legislation protecting net neutrality is a problem for those who count on their voices behind heard on the Internet and that the future will begin to be controlled by corporations, not individuals.  That is often the prize for the amateur designer, the potential and the possibility.

I Think You’ll Know if You’re Ready

I tend to admire those who do what is risky.  With abandon, they shine.

 

Today’s WordPress Daily Prompt is the word risky, and I think of what it is to admire the risk-takers who venture off the beaten path.  Unsung or making it, it is independence and vigor that become such attractive qualities in an individual who gravitates to risk-taking.

 

Think, then, of what might have come to pass, if you had seen how a greater amount of measured risk could have delivered to you more, simply, of what you wanted out of life.  It might have meant fewer regrets and greater happiness all around if you could have better calculated what risk to take and how to navigate it.

globe, world, atlas, travel, trip, map
Photographer: Seth Showalter

I should think there is no life without risk.  Every human being is required to step a careful path, to proceed with enough caution to survive, as the hazards of life among the human species are probably incalculable, even with the most grave of assessments and the power to determine outcomes in our hands.  Human beings need to take risks each and every day.

 

It must be in our biological makeup, that there are those who explore risk-taking more thoroughly than others, and that is a quality of mankind called leadership.  Someone who identifies which risks can be surmounted is often thought of a leader, and that how the first arrivals are determined.  It comes as no surprise.

ocean, chairs, view, sky, clouds, landscape, grass, picnic, towel, shore, travel, trip, adventure, relax
Photographer: Kelly Jean

If we are in a seat of comfort and ease, perhaps risk will not be traversed with much relish, but if we want to change and be challenged, then it is in our hands that we must read the odds of success in the physical and metaphorical moves we make and how we can turn a situation on its head.  This is in the hands of the daring, the courageous and, I’m afraid as well, the foolhardy.

 

The fool is he who is defeated by the adversity he brings on himself, and you will hear mentors swear there is nothing wrong with this, that if you look for answers you hear of the hundred or thousand failures that made a man, that success was ultimately won by perseverance and sweat and hard work.  It could be so, and I think there are many examples to speak of who do master risk-taking in the capacity that it brings the desired result, what is thought of as success.  Few argue with the champs.

 

You need to practice caution, I would implore you, and learn the reality of what you’re undertaking and what needs to be done to overcome risk (and adversity).  That being said, many times the regret you have comes from risks you didn’t take, rather than from the sting of failure.  Because if you dedicate yourself to mastery, you could attain that level of ability.

 

Last, for everything that’s said and done about risk and reward, you need to choose for yourself what is best for you.  Although the allure of risk-taking and, quite possibly, positive change in your life may attract you, you do need to make concessions in light of the danger that can mount from undue risk–rebellion such as it is.  You have but one life, and you need to manage it in a way that the best possible rewards are attainable without destroying yourself or others in the process.

 

This is how I think of risk, and it is nothing but natural and human to think of risk.  It is always a double-edged sword.

 

Happy Birthday: Felicity Jones