Why Starting to Discover TikTok is the Key to Hillary 2016

I never like guarantees that web-based efficacy is a losing strategy. No, I don’t mean Marvel’s web-slinging hero, I mean laments that the Internet will fade away, with history.

I altered my Twitter profile yesterday, something I complete four times each year, quarterly.  My new bio jokes that I am a social media advocate, which isn’t funny in of itself but reflects the fact that I am a fan of Twitter, so it’s nice, I feel, to express such.

Sure there is real-life social media advocacy.  With each open door to the millions who are on social, I accept that being on social is a fundamental bravo. I have faith in it.

Photographer:
WDnet Studio

I am part of my father’s business.  It isn’t modern showcasing.  We have a Facebook page with a few dozen individuals, a couple of who I sporadically communicate with.  You can find Maple Lawn Cemetery on Facebook here: http://bitly.ws/7xKe

As luck would have it, my mom sent me an email this week with a connection to TikTok, which my sister and her significant other had got on.  I hadn’ t known the two of them were using TikTok.  My sister and her husband live in England, and the companionship I have of her is generally restricted to letters by email, which is decent; yet I figured she would like it that I pursued her on TikTok.

I began to find TikTok.

I do worry about privacy, which everybody should worry about, but it was clear from the first few videos I enjoyed that a new door had opened.  Could you call it the grassroots of the Internet?  I don’t know that is an exact description, yet that is the sort of impression I got from my first experiences with the app.

Remember Hillary 2016, when Cambridge Analytica was implicated in shady election returns in the race for the US Presidency?  Facebook accounts affected by Cambridge Analytica, the firm entrusted with concocting a system to influence US voters, were accused of enacting a naughty political plan.  When this came to light, it was a gigantic scandal.

Both a hit to the public impression of Facebook’s reliability and the validity of Donald Trump’s administration, I wonder today what was going on with TikTok four years ago.  It jumped out at me to check it out.

Photographer:
Travel Coffee Book

The initial release of TikTok, I read, was in September 2016.  TikTok is the Chinese application that was the most downloaded in the US, in October 2018, Wikipedia presently says.  Interested users downloaded TikTok more than 104 million times on Apple’s App store during the full first 50% of 2018, as indicated by information given to CNBC by Sensor Tower, situated in San Francisco.

TikTok outperformed Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram to turn into the world’s most downloaded iOS application for that timespan. Live-streaming was no longer the biggest thing going.  “The biggest trend in Chinese social media is dying, and another has already taken its place,” CNBC said.

TikTok surpassed Facebook, YouTube and Instagram to become the world’s most downloaded iOS app for that time, Sensor Tower data indicated.

The Internet in China is broadly edited, and because there is such an enormous number of TikTok users, it’s undeniable that there’s a question of whether calculated external pressures are contributing to control at TikTok.  At the point when you take a gander at the truth that the Cambridge Analytica embarrassment started to require that web-based media be inspected and controlled, it makes sense that TIkTok could by and by be under a similar kind or increasingly unavoidable restriction, superficially so that there aren’t similar issues to what happened at Facebook in 2016.

It’s clear that while on the surface TikTok is home to countless videos, it wouldn’t be shocking if governments unrooted censorship issues.  I think it would be awful if problems similar to the Cambridge Analytica meddling repeated on TikTok or anywhere else, with such nefarious difficulties leading to the regulation of social media everywhere.  We’ve already had the proposal of Article 13 in the EU beginning to promise severe limitations on the use of memes in social media, like on YouTube.

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I am sure you know what a meme is, a kind of visual remix on the Internet, where one signifier is translated under a magnifying glass to mean something new and different.  Like Inspector Clouseau’s cartoon caricature in the introduction to many of the Pink Panther films, Peter Sellers chasing that elusive cat.  While Article 13 isn’t making strident progress, if a scenario occurred where social media became more and more censored, it would be the beginning of the end to countless promising opportunities.

We could make it the norm to pursue goals of unity and brotherhood, while enjoying economic success, a possibility for the same good fortune had social media never taken shape, as on platforms Myspace and Friendster, with a more level playing field.  If the decade ahead sees social media get dead and buried, that’s some of the best opportunities on the Internet falling by the wayside.

I don’t care for control.  TikTok has altered my impression of Internet video beginning with a couple of them shot by my sister and her better half.  I thought I would write about it as I can see a change in my habits beginning now that I am seeing for myself what TikTok is like.

It is fun, intrigue notwithstanding.  A debt of gratitude is in order.You’re free to like, to pursue, or potentially to remark.  Have an incredible week!

Photo Inspired by Numbers 32:13-15

Bus stop

This is again Lent, and I was pleased three years ago to try photographing shopping carts, at the side of a street. In the photo, few people, even no one, are on hand who need them. The shopping carts speak to an absence.

The Bible in Numbers 32 details how the Israelites were lost, for so long, that they were reduced an entire generation.

Reminders that The Lord is a vengeful deity are important. In Numbers 32:13-15 The Lord feels burning anger at Israel. It is important that we remain optimistic, but pragmatic, about future generations prospering.

In the photo I took, shopping carts have been abandoned by the shoppers. Likewise in Numbers 32:13-15, Israel lost an entire generation by resisting the influence upon them, of The Lord.

The passing sight of lined-up shopping carts reminds an onlooker that there was a human presence, but it has dispersed.  Whoever was responsible for the decision to make a spectacle of wayward shopping carts is gone now. Perhaps this is common in every community, but something is incorrect about the moment.

I found these verses from the Book of Numbers to suggest what I am showing.

For what reason was Israel reviled with forty years to meander?

13 The LORD’s anger burned against Israel and he made them wander in the desert forty years, until the whole generation of those who had done evil in his sight was gone.

14 “And here you are, a brood of sinners, standing in the place of your fathers and making the LORD even more angry with Israel. 15 If you turn away from following him, he will again leave all this people in the desert, and you will be the cause of their destruction.”

Numbers 32:13-15

Despite all this, Lent remains for me in middle age a challenge to observe.

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